Curiously Polar

The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discovery and have witnessed both great triumphs and miserable defeats. As a planetary litmus paper it is at the poles we can detect the effects of natural oscillations and human activities on the global ecosystems.

https://curiouslypolar.com/

subscribe
share





104 100 Years of Svalbard Treaty


Watch the video

This year marks the 100th anniversary of one of the most remarkable international treaties - The Spitsbergen Treaty. Signed in times of tremendous turmoil right after World War I the 14 countries recognises the sovereignty of Norway over the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, at the time called Spitsbergen. Over the years, more than 40 states have ratified the treaty grant numerous rights to the signatory countries, such as access to Svalbard including the right to fish, hunt or undertake any kind of maritime, industrial, mining or trade activity. But the times of the celebrations are overshadowed by threats and gestures from parties who interpret the contract differently. And so it remains exciting to see where the next 100 years of the contract will lead, that taught lessons of territorial temptation and regulates the handling of the northernmost part of Europe.


share







 2020-07-14  37m