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For the first time in a long time, it feels like all people on Earth have something in common. An exploration of what unites us in a time of social distancing, we visit and re-visit people in Hongkong and India, Greece and Gaza, among other places.

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episode 2: Hong Kong: New Life, Postponed [transcript]


When Wenni and Dominic are ready to start their new life abroad, they test positive.

This episode was recorded on August 9, 2020.

Guests Wenni, Hong Kong

Wenni is an insurance agent in Hong Kong.

Other episodes with Wenni:

  • Hong Kong: Pandemic Easier than Politics
  • Hong Kong: Pause and Rediscover the Passion
Dominic, Hong Kong

Dominic is a social worker in Hong Kong.

Other episodes with Dominic:

  • Hong Kong: Pandemic Easier than Politics
  • Hong Kong: Pause and Rediscover the Passion
Additional Shownotes

More about Record of Change and this episode, including a transcript, in the post for this episode on our website: recordofchange.com

Follow Record of Change or subscribe to the podcast on:
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or wherever you find podcasts.

Credits
  • Matthias Jochmann (Associate Producer, Post Production)
  • Kecheng Fang (Host, Producer)

An Huy Tran, Thomas Reintjes, Prathap Nair and Stephanie Raible also helped make this episode.


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 2020-09-13  28m
 
 
00:01  Kecheng Fang
Hi, you're listening to Record of Change.
00:04
Record of Change listens to eight individuals located on every continent how their lives have been twisted by the COVID-19 pandemic.
00:14
My name is Kacheng Fang.
00:15
I'm talking to you from Hong Kong.
00:19
Today, we are listening to Wenni, who is an insurance agent, and her husband, Dominic, who is a social worker.
00:26
Both of them are now in Hong Kong and were infected with the coronavirus.
00:27
They have recovered from the disease and kindly agreed to share their experience.
00:33
I'd like to first ask about.
00:41
How did you first hear about coronavirus?
00:45
Did you hear that in January or even before that?
00:49  Wenni
I think I heard it in January and before the Chinese new year.
00:54
Every year I will go back to my hometown, Wuxi in Jiangsu province to celebrate Chinese new year with my parents.
01:04
But before that I heard about the coronavirus.
01:08
So I was hesitating if I should go back, then I asked parents and they told me it's not a big
01:17
deal, it's just a very small amount of persons who get infected and most of them are in Wuhan.
01:27
So they asked me to go back with my husband.
01:31  Kecheng Fang
So during that time, people's perception were quite different from now, right?
01:35
During that time, it seems that people in Hong Kong were very, very nervous, but people in mainland China were very, very relaxed.
01:42
Is that so?
01:44  Dominic
Yeah, we heard it in January, but at that time, the situation is not severe as now.
01:50  Kecheng Fang
So I also remember during that time, people in Hong Kong seems to be talking about this virus, much more than people in mainland China.
01:58
Was that because people in Hong Kong actually had memory of the SARS outbreak in 2003.
02:06
Is that something that heavily influenced how people in Hong Kong perceive Corona virus this time?
02:12
So were you in Hong Kong in 2003, Dominic?
02:15  Dominic
Yeah.
02:15
Yeah, I was.
02:17
Definitely.
02:18
I think it's because of SARS we are more experienced to it.
02:22
We took a lot more precautions, so we started to wear mask, wash hands because we experienced that, you know, in earlier days.
02:30
So definitely it reminds us of a horrible time.
02:33
So that's why we took a lot of precautions, you know?
02:35  Kecheng Fang
Did you go back to a hometown together during the Chinese new year, despite pandemic.
02:40  Dominic
Yeah.
02:41  Kecheng Fang
Have ever thought that you would eventually become the direct victims of the virus?
02:46  Wenni
No, since I didn't experience SARS.
02:50
In 2003, I was in my hometown Wuxi I think few people was diagnosed with SARS.
02:59
So it seems very far away from my life.
03:03
So even I know the COVID-19 happened all over the world.
03:10
I don't think it has nothing to do with me.
03:13
I even joke with my husband.
03:16
we won't be so unlucky to get virus.
03:20
If we got it we should go to the luck...
03:24  Kecheng Fang
Did you buy lottery tickets?
03:25  Wenni
No, because we know we are not so lucky.
03:32  Kecheng Fang
Okay.
03:32
Can you share us with experience of being infected with COVID-19?
03:36
Like, how did you, and where did you get this virus?
03:39
Do you have answers to that question or is it still actually also a mystery to you?
03:41  Dominic
Well actually it's after a trip from Canada, so the very next day, you know, I have a sore throat, few coughs and I'm slightly feverish.
03:51
At first I thought it's probably nothing.
03:53
It's just probably because we have had a long flight, so, you know, just probably tired, but then, you know, I just want to play safe.
03:59
So I went to get checked in a clinic and they sent me to the hospital right away.
04:06
And then, I stayed there for one night and then the next day, the doctor told me that, Oh, you're tested positive.
04:13
And that moment I was quite shocked because I hardly have any symptoms.
04:17
So, and actually I feel quite fine.
04:19
So it's very unbelievable that, you know, I got tested positive.
04:23
And, that might, that moment, you know, I, I told my wife to take a taxi and come to the hospital, you know, immediately to also get checked, checked out.
04:33
And,she got tested positive too.
04:35
So we were actually quite shocked, you know, at that time.
04:39  Wenni
I have some symptom it's hard similar, to my husband.
04:43
I also had sore throat and the muscle pain and I feel very tired, but I just think it's maybe because of the jet lag.
04:54
It's pretty much like a cold
04:55  Kecheng Fang
Hmm.
04:57
was it that you, got somewhat, somehow got infected during the flight?
05:01  Wenni
we went to Canada to Toronto on 3rd of March and we stayed there for two weeks.
05:11
cause we, needed to buy a property and do other things to prepare for our immigration.
05:17
At that time, the situation in Canada, I mean, the COVID-19 epidemic was not very serious.
05:25
people in Canada they even didn't wear mask.
05:27
when we fly back to Hong Kong, the plane is full of people and the lady sitting next to me was from New York.
05:40
I think maybe I was get infected in the plane, but, we can't find the, answer.
05:47  Kecheng Fang
So during that time, people are in the North America, they were not doing this social distancing, they're not doing this or this
05:55
protective measures, so after you heard the news that you tested positive, were you like immediately sent to some like special hospital rooms?
06:09  Wenni
Yes.
06:09
We both sent to two isolation rooms, in Tseung Kwan O hospital.
06:17
At first we live in two rooms, but due to the lack of the isolation room, we moved together in the next day.
06:26
In the second day.
06:27  Kecheng Fang
Okay.
06:28
how was the treatment?
06:29
So how were you being treated?
06:30
Was it like any, like treating like a fever or treating like a cold was there anything special about the treatment.
06:38  Dominic
the doctor actually came in and, give us two options.
06:41
So one is just, normal care plan.
06:44
So just, care for the symptoms without treating the virus.
06:48
The other is, they give us a choice to take a pill.
06:52
Kaletra.
06:53  Wenni
Kaletra
06:54  Dominic
Which is a pill that is used to fight SARS in the past.
06:59
it's also used for AIDS and SARS.
07:01
So, she said that there's no guarantee, but if you want to take a risk, you know, they're willing to gamble with you.
07:07
So both of us, we choose to take the pills.
07:10
Yeah.
07:10
So we have to take the pills every day.
07:13  Kecheng Fang
It seems that, Dominic spent about 12 or a dozen days longer than your wife in hospital?
07:20  Dominic
47 days.
07:21  Kecheng Fang
47 Days in total.
07:22
That's really a long time.
07:23
So, so yeah.
07:25
So, so did the doctors give any like explanation why you stayed much longer than your life?
07:32  Dominic
no, actually, but, like in our board, like most of the female patients get discharged earlier, so majority of them are male patients.
07:40
So it, I don't know the virus just like male patients, I guess.
07:45
So, there's there's, there's no really solid explanation,
07:49  Kecheng Fang
We still know so little about this virus,actually.
07:52
I want to ask you what's your feeling throughout this journey?
07:56
Like you were, firstly, you were very shocked, right?
07:59
You didn't really expect that you could be tested positive.
08:02
And then did you feel any like fear or despair?
08:06
Because we know so little about the disease, maybe.
08:09
Did you ever have this kind of a feeling.
08:13  Dominic
Yeah.
08:13
Yeah, definitely.
08:15
you know, I'm fairly fearful, I don't want to lose my life, you know, and, like everything was so sudden.
08:22
So, even if we thought that, Oh, like would we die from this, you know, but we're so young, like, would we, not see
08:29
our families again, you know, Like all this has, certainly, you know, take place, but then after a while the doctor
08:37
said like, the most critic time is over like that we don't sustain any damage in the lungs or in a major organ.
08:44
So that's when we get a bit relief.
08:47
Yeah.
08:48
But then, the waiting process is, you know, it's hard to bear because every day you, you get tested.
08:55
And every day the doctor say, Oh, you're still test positive.
08:58
So you still have to stay here.
08:59
So like every day you have a hope and every day you get to despair again.
09:03
So it's quite hard to bear.
09:05  Kecheng Fang
So when did you get the news that, the most critical time has already passed.
09:10  Dominic
after a week or so
09:12  Wenni
I think two weeks, two weeks.
09:16
Yeah.
09:16
Yes.
09:16  Kecheng Fang
So that's, that means that the first one to two weeks was the worst.
09:20
And then after that you are, much relieved and that's, waiting for being discharged
09:28
what's your feel Wenni?
09:30
Did you feel the same as your husband.
09:34  Wenni
Yes.
09:34
And also, I was so scared to, never see my parents again.
09:40
Cause I've been in Hong Kong for like nine years and my parents are still living in mainland China and due to the travel ban.
09:49
They, they are not able to come to Hong Kong, even.
09:52
I was, get infected.
09:53
So I, at the time I was so scared that I will die in Hong Kong, and then I was not able to see them before I die.
10:04  Kecheng Fang
So when you were feeling much fearful, and even thinking of death, did you
10:09
ever come with idea of like who to blame for this pandemic for the, for your situation?
10:16
Did you think of blaming anyone for this.
10:19  Wenni
we decided to immigrate to Canada because of the recent situation in Hong Kong.
10:25
We will lose our freedom.
10:26
We will lose our rights.
10:29
That's why we decided to immigrate.
10:32
And that's why we get infected in the way of immigration.
10:37
So.
10:38
I think it is the Chinese government.
10:41
I blame most.
10:46  Kecheng Fang
both of you were in the same room for most of your treatments in hospital, right?
10:51  Wenni
Yes.
10:52  Kecheng Fang
What's your daily conversation like during that time I'm hospital?
10:55
What, what did you do?
10:56
Can you go online?
10:58
Can you use face Facebook, can you watch entertainment programs?
11:03
Can you do all those things in hospital rooms?
11:07  Wenni
There is no wifi in there, but we can use our own signal of the cell phone, but it is limited.
11:16
So we cannot surf online so much time.
11:20
Mostly we watch TV, but there is only TVB in hospital.
11:26
So we just watch the soap opera, talking about the Hong Kong police.
11:33
It's very boring at the time, actually every day we have nothing to do.
11:38  Dominic
So actually our routine is quite structured, like, every day at 8:00 AM, they're bringing breakfast, take our temperatures.
11:46
Usually after breakfast, the doctor will call to check up on us and then to bring us the test result from the previous day.
11:53
And then we'll have some new tests.
11:55
after that in the afternoon, I usually do some exercise or read a book and my wife usually took a nap, you know?
12:04
And then, around six they bring in the dinner.
12:07
So we have our day and you know, that's about it.
12:11
Yeah.
12:12  Kecheng Fang
so you sleep early and then get up early
12:15  Wenni
yeah,
12:15  Kecheng Fang
Very healthy routines
12:17  Dominic
yeah,
12:17  Kecheng Fang
Yeah.
12:17
So what was your interactions with, doctors, nurses and the care workers during that time?
12:24
I guess they were like very well protected.
12:27  Dominic
So every day the care workers, they will come, they'll put on the full gear with the masks and
12:34
gloves and protective clothing, and they'll come to our rooms to do some cleaning, take away the trash.
12:39
And also they will mop, the nurse will come in to do the tests for us.
12:45
The doctor hardly comes in.
12:46
The doctor usually we just communicate over the phone.
12:49
Yes.
12:50
So she'll call us, inform us about, the test results and whether or not the, the pills are, you know, having effect
12:57
or, and then we also tell them about the side effects and the doctor will help to match our side effects, you know?
13:04
So, we, we don't get to see the doctor a lot.
13:06
But we communicate over the phone usually.
13:08  Kecheng Fang
so you interacted most with the care workers right?
13:11  Dominic
Yes,
13:12  Wenni
yes.
13:13  Kecheng Fang
What did they say to you?
13:14
What's your daily conversation like?
13:15  Wenni
well most of them are not, the professionals.
13:20
They are middle age woman, but they are very, they are very kind and friendly.
13:26
Yeah.
13:27
Yes.
13:28
since we lived there for a long time, yes.
13:31
So we got more and more familiar.
13:34
We always see each other and say, sometimes they will bring us some snacks and sometimes they even encourage us.
13:44
Yeah.
13:44
Yes.
13:45
Yeah.
13:45
They are very nice.
13:46  Kecheng Fang
Is it allowed that they bring you things from outside?
13:52  Dominic
Occasionally.
13:53
Yes, because it's, it's somehow it's coming up from their own pockets.
13:56
So, you know, we don't, we don't want to insist.
13:59
Right.
13:59
But at the same time, the meals in the hospital is very bland and it's almost the same, like every day.
14:05
So it's good to have some outside food.
14:08
And once in awhile,
14:10  Wenni
It's also things we are, we got infected, so we ask them to wear mask even in the rooms.
14:17
So every time they came in, actually, I, I don't want to talk to them to increase their risk of getting infected.
14:25
But they just, talk to us, initiate the conversation.
14:30
So which means a lot to us, I think.
14:33  Kecheng Fang
Oh, that's very nice of them to do so.
14:36
Talking about the help and support, did you feel that you got sufficient help from the government?
14:44  Wenni
we don't think so.
14:45
we didn't receive any financial, or other support from the government.
14:50  Kecheng Fang
What about the community and your friends?
14:53  Dominic
well friends, like, you know, we talk to them like, through the internet and they give us the emotional support, the care about us, they ask about us.
15:02
So, but then they can never come and visit us.
15:05
So not even our parents.
15:06
So, so the most they can do is bring us some food, but they can only leave it at the door so someone can bring it in to us.
15:15  Kecheng Fang
So I guess that was, quite difficult for you psychologically, right?
15:20  Wenni
Yeah.
15:21
Yeah.
15:21  Kecheng Fang
Cause you were forced to be isolated from the world.
15:26  Wenni
yeah, since I can't talk too much of my fear with my parents.
15:32
So mostly I talked to my friends, they gave me a lot of emotional supports.
15:42  Kecheng Fang
what were you hearing during your days in hospital?
15:44  Dominic
Like the sound of, like the, the air conditioner and also the sound of the negative pressure,
15:50
the negative pressure that there's a, there's like, it's like an engine is like a small engine.
15:54
So it, it goes on like every single day.
15:57
because for me, I also wrote it on my blog.
15:59
So, after I got discharged, like I heard that birds chipping.
16:04
The birds, and I heard like cars crossing, and these are, you know, very new to me at that moment.
16:10
And I felt like the, the sunshine, like sunshine on my skin, it felt really warm.
16:17
And, you know, I felt like, Oh, okay.
16:19
I haven't felt this for a long, long time.
16:21  Kecheng Fang
Hmm.
16:21  Dominic
you know, these are some, you
16:23
Something
16:23  Kecheng Fang
used to be ordinary became totally new to you.
16:27  Dominic
exactly.
16:28  Kecheng Fang
Did you like, get any new ideas of the world, the life during those dozen of
16:36
days in hospital, because when people have nothing to do, maybe they can become a philosopher.
16:43  Wenni
Actually.
16:44
I was a sales person.
16:47
I sell insurance.
16:50
So I was fairly stressful.
16:51
Most of my, during the last two years, but by the time I was got into the hospital, I, I found nothing is more important than my parents and my family members.
17:06
So yes, now I was.
17:09
very peaceful even I had no business at all.
17:14
Yes.
17:14
Cause I think like, our career, our job is just part of our life.
17:20
We should focus more on our family.
17:23  Dominic
So for me as well, like, you know, once you experience something like near death experience, it really makes you reprioritize what
17:31
you value most in life that would definitely, I put my weight to my family, you know, I should spend more time with them, love them more.
17:41
A positive thing about the experience is I get to read some of the books that I always wanted to read, but I never got a chance to, so I read like three books.
17:49
and then, you know, this is something that I enjoyed the past, but I was just too busy with my life, so I didn't get a chance.
17:55
So it's very good to, you know, to go back to these passions, you know, and also also learn to do yoga.
18:04
so I think it's just, you would take better care of your own body, your health.
18:09
Because even if you gain the whole world, but if you lose health, you lose yourself.
18:13
there's no point to it.
18:14  Kecheng Fang
That's quite touching.
18:15
You still get positive things out of this definitely bad experience.
18:20
so I hope, you have already fully recovered.
18:23
is that so, or did you have a, you talk about side effects?
18:26
Did you, did you have any like residual effects?
18:29  Dominic
yeah.
18:29
So I have some impairment with my smell sense.
18:32
So, I'm still going to the smell clinic to follow up on that.
18:38
So, you know, it's, it's, it's not damaged, but it's, it's slightly impaired.
18:41  Kecheng Fang
does that mean that you cannot smell anything or can not smell a certain kind of taste?
18:46  Dominic
No, it's, it's just that, it, it smells different.
18:48
Like, you know, it smells different than what it should be.
18:51  Kecheng Fang
So like spicy thing does not smell like spicy at all.
18:55  Dominic
something like that.
18:56
Yeah.
18:56
Yeah.
18:56
So I'm going through some treatment for that.
18:58
The sensories take, they can grow back.
19:00
Yeah,
19:00  Kecheng Fang
Oh, okay.
19:00
That's good to know.
19:01
Yeah.
19:02
And that's the thing, it's a very special experience, to smell something diferently.
19:13
Did you experience any discrimination after recovering from COVID-19.
19:22  Wenni
Yes, two weeks or three weeks ago, I had a sore throat and then I go to the GP.
19:29
And, I declared that I had the history of COVID-19 and, they immediately put on the shield and, uh, the doctor said that he rejects to see me.
19:43
And they told me to go to ANE, even I being discharged for three months and I had no traveling history.
19:53
But I, I can just go to A&E and the, when I arrived, I stayed the whole night to, to get to test again.
20:01
because I had the history.
20:03
Yes.
20:03
But, it's, it's turned out.
20:05
It's just a normal cold.
20:07  Kecheng Fang
Can you explain a little bit about the GP and A&E?
20:10  Wenni
General practitioner, GP, and, A&E is accident and emergency
20:15  Kecheng Fang
Are they in public hospitals?
20:18  Wenni
The GP is in private clinic.
20:21
And, A&E is in public hospitals.
20:25  Kecheng Fang
So the public hospital cannot reject any, patients based on this, but private clinics have the right to do that.
20:32  Wenni
Yes.
20:33
But I need to wait for whole night to get a test in the public hospital.
20:40  Kecheng Fang
Did you have any, discrimination experienced, Dominic?
20:44  Dominic
Yeah.
20:44
Yeah.
20:44
I, I think, it's, it's understandable because it's a new virus and you don't know, like, you know, it could cause death in certain cases.
20:51
So I think it's understandable that people are worried.
20:54
People are scared, people are afraid, you know?
20:56
So, I know, I remember one experience where, our neighbors, like they, they saw me coming out.
21:03
And they were also opening the door there.
21:06
They saw me, they slammed the door immediately.
21:08
They went back to their own home.
21:09
I think it's understandable.
21:11
So I don't really blame them.
21:12
So they're still because you don't know what would happen.
21:15
And there are cases with, virus coming back with some survivors.
21:19  Kecheng Fang
Our podcast actually focuses on change, this pandemic changed many things.
21:25
So talk a little about your original plan for this year.
21:28
It was, immigrating to Canada, right?
21:31
To starting a new life in Canada.
21:33
so what was the change to your life plan for this year?
21:38
And maybe in future are you still planning to go to Canada?
21:41  Wenni
We'll still go to Canada, but not this year, we postponed the plan since, the unemployment rate in Canada is quite high.
21:52
We, so we are worried.
21:55
We can't find a job there.
21:57
So, we leased our house, for one year and to see how it goes next year.
22:06  Kecheng Fang
so you are currently, working in Hong Kong now.
22:10  Wenni
Yes.
22:10
Yes.
22:10
So we, we decided to stay in Hong Kong for, this year.
22:28  Kecheng Fang
So what's your day like now in Hong Kong, what's a typical day like?
22:32  Wenni
Both of us are now working as social worker, so we need to see our client,
22:39
but due to the COVID-19, we now work from home for like two to three days every week.
22:48
And to go to office for two days per week.
22:53
but mostly we just talk with our clients via phone.
22:59
We used to meet them face to face.
23:02
but now we are not encouraged to do so.
23:05  Kecheng Fang
Yeah, because starting from early July, there was a new wave of, this pandemic in Hong Kong.
23:11
So how do both of you think about this, current status of this pandemic in Hong Kong?
23:18  Dominic
I should even feel very fatigue about it because it's been, it's been a long, long time.
23:24
So there's no end to this.
23:26
Like we don't see an end to this.
23:28
So, we just have to be extra careful every single day.
23:32
Every time we wash our hands, wear a mask.
23:36
but you know, it's, it's, it's getting more and more difficult because you have to stay home all the time and tried to get work done, but it's not as effective.
23:45
So, it it's, it's getting, you know, really retired and we really hope that this will all blow over very soon.
23:51  Kecheng Fang
What's your opinion, Wenni?
23:53  Wenni
Actually I think it's a failure of the government's policy, which caused the new wave.
24:00
some of my friends, they came to Hong Kong from mainland China.
24:05
They didn't need to do any test before they came to Hong Kong and they can stay home with a family member.
24:15
But their family members they're free to go to everywhere.
24:19
So I think that's why, there is a new wave.
24:23  Kecheng Fang
But, people also saying that if you really want to get more stricter regulations on people's daily life, then it will cause a lot of inconvenience.
24:32
Right?
24:33
So actually it seems that it's quite efficient for mainland China government to control the pandemic.
24:40
Especially for example, recently starting from June, the recent wave in Beijing, and it was a controlled
24:46
quite quickly, but of course the cost is that, many people did not have the freedom to go out at all.
24:54
So what do you think of this, balance between controlling the pandemic effectively and also not disturbing the ordinary people's lives?
25:06  Wenni
Actually I don't know why China can do that.
25:10
it's impossible for us to not go out for, for a period of time.
25:16  Kecheng Fang
Yeah, they can literally lock people's doors.
25:18
Right.
25:20  Wenni
yes.
25:20
I don't know, but it's, it's definitely what I, it's not what I want.
25:25
And I think it's hard to use this method in, in Hong Kong.
25:32
In Hong Kong we have the stress of survive.
25:37
Especially with, cause I was working as a social work.
25:41
I see some people say they need to work or they can't survive.
25:47  Kecheng Fang
do you have any, like, other thoughts to share with, with our audience, especially from your own experience?
25:56  Wenni
Actually I posted my reflection of the experience online and recently some people, they
26:06
come to contact me because they are suspected or they are diagnosed with COVID-19 recently.
26:15
So I think most of them are very scared.
26:19
So I want to tell whoever listening to this, if you are suspected, if you are
26:29
diagnosed, do not be so panic or do not be so scared .Most of us can survive the virus.
26:38  Kecheng Fang
And you can get, actually get positive things out of it.
26:40  Wenni
Yes.
26:41  Dominic
So for me, I would say, first of all, I think, this virus has been going on for some time now, but now is not the time to relax.
26:49
Keep doing a safety measure, wash your hands, you know, wear a cover.
26:53
If possible, keep social distancing.
26:55
I think, it's a long battle.
26:57
It's a long battle and, you just really have to hold the defense, you know, even now.
27:03
I know it's hard to bear, but you really need to hold on because you never know when you will get it.
27:08
Like for us, we don't know exactly how we got it, but we got it.
27:11
So, you always have to be cautious, you know, and second of all, I think at sometimes it's also good to stop and kind of reflect on your life.
27:20
Like, what do you truly value?
27:22
What is important for you?
27:24
Are you really doing the, working towards what you value or you're working towards your goal or just letting life getting by?
27:30
You know, these are some really good questions, important questions, which I reflected on when I was in the hospital alone.
27:38  Kecheng Fang
Okay.
27:38
Good.
27:39
Thank you.
27:39
I will be talking with you after two to three months to see what's your life will be during that time.
27:44
And how will our world will be after two to three months.
28:34
This was episode two with Kecheng Fang.
28:34
Stay tuned.for the following episode of Record of Change when we will hear Rey in Manilla.
28:34
Rey is a flight attendant at Philippines Airlines.
28:34
As very few flights were allowedduring the lockdown in the Phillippines, Rey took on side jobs as a barista at a coffee shop and a disinfection officer.
28:34
Follow us on your favourite podcast provider, and find out more about the stories behind on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube or our website, recordofchange.com.
28:35
This podcast is implemented by and with members of the Bosch Alumni Network.