Winning Slowly

Taking the long view on technology, religion, ethics, and art. There are plenty of podcasts that will tell you how Apple’s latest product will affect the tech landscape tomorrow, but there aren’t that many concerned with the potential impact of that tech in 2026. In a culture obsessed with now, how can we make choices with a view for tomorrow, next year, and beyond?

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7.01: Do We Really Need to Keep the Internet Around?


Season 7’s charter—by way of a rollicking argument about Alan Jacobs’ The Year of Our Lord 1943 and Tolkien’s idea of eucatastrophe. Show Notes Major figures we discuss in this episode:

  • Alan Jacobs’ recent work The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisi
  • Jacques Ellul
  • C. S. Lewis
  • T. S. Eliot
  • Jacques Mauritain
  • Simone Weil
  • J.R.R. Tolkien
    • The Lord of the Rings
    • The Silmarillion
    • eucatastrophe: from “On Fairy Stories” (published in The Monsters and the Critics)
Other topics/figures/books/etc. we mentioned:
  • The Bill Nye/Ken Ham debate
  • “A Conflict of Crypto Visions” – Arjun Balaji on Thomas Sowell’s A Conflict of Visions
  • Oliver O’Donovan – see especially his Resurrection and Moral Order
  • natural law and the naturalistic fallacy
  • technocracy
  • Chris’ newsletter and specifically his issue on 1943: Have We Already Lost?
  • Phaedrus
Also, Audio Hijack saved our bacon because Chris’ computer temporarily lost power due to a blizzard—and we lost nothing. If you’re in the business of audio and on a Mac, you should check out Rogue Amoeba’s excellent apps. Music
  • ”Me Nasi” by Panfur
  • “Winning Slowly Theme” by Chris Krycho.
Sponsors Many thanks to the people who help us make this show possible by their financial support! This month’s sponsors:
  • Daniel Ellcey
  • Jake Grant
  • Jeremy W. Sherman
  • Marnix Klooster
  • Nathaniel Blaney
  • Spencer Smith
If you’d like to support the show, you can make a pledge at Patreon or give directly via Square Cash. Respond We love to hear your thoughts. Hit us up via Twitter, Facebook, or email!


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 2019-03-27  38m