Buzzcast

Buzzcast is a roundtable discussion about podcasting from the people at Buzzsprout. We'll cover current events and news, podcast strategy, tools we are using, and dip into the Customer Support mailbag to test our podcasting knowledge. If you want to stay up-to-date on what's working in podcasting, Buzzcast is the show for you.

https://buzzcast.buzzsprout.com/

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episode 51: How I Built This: Buzzsprout [transcript]


In this special edition of Buzzcast, hear from Buzzsprout's cofounders Tom and Kevin as they recount how the company was first started, important decisions that shaped the culture at Buzzsprout, and why the future is bright for podcasting.

Special shoutout to the podcast that inspired the format for this week's special episode, "How I Built This with Guy Raz."

Join us inside the Buzzsprout Podcast Community on Facebook to let us know if we should do more fun episodes like this in the future.

Review Buzzcast in Podchaser or Apple Podcasts to let us know what you think of the show.

Buzzsprout's Dynamic Content tool now allows you to save multiple clips in your Dynamic Content Library and track how many downloads each clip receives. Learn more on our New Features page.


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 2021-05-10  43m
 
 
00:00  Tom
I'm 99% sure that we'd
00:00
already registered Buzzsprout
00:04
just as a prospect for a product
00:04
in the future, something about
00:07
Buzzsprout It sounded, you know,
00:07
like buzz that it would be
00:11
something that people wanted to
00:11
talk about sprout kind of sounds
00:13
like a movement. So that was
00:13
where it came from.
00:17  Travis
You're listening to
00:17
Buzzcast. The podcast takes you
00:19
behind the scenes of what's
00:19
going on in the podcasting
00:21
industry, and breaks down what
00:21
it means for you as an
00:24
independent podcast creator. I'm
00:24
Travis Albritton. Now, it's hard
00:28
to imagine podcasting before its
00:28
current form, that now it seems
00:34
like every one of their brother
00:34
is starting a podcast. But if
00:38
you rewind just 15 years, that
00:38
was not necessarily the case
00:42
that there weren't podcast
00:42
hosting companies like
00:44
Buzzsprout that you could simply
00:44
sign up for. And then they would
00:47
just take care of everything
00:47
else. You had to learn how to
00:49
encode your own RSS feed, you
00:49
had to store your file
00:52
somewhere, you had to make sure
00:52
that everything was formatted
00:54
correctly, that you had
00:54
everything tagged with
00:57
enclosures. And yeah, it was a
00:57
lot. So you can imagine when
01:01
people were just getting into
01:01
podcasting in its very early
01:05
stages, that there were a lot of
01:05
things to figure out. And one of
01:09
those early podcast hosts was
01:09
Buzzsprout. So in this episode,
01:13
we wanted to do a nice little
01:13
behind the scenes, how I built
01:16
this journey into the past, to
01:16
hear from Kevin and Tom, two of
01:20
the co founders of Buzzsprout,
01:20
about not only how Buzzsprout
01:23
came to be, but even how they
01:23
met. So Kevin, what was your
01:28
recollection of how you and Tom
01:28
initially met, way back in the
01:33
90s, before you were working
01:33
together and before Buzzsprout
01:36
was even a company,
01:37  Kevin
the history of Tom and I
01:37
had as a very funny, an
01:41
interesting kind of meeting. We
01:41
met when I was still in college,
01:44
he was a few years out of
01:44
college. And we met at a I went
01:49
to University of Florida, so did
01:49
he, there's a young life
01:51
property, which is like a summer
01:51
camp for youth, a couple of
01:55
hours outside of Gainesville.
01:55
And I would go over there and
01:59
just work weekends doing, you
01:59
know, property maintenance stuff
02:02
or whatever. Anyway, Tom was
02:02
involved in young life as well
02:04
at the time. So we met one
02:04
weekend at this property. And I
02:08
had a motorcycle at the time,
02:08
because if you know anything
02:10
about University of Florida,
02:10
there's no way to park a car. So
02:13
if you're able, most a lot of
02:13
students get motorcycles or
02:16
scooters or something. The point
02:16
is, is that Tom had a motorcycle
02:19
again when he was in college,
02:19
and he had since gotten rid of
02:21
it. saw me drive up on a
02:21
motorcycle and he's like, Oh my
02:24
gosh, man, I haven't run a
02:24
motorcycle in a couple years.
02:26
Can I take yours for a spin
02:27  Unknown
motorcycle, and
02:29  Kevin
Tom being the salesman
02:29
that he is somehow, in a span of
02:32
five minutes convinced me to
02:32
hand over the keys to my
02:34
motorcycle and he was gone. Like
02:34
out of the property gone. I had
02:38
no idea this guy was. So another
02:38
guy who I know happened to be
02:43
there that weekend walks up a
02:43
few minutes later. He's like,
02:45
what are you doing out here in
02:45
the parking lot? I'm like, man,
02:46
I just got here. Some guy who I
02:46
just met, convinced me to take
02:50
my motorcycle and he's gone. And
02:50
he was supposed to be back in
02:53
five minutes. It's now been 10.
02:53
I don't know where he is. He's
02:56
like, Who is this guy? I don't
02:56
know. He said his name was Tom.
02:59
He has, you know, brown hair.
02:59
He's like, wait, was it Tom
03:02
Rossi? I was like, yeah. And
03:02
then he's like, Oh, my gosh,
03:06
that guy's got you know, he's
03:06
he's crazy. Like, you'd be
03:08
ridiculous. You never want to
03:08
learn him your motorcycle. So
03:11
I'm freaking out. I'm like, What
03:11
did I just do? Anyway, Tom comes
03:15
back a few minutes later, he's
03:15
like, actually ran out of gas
03:17
took me a while to figure out
03:17
where the reserve tank was sorry
03:19
about that. I'm like, okay, I
03:19
thought you like stole my bike.
03:23
And that's, that's how we met.
03:23
But they were all just messing
03:26
with me. Tom's obviously a great
03:26
guy, not somebody who would
03:27
steal your motorcycle. And that
03:27
was the beginning of a
03:31
friendship. That's been 25 plus
03:31
years. I mean, I don't know
03:34
exactly how many years but yeah,
03:34
a long time.
03:36  Travis
Yeah, that is definitely
03:36
a very interesting story of how
03:40
the two of you guys met. Now, I
03:40
know not too long after that you
03:44
started working together, in
03:44
during the 90s during the early
03:48
days of the internet, but before
03:48
the.com bubble burst. So Tom,
03:53
tell me a little bit about what
03:53
that work was like before you
03:57
were working on Buzzsprout.
03:57
before you're working on some of
03:59
these other products that we
03:59
currently have within kind of
04:02
the broader company. What kind
04:02
of work were you doing? And what
04:06
was that, like on a day to day
04:06
basis,
04:09  Tom
we were doing Client
04:09
Services. So this was early on
04:14
in the internet age, where
04:14
people were just starting to
04:18
understand the importance of
04:18
having a website. And we were
04:23
basically just contracting
04:23
ourselves out, to do design work
04:27
and to build to build websites
04:27
for people. But what we really
04:31
wanted to do was more than just
04:31
brochures, we wanted to build
04:36
applications. And so we would
04:36
take on very complicated
04:39
projects, building an interface,
04:39
user experience around some type
04:45
of application. And those are
04:45
the kinds of projects that we
04:47
took on. So when Kevin came on
04:47
board, Kevin came on and really
04:52
led all that design work. My
04:52
background had been more on the
04:56
technical side, and just the
04:56
nature of client services, most
04:59
of my time. was spent actually
04:59
doing sales. So you're
05:02
constantly getting the next
05:02
client. So you'd build this
05:05
wonderful application, you'd
05:05
hand over the keys to your
05:09
customer. And then, you know,
05:09
maybe they contact you every
05:12
once in a while to add more
05:12
features or, or do something
05:15
else. But that's kind of the
05:15
existence that we had. At the
05:18
beginning. It was really trying
05:18
to find our way and figure out
05:21
what was what was going to
05:21
happen as this as the industry
05:24
matured. Yeah,
05:26  Kevin
we I mean, we would do
05:26
just about anything, like when
05:29
you're in Client Services work,
05:29
we had projects that we would,
05:33
you know, we'd liked more than
05:33
others. But if somebody came,
05:36
and we were capable of doing it,
05:36
really how much we like doing
05:40
that type of work was it was a
05:40
very small part of the equation.
05:43
Because that business, at least
05:43
our experience in it was like
05:47
feast or famine, like, it seemed
05:47
like we had clients knocking
05:50
down our door, and we just
05:50
didn't have the time to get it
05:51
done. Or there was no work
05:51
available, and no matter where
05:55
we looked high and low. And so
05:55
in order to survive and work in
06:00
a business like that, you can't
06:00
be too picky, like it comes down
06:04
to, are we capable of doing the
06:04
work? Do they have the budget to
06:06
make it a profitable project for
06:06
us? And then if so, how can we
06:09
make this happen, schedule wise
06:09
with the resources that we have
06:12
available? And sometimes, you
06:12
know, that means you got to add
06:14
people to the team. When the
06:14
work isn't there. Unfortunately,
06:17
you have to figure out what do
06:17
you do with these resources when
06:20
there's not billable work for
06:20
them? But yeah, we took on
06:24
everything from marketing
06:24
websites to web application work
06:27
to telephony systems, which is
06:27
like phone systems integrated
06:30
with websites and everything in
06:30
between. No mobile development
06:34
back then mobile phones weren't
06:34
a thing. But if it was, if it
06:37
was online, whether it be
06:37
advertising related or more
06:40
software side, we honed our
06:40
skills and learn how to do all
06:43
that stuff.
06:44  Travis
So he started off by
06:44
doing Client Services work for
06:47
individuals and companies
06:47
building web applications. What
06:50
made you shift to more of a
06:50
product focused business model?
06:55
Was there anything in particular
06:55
any major events that really
06:58
forced your hand in a way? Or
06:58
was it something that just came
07:01
naturally as the company
07:01
evolved, and as you learned more
07:05
about what the internet was
07:05
turning into?
07:08  Tom
Yeah, we had built the
07:08
company around Client Services.
07:13
And we worked half of our
07:13
customers, about half were
07:17
nonprofits. And about half were
07:17
for profits, we wanted to make
07:20
an impact we wanted. When we
07:20
started the company, it was
07:23
about helping businesses, and
07:23
nonprofits understand the impact
07:28
of the Internet, and how it was
07:28
going to change the way that
07:31
they do business online. So we
07:31
wanted to always work with both
07:35
for profit, and nonprofit
07:35
customers. So as a result, about
07:39
50% of our customers were
07:39
nonprofit. So September 11,
07:44
happens, and it just devastates
07:44
it. I mean, it devastates
07:47
everyone, because they're trying
07:47
to figure out what what's going
07:51
to happen. I mean, there was
07:51
talk about whether Wall Street
07:55
was gonna be next, and whether
07:55
the stock market was gonna stop.
08:00
And anybody who was considering
08:00
a capital expenditure, which is
08:04
everything that we did,
08:04
everything that we did was a
08:06
capital expense for their
08:06
building an application. So in
08:10
order for them to pay for that,
08:10
that's a capital expense, which
08:13
are the first things to kind of
08:13
go when you're nervous about the
08:17
future. And so all all of our
08:17
customers and potential
08:20
customers, they just froze
08:20
everything. And so I'm sitting
08:23
on an exceptional staff. And at
08:23
that time, Kevin is leading all
08:27
of our web development, both the
08:27
design and the programming, he's
08:30
leading the whole department,
08:30
and we don't have a lot of
08:34
prospects. So we had some ideas
08:34
for things that we wanted to
08:38
build. And that became our first
08:38
product, because everybody's got
08:41
it. Everybody's got to do
08:41
something, got to come in the
08:43
office and, and, and do
08:43
something. So that's actually we
08:46
got forced into really building
08:46
that first product.
08:50  Kevin
Yeah, it's so m sites was
08:50
the thing. But while I was still
08:53
an employee, under Tom's
08:53
original company, and we started
08:58
building that, and it, you know,
08:58
in the SAS world, when you build
09:02
the software products, sometimes
09:02
they take a while before they
09:05
start generating any significant
09:05
revenue. And so we were building
09:08
that at the same time, we
09:08
continue to do client service
09:10
work. And things were slowing
09:10
down this way the economy was
09:15
slowing down. This was right and
09:15
post 911. A lot of our customers
09:18
were in the nonprofit space. And
09:18
so nonprofits tightened up
09:20
because they were very concerned
09:20
as the economy turned down, what
09:24
that was going to do to their
09:24
support, their financial
09:27
resources, resources that were
09:27
coming in. And so Tom was having
09:31
to slowly make some really hard
09:31
decisions about his company, and
09:35
how many staff he was going to
09:35
be able to keep on and just due
09:39
to the type of person that I am
09:39
in nature of my relationship
09:42
with Tom like, I never, I just
09:42
couldn't envision that
09:46
conversation like Tom and I
09:46
having a conversation about I
09:50
can't afford to keep you on
09:50
staff. And so I didn't want to
09:54
leave but I felt like you know,
09:54
it was just a really hard point
09:59
in the business and, and one of
09:59
my best friends in the whole
10:02
world was in charge of this
10:02
thing. And so I had an
10:05
opportunity to take a job at an
10:05
advertising agency, which is
10:08
what I studied in college, and I
10:08
never got an opportunity to
10:10
really explore. So I decided to
10:10
take it, which again, led to
10:14
another really hard conversation
10:14
with Tom letting know, you know,
10:17
before you have to let me go,
10:17
I'm going to leave, and I don't
10:20
want to, but we handled it as
10:20
best we could and remained
10:24
really close friends. And so I
10:24
took that job and did it for a
10:28
couple years. m sites was built
10:28
and functioning at the time, but
10:31
it was slowly starting to
10:31
produce enough income, where
10:35
that could sustain one or two
10:35
people. And so while that's
10:39
happening, Tom is doing that all
10:39
by himself, basically, at this
10:42
point. And I was just working a
10:42
job in the ad ad agency down in
10:46
Miami, keeping in touch with Tom
10:46
and I started developing an idea
10:49
for another product while I was
10:49
down there a time tracking
10:52
product. And so the two of us
10:52
kept in touch. And it finally
10:57
got to the point where M Seitz
10:57
was making enough money where he
10:59
felt like he could support not
10:59
just him, but maybe him plus
11:03
somebody else. I had this idea
11:03
for tech, which I'd gone pretty
11:06
far, at least on the front end
11:06
side of developing, but I didn't
11:09
have the backend built. So we
11:09
said, you know, like, it's gonna
11:13
be hard on both of us, Tom took
11:13
on some extra part time work to
11:17
make ends meet, but we decided
11:17
to go for it. And bootstrap a
11:21
new company together the two of
11:21
us as partners with an app that
11:24
couldn't support two people. And
11:24
another app that wasn't even
11:28
built yet. But let's let's go
11:28
for it. So pretty much sold, and
11:34
liquidated, everything we had
11:34
and moved into, you know, humble
11:37
abodes and worked out of home
11:37
offices, and decided to start
11:41
the software company that we
11:41
were going to build our own
11:43
products, and not take outside
11:43
work and just focus on building
11:47
software and see if we could
11:47
make it work.
11:49  Travis
So at what point was
11:49
Buzzsprout born? So you've
11:53
started working with these, you
11:53
know, nonprofits and church
11:56
groups, and creating products
11:56
and resources for them since
12:00
that was a big part of your
12:00
client base at the time. When
12:03
did Buzzsprout come on the
12:03
radar? When did you guys decide?
12:07
That's the next product we
12:07
should try to build? And yeah,
12:10
like, how did how did you
12:10
actually come up with the idea
12:12
for Buzzsprout?
12:13  Tom
What happened is a lot of
12:13
those campus ministries that
12:17
signed up for m sites, a lot of
12:17
those campus people went on to
12:20
become church pastors. So next
12:20
thing you know, our customer
12:24
base has changed over time as it
12:24
grows, as M sites has grown. Now
12:29
the majority of our customers
12:29
are actually churches. And so
12:31
they start reaching out and
12:31
saying, hey, I want to put my
12:33
sermons online, rather than
12:33
burning a CD, or recording a
12:39
tape. In the old days back when
12:39
you actually burned
12:42  Travis
CDs. Yes,
12:43  Tom
yeah. Seriously. The the
12:43
church that I went to had a
12:47
multi disc burner that you would
12:47
burn like 10 at a time, at the
12:52
end of the sermon, you would
12:52
just burn all these CDs, and
12:55
then you would go pass them out
12:55
to the people that you know,
12:57
weren't able to make it to the
12:57
service. So we had a lot of
13:00
people that were reaching out m
13:00
sites, customers that were
13:02
saying, I want to get my sermons
13:02
online. What do I need to do?
13:06
They didn't know the concept of
13:06
a podcast. And I didn't I don't
13:10
think I even knew. But Kevin was
13:10
the one. I'm like, do what do we
13:16
what do we tell him? What do we
13:16
do? And so he figured out how to
13:19
build an RSS feed, he wrote how
13:19
to build an RSS feed like a like
13:23
a help document, and how to
13:23
upload your files to different
13:28
just straight up file hosts, I
13:28
think in GoDaddy at one point,
13:33
but even before GoDaddy, I think
13:33
dream host and these other cheap
13:36
services that you could just
13:36
upload an mp3 to, and then he
13:39
would show them how to build an
13:39
RSS feed. But it was really
13:43
complicated. It always led to
13:43
tons of questions. And they
13:46
didn't, they didn't understand
13:46
how to how to make their mp3 is
13:50
in the right format so that
13:50
people could download them. And
13:53
so it was constantly, constantly
13:53
something that we had to update
13:56
this help article of how to get
13:56
your sermons online. So Kevin,
14:00
start saying, Well, I think we
14:00
can make this easy for them, we
14:04
could build, we could build an
14:04
app that really makes it easy
14:06
for them to just take the
14:06
recording, upload it. And then
14:09
we distribute it to all the
14:09
different, different ways that
14:12
people might want to subscribe
14:12
to that RSS feed, whether it's
14:15
with a podcast player, or even
14:15
at the time, there was tons of
14:18
RSS readers. So that is the
14:18
genesis of Buzzsprout.
14:23  Travis
Now I know one thing
14:23
that's been a calling card for
14:26
Buzzsprout, even from the very
14:26
beginning, was that it's very
14:30
easy to use that you don't have
14:30
to be technically proficient,
14:33
you don't need to be, you know,
14:33
internet savvy in any kind of
14:37
way, in order to start a podcast
14:37
and to use Buzzsprout to
14:41
distribute it. So what were the
14:41
some of the decisions that were
14:44
made in creating the products
14:44
Buzzsprout that were different
14:49
than what other companies were
14:49
doing at the time in order to
14:51
make it more user friendly?
14:51
Yeah. And
14:54  Kevin
so there was a couple
14:54
things that we did a couple
14:57
decisions that we made early on
14:57
to really hone in on that focus.
15:03
In the podcast hosting space.
15:03
Like, when you think about a
15:06
business model, you think about
15:06
what are our costs? And then
15:10
like, how much do we have to
15:10
charge for a product? So we have
15:12
some margin in there. And that's
15:12
like our profit, right? And it's
15:16
pretty easy in the hosting
15:16
space, you're sorry, you're
15:18
charged for server space, like
15:18
how many? How much space on hard
15:21
drives? Do we need to store all
15:21
these audio files? And then how
15:24
much bandwidth Do we have to pay
15:24
for for people to send them to
15:27
us in the first place, and then
15:27
for us to send them out to the
15:29
world. So that's our cost side.
15:29
And we did not want to, like
15:33
that felt too technical to us to
15:33
be able to talk about hosting in
15:38
those terms. Most hosts, Lipson
15:38
included, and maybe there was
15:42
one or two other competitors
15:42
that were starting to pop up on
15:44
the scene, at the time, we were
15:44
developing this, we're all
15:46
talking about megabytes, they
15:46
were all talking about, you can
15:48
get 250 megabytes a month, or
15:48
500 megabytes a month for this
15:52
amount, or, you know, gigabyte,
15:52
or whatever, for this amount.
15:55
They were talking about
15:55
different bandwidth restrictions
15:58
and everything else. And we
15:58
wanted to make that really
16:00
simple. Like, at the end of the
16:00
day, who knows how much how big
16:04
my files are, you know, unless
16:04
you're really technical and
16:07
right click on your all your
16:07
files and go to info or
16:10
properties or whatever, and see
16:10
how big it is. And and if you
16:13
change the compression on it,
16:13
that could be a different size.
16:15
Well, you know, what should I
16:15
compress that? Like, is my file
16:20
bigger than it needs to be? am I
16:20
paying for a bigger package I
16:22
need? So to avoid all that
16:22
complexity and all the technical
16:24
stuff. We said, Well, what about
16:24
time, like time everyone
16:27
understands time, I got on the
16:27
phone with Travis. And we
16:30
recorded this podcast, and we
16:30
talked for 45 minutes. So if I
16:33
do that, you know, four times a
16:33
month, I don't want to push for
16:36
those episodes, I need about
16:36
three hours or so of content.
16:39
And so that was one of the
16:39
decisions that we made, is we're
16:42
going to sell our plans based on
16:42
time, we're not going to sell
16:45
them based on megabytes. Like,
16:45
we're just going to make it as
16:48
simple as possible for people to
16:48
think about what plan do I need?
16:51
Well, how long do you want to
16:51
talk every month? How much audio
16:54
Do you want to push up? So that
16:54
was one thing. I mean, another
16:57
thing that we made, and I just
16:57
touched on it briefly was the
17:00
idea of like compressing a file,
17:00
like if I record a file with you
17:03
and hit save and export and save
17:03
it to my desktop. I shouldn't
17:07
have to worry about is that in
17:07
the right format? Is that saved
17:11
as an mp3 at 96k mana or 190 2k?
17:11
stereo? Or 120 8k? stereo? Or
17:17
should it be a file? Or who
17:17
knows? Like mp4 there's there's
17:22
a million different ways to save
17:22
an audio file. So which is the
17:25
right one, which is the best
17:25
one? How am I going to sound is
17:27
it going to be you know, too
17:27
compressed or not compressed
17:30
enough and all that other stuff.
17:30
So we said you know what, let's
17:32
let's help our customers out
17:32
with that as well. Let's let
17:35
them upload any type of audio
17:35
file as long as it's a valid
17:38
audio file or a video file. And
17:38
we'll just compress it into the
17:42
right format for podcasting. And
17:42
so that was another thing that
17:45
was that was very different than
17:45
what other people were doing.
17:48
Other people were saying log
17:48
into the FTP site and drag and
17:51
drop your files in there. But
17:51
whatever you give us is what
17:54
we're going to serve. Sometimes
17:54
that works. Sometimes it
17:57
doesn't, it makes the podcaster
17:57
have to have a certain level of
18:00
technical expertise that we were
18:00
trying to avoid. Again, like
18:04
everyone, and anyone should be
18:04
able to podcast without having
18:06
to sit down and read podcasting
18:06
for dummies or go through white
18:11
papers or other technical
18:11
resources.
18:13  Travis
Well, as someone who
18:13
started podcasting with
18:16
Buzzsprout, I'm grateful I
18:16
didn't have to learn about FTP
18:19
sites or anything like that.
18:19
Now, I want to fast forward a
18:22
few years after the creation of
18:22
Buzzsprout, I believe in 2009 to
18:27
the year 2014, which I know is a
18:27
big turning point in Buzzsprout.
18:31
History. And that was the first
18:31
year that we the collective we
18:37
Buzzsprout. We sent someone from
18:37
the company to podcast movement
18:42
that it was the first year of
18:42
podcast movement, the
18:44
conference. And that was it was
18:44
at this conference that
18:49
Buzzsprout really took on a life
18:49
of its own. So tell me a little
18:51
bit about that story. And what
18:51
happened at podcast movement
18:56
that year that had such a big
18:56
impact on Buzzsprout.
18:59  Tom
Sure. So again, Buzzsprout
18:59
is a very fun product to work
19:04
on. But it does not generate the
19:04
it's just not as profitable as
19:09
some of our other products. But
19:09
it's so much more fun.
19:12  Travis
And so are you talking
19:12
about at the time or even
19:15
currently
19:15  Tom
at the time? Oh, well,
19:15
definitely. Yeah, no, it's true
19:19
today. But now it's great. Now,
19:19
it's the only thing that we work
19:22
on. But at the time, you know,
19:22
we had other products, we have
19:24
other competing interests. And
19:24
so when you think about how do I
19:27
grow the business, how do I how
19:27
do I continue to do what we do
19:33
Buzzsprout was not the first
19:33
thing that you would go to, you
19:36
would think, oh, we need to grow
19:36
these other areas. But anybody
19:39
who did business development
19:39
wanted to work on Buzzsprout. So
19:44
we wanted to just explore could
19:44
Buzzsprout get to a place where
19:48
it would be really profitable
19:48
for us to spend time in. I don't
19:51
go Kevin doesn't go to this
19:51
conference. But one of the guys
19:55
on the team who wanted to
19:55
explore growing by Buzzsprout
20:00
he's convinced that if we go to
20:00
a conference that like this
20:03
could be a way for us to do
20:03
that. And so he goes, and he
20:06
brings john, who's our most
20:06
senior developer, but john, very
20:10
personable, and so he wants to
20:10
go, he wants to just meet
20:13
podcasters. And we're thinking
20:13
you guys are gonna go, but
20:15
you're gonna get there. And
20:15
everybody's gonna know who
20:18
Buzzsprout is, they're already
20:18
using Buzzsprout. Because how
20:21
many podcasts are there? I mean,
20:21
come on, really. And so we're
20:24
thinking that they're going to
20:24
go and they're just exploring
20:26
this idea of, could we? Could we
20:26
really grow Buzzsprout? Could it
20:29
grow into something bigger? And
20:29
is it worth our business
20:32
development resources, they go
20:32
to this conference, expecting to
20:36
see tons of our customers there,
20:36
and they get there. And no one
20:40
knows whose Buzzsprout is, no
20:40
one knows who Buzzsprout is. So
20:44
they go, and they're talking to
20:44
people. And they're still kind
20:48
of entrenched in an older way of
20:48
thinking about podcasting. Like
20:52
they're doing really technical
20:52
things that Buzzsprout has
20:56
solved. Like, you don't have to
20:56
do that anymore. Like you can
20:59
focus on content. Buzzsprout
20:59
makes your life so much easier.
21:02
And so they go and they start
21:02
talking to different people, and
21:05
they start exploring it and they
21:05
come back with the report of
21:07
guys. No one knows who
21:07
Buzzsprout is, there was two
21:10
ways to receive that report.
21:10
Right? is one is your a failure.
21:13
Nobody knows who you are. or
21:13
two, oh my gosh, the opportunity
21:17
is so much greater than you've
21:17
given it credit for. And we
21:20
really did feel, oh my gosh, the
21:20
opportunity for Buzzsprout is
21:25
much greater than we ever
21:25
expected. And so that was when
21:28
we kind of justified spending
21:28
more, it's still experimental,
21:32
because we don't know can we
21:32
really grow Buzzsprout? can we
21:36
can we figure out how to crack
21:36
that nut. And we were excited
21:41
because the payoff would be so
21:41
much better, because it's a
21:43
product that we really enjoyed
21:43
working on. And so that's what
21:47
we did is we started working on
21:47
selling Buzzsprout more how Who
21:52
are these people? Why don't they
21:52
know about Buzzsprout? So we
21:54
started going to the
21:54
conferences, and really engaging
21:57
in the community in a different
21:57
way than we had in the past.
22:00
Okay, so
22:00  Travis
you get back from that
22:00
podcast movement, you received
22:03
the report from john saying,
22:03
guys, the potential is here,
22:07
there are so many more people
22:07
that we didn't even know about
22:09
the we're getting into
22:09
podcasting, we should go for it.
22:12
And then that following year,
22:12
going back to podcast movement,
22:17
you wanted to come back with
22:17
more of a strategy, more of an
22:21
intention to really stand out
22:21
and try and connect with
22:24
podcasters and really start to
22:24
make a name for Buzzsprout in
22:27
the industry. So Kevin, I know
22:27
that you and Alban created this
22:32
recording booth, something that
22:32
Buzzsprout really become known
22:36
for, from conference to
22:36
conference that this recording
22:40
booth almost in a way became
22:40
synonymous with how people
22:42
thought about Buzzsprout. So
22:42
tell me a little bit about the
22:45
origin of the booth, where it
22:45
came from, why you built it. And
22:50
what the early responses were
22:50
when people saw the booth at
22:54
these podcasts conferences.
22:56  Kevin
Yeah, the story of the
22:56
recording booth. It's you know,
22:58
it started off with just a
22:58
brainstorm session between Alban
23:02
Brooke and myself, of we're
23:02
gonna go to these conferences,
23:05
how do we stand out? Right,
23:05
there's a couple different ways
23:07
to stand out one you can you can
23:07
spend a ton of money and buy a
23:10
huge sponsorship package, but we
23:10
didn't have money to spend like
23:14
that at that time. And so what
23:14
else can we do? Well, we can
23:17
give out some cool t shirts.
23:17
Yeah, we're gonna do t shirts,
23:19
we're gonna make a nice t
23:19
shirts. You can give out swag
23:22
and all this other kind of
23:22
stuff. Again, our experience is
23:25
most of that stuff goes in the
23:25
trash. So what can we do to
23:28
differentiate ourselves? And we
23:28
thought, well, it would be
23:30
really great. If we're at a
23:30
podcasting conference. What do
23:33
people do at a podcasting
23:33
conference, they meet other
23:35
podcasters they network, they
23:35
probably want to have them on
23:38
their show. And a lot of them
23:38
probably try to connect after
23:42
like, give me your Give me your
23:42
information. I'll connect with
23:44
you afterwards, I do a recording
23:44
session. Well, what about just
23:47
how about, we hop in this booth
23:47
right now and just record it
23:49
while we're here. Like this is
23:49
where the energy is where the
23:52
vibe is happening. I'm feeling
23:52
in the moment right now let's go
23:55
record. So we wanted to, like
23:55
that felt fun, I felt exciting.
23:59
It felt like that's a much
23:59
better way to spend a little bit
24:02
of money and time to provide
24:02
this fun experience and a way to
24:06
stand out. And so Alvin and I
24:06
started sketching ideas on a
24:09
piece of paper and we started
24:09
small from, you know, some
24:13
little plexiglass dividers that
24:13
we could set up on a desktop.
24:17
And somehow that morphed into
24:17
Alvin and I spending about a
24:19
week building a huge podcasting
24:19
studio. So you know, just mark
24:24
that down under the list of
24:24
skills that you have to have to
24:27
be an early Buzzsprout employee
24:27
is carpentry is evidently pretty
24:30
important. Albert and I decided
24:30
to go to Home Depot and buy
24:34
seven door panels because we
24:34
felt like that those were the
24:37
right size. And we would hinge
24:37
them all together and make a
24:40
big, like, basically a portable
24:40
room so you could pop it up and
24:45
spring these doors up and if you
24:45
put it up against a wall, you
24:47
have a room and then the three
24:47
center doors we cut out big
24:50
holes and filled them with
24:50
plexiglass so people could have
24:53
some visibility into what's
24:53
going on behind this big wall.
24:55
And the people inside could look
24:55
out and then we bought some, you
24:59
know, pretty much prosumer level
24:59
recording equipment. So we
25:03
bought some audio interfaces and
25:03
some nice dynamic mics and some
25:06
nice boom arms and assembled
25:06
this whole thing and put some
25:09
signage on the front of it, you
25:09
know, Buzzsprout recording
25:12
studio, I think we actually
25:12
called the first one podcast
25:14
movement recording studio
25:14
sponsored by Buzzsprout. Because
25:17
again, funds were tight. And so
25:17
we were trying to make deals. So
25:20
we called podcast movement. And
25:20
we're like, we want to do this
25:21
big thing, but we don't have
25:21
enough money to buy a big enough
25:24
booth. How about you, you know,
25:24
give us a deal on the space,
25:27
we'll bring the booth we'll work
25:27
together. And so they were
25:29
awesome and supportive and loved
25:29
the idea. And we made it happen.
25:33
So we built it from scratch. And
25:33
what's funny is so many people
25:36
at the conference came up and
25:36
they're like, tell us about what
25:38
you do. And we're like, well,
25:38
we're podcasting host, you know,
25:40
it's, it's, you know, $12 a
25:40
month, it's really simple to
25:43
use, and they're like, Oh,
25:43
that's great. That's great. But
25:45
how do I get the booth, I want
25:45
to buy the booth. We're like,
25:47
well, we don't sell podcasting
25:47
boots. They're like, why not?
25:51
That's what you should totally
25:51
be selling. This is amazing.
25:54  Travis
No, no, no, you're
25:55  Kevin
missing it. We don't.
25:55
Not. Were you by podcasting
25:58
booth.
25:58  Travis
Yeah, I can attest,
25:58
having set up the booth a couple
26:00
of times, I'm really grateful
26:00
that we're in the software
26:03
business, and that we just get
26:03
to focus on helping podcasters
26:07
instead of making mobile
26:07
recording studio, that's a whole
26:10
whole different animal. So we've
26:10
gone to several conferences at
26:14
this point in the story of
26:14
Buzzsprout. And now other
26:18
podcast hosts are starting to
26:18
pop up on the scene, podcasting
26:21
is becoming more mainstream
26:21
cereal, the podcast has really
26:24
broken through, and people are
26:24
starting to take podcasting more
26:28
seriously. And I know that's
26:28
within the last couple of years,
26:32
we've made a pretty intentional
26:32
shifts in the way that we think
26:36
about Buzzsprout. And the way
26:36
that we work on Buzzsprout as a
26:39
product, and how we talk about
26:39
it to our customers and to
26:42
people who are interested in
26:42
starting podcasts. Kevin, can
26:45
you tell me a little bit about
26:45
that shift like why we made that
26:49
shift away from simply being an
26:49
easy way to start podcasting and
26:54
into something that we could
26:54
grow into potentially,
26:57  Kevin
right, while in the
26:57
market changed significantly.
27:01
And what we're interested in
27:01
doing is solving problems that
27:05
other people aren't. And so when
27:05
we launched Buzzsprout, being a
27:10
simple way for podcasters to
27:10
launch their podcast was
27:13
different. And over time, there
27:13
are other competitors that
27:18
popped on the scene, and
27:18
provided their own simple
27:21
solutions, right. And I'm not
27:21
saying that, like they copied us
27:24
or anything like they were
27:24
unique in their approach. But
27:27
they were solving the same
27:27
problem. And they were doing a
27:29
pretty good job of it. Of
27:29
course, I'm biased, I think that
27:31
we did the best job of it. But
27:31
that was me, right? So there's
27:35
different flavors of people
27:35
solving the same problem. And
27:37
they were all kind of relatively
27:37
good. So like we weren't
27:40
satisfied with that we didn't
27:40
want to continue to compete and
27:43
play the same game against all
27:43
these other people that were
27:45
coming into the space trying to
27:45
solve the same problem. And so
27:48
just being kind of creators by
27:48
nature, we said, well, what's
27:51
another problem that podcasters
27:51
have, that we can help them
27:55
solve, and if anybody has
27:55
stepped in the podcasting for
27:59
any amount of time, you realize,
27:59
well, the hurdle of entry in the
28:03
podcasting is now pretty low.
28:03
You know, Buzzsprout, might have
28:06
been one of the first to make it
28:06
simple. But there's lots of
28:08
options now that are pretty
28:08
simple to get a podcast started.
28:11
So what's the next challenge,
28:11
and the next challenge that we
28:14
were excited about helping
28:14
people solve was to grow a
28:17
professional show to some level
28:17
of success defined by the
28:22
individual creator. So for some
28:22
people that might be, I just
28:26
want to be able to make a larger
28:26
impact on the world, you know,
28:29
get more downloads, get more
28:29
exposure, but it's still a hobby
28:32
for me, like I'm not looking to
28:32
monetize, I'm not looking to
28:34
grow influence, I just want to
28:34
get my message out to as many
28:37
people as possible. Another goal
28:37
could be like, I want to be a
28:40
full time professional
28:40
podcaster, I want to make income
28:42
from this, I want to get on the
28:42
biggest stages in front of the
28:46
biggest people and build a name
28:46
for myself in the space. So if
28:49
that's kind of the spectrum of
28:49
goals, regardless of where your
28:52
goal falls in there, we want to
28:52
help you achieve it. And so that
28:56
was a shift that I think
28:56
occurred probably in 2018 2019,
29:01
that was being refined, but in
29:01
involved us creating tools to
29:06
help people regardless of where
29:06
those goals were. So lots of
29:09
marketing tools, lots of like
29:09
transcripts is a great example,
29:13
writing transcript tools for
29:13
people to be able to make their
29:16
show accessible to a larger
29:16
audience, at the same time get
29:18
more of an SEO benefit, which is
29:18
kind of a marketing benefit. We
29:23
launched tools like visual
29:23
soundbite tools to be able to
29:27
promote your show on various
29:27
social media sites. We
29:30
introduced chapter marker tools.
29:30
So we started building a lot of
29:34
stuff into Buzzsprout. Like at
29:34
the core of Buzzsprout. What we
29:37
were up to that point was what's
29:37
now looked upon as kind of a
29:41
commodity which is just hosting,
29:41
right? Like anybody in the
29:44
hosting space would provide that
29:44
same service we like we call it
29:48
table stakes, which is you give
29:48
us a place to store files, and
29:52
you give us some download data
29:52
on like how many people
29:55
listened. But beyond that,
29:55
there's this huge opportunity
29:57
and that's what we've gotten
29:57
really excited about in the past
29:59
couple years. Which is how do I
29:59
create a really professional
30:02
show without having to invest
30:02
hours and hours, months years
30:07
and learning a bunch of
30:07
technology like still keeping it
30:09
simple, like still staying true
30:09
to who we are. But I want a
30:12
really professional show, I want
30:12
to be able to market it really
30:14
well. And I don't want it to
30:14
take me 40 hours a week to do
30:17
it.
30:17  Travis
Yes. And as a podcaster,
30:17
that personally uses all of
30:21
these tools not just for making
30:21
our Buzzsprout content, but for
30:24
all content and being able to
30:24
teach these tools to our
30:27
podcasters. I'm really grateful
30:27
that we've made this shift. And
30:31
it just makes it a super cool
30:31
product to work on. Right when
30:33
you're empowering and equipping
30:33
people to make amazing content
30:37
that's changing the world, you
30:37
know, not even in hyperbole, but
30:41
in real terms, changing the
30:41
world and sharing messages that
30:44
they care about. And growing
30:44
businesses. It's it's all very,
30:47
very exciting. Now, one thing
30:47
that Buzzsprout did last year,
30:52
which it was the first time I'd
30:52
ever seen someone do something
30:56
like this at any company that I
30:56
had been a part of, which is we
31:00
threw this massive party at
31:00
Disney World. So why don't you
31:04
tell us the story of
31:04
splitsville? How that party came
31:09
to be? Kevin, I want to I want
31:09
to hear from you first. And then
31:11
Tom, if you can chime in with
31:11
your perspective. Talk to me a
31:14
little bit about why we decided
31:14
to throw this massive party at
31:18
pod fest. And you know what you
31:18
were hoping to achieve by doing
31:22
it
31:22  Kevin
podcast movement, one of
31:22
the biggest conferences,
31:26
podcasts conferences in the
31:26
world. The second biggest that
31:29
I'm aware of, and I think
31:29
they've since had the largest
31:33
world's largest like virtual
31:33
conferences, pod fest. And this
31:37
one has always been near and
31:37
dear to our hearts, because it's
31:39
takes place in Florida. So it's
31:39
local conference for us. And
31:42
we've been able to just build a
31:42
great relationship with the
31:45
founder of podfest. Chris, and
31:45
we've gone to every pod fest
31:51
since this first one, I think I
31:51
don't know how many he's on. So
31:54
I'm not even gonna say but we've
31:54
done a lot of them. And so the
31:57
conference is right in our
31:57
backyard, got a great
31:59
relationship with the founder of
31:59
the conference. We're there
32:01
every year. And Buzzsprout
32:01
customer base is starting to
32:04
grow. So we thought this would
32:04
be a great opportunity to do
32:06
something special for Buzzsprout
32:06
customers, a great way to meet
32:11
them face to face, and just
32:11
thank them for for being a
32:13
customer, connect with them, get
32:13
to know them better, and just
32:17
have fun together. That's really
32:17
what we wanted to do. And so
32:19
knowing Florida, knowing the
32:19
locations knowing the menu in
32:22
the areas around, they were
32:22
having podfest right in the
32:26
backyard of Disney Springs,
32:26
which used to be Downtown
32:29
Disney. They've got this really
32:29
cool bowling alley, they're
32:31
called splitsville. And you can
32:31
rent it out for private parties.
32:35
You can have anywhere from, you
32:35
know, like three to 500 people
32:38
there, we thought that would be
32:38
a great place to get as many
32:41
Buzzsprout people together as
32:41
possible. So in February of
32:45
2020, we rented out the top
32:45
floor of splitsville and invited
32:52
any Buzzsprout customer that was
32:52
going to pod fest to come to
32:56
this party right before pod fest
32:56
kicked off later that night.
32:59  Tom
splitsville that that will
32:59
be I mean, that's just a party
33:04
that will live in infamy in the
33:04
history of our company, because
33:08
it was just, it was so much fun
33:08
to be able to celebrate with our
33:13
podcasters, we knew that the
33:13
writing was kind of on the wall
33:16
that we would would that we
33:16
would become the number one paid
33:19
post. And Kevin really wanted
33:19
to, to blow things up. He's
33:25
like, let's do let's, let's have
33:25
a party, let's celebrate with
33:27
our podcasters. And let's just
33:27
do it in an exceptional way.
33:32
We're not going to look at ROI,
33:32
we're just going to look at this
33:35
as a way to celebrate and have
33:35
fun. And, you know, let's just
33:38
let's just do it. And so Kevin,
33:38
Marshall and I are the three
33:44
partners that run the company,
33:44
and Marshall and I were like,
33:48
Kevin, we don't want to know,
33:48
just go do it. Like we don't
33:52
want just tell us how much it's
33:52
gonna cost at the end. But don't
33:55
tell us any of the details.
33:55
Because Marshall and I are not
33:57
the guys, they're gonna come up
33:57
with these fun, crazy ideas.
33:59
Whereas, you know, Kevin's
33:59
trying to figure out if we could
34:01
rent Disney World. So I think
34:01
that's, that's kind of the
34:04
dynamic that's at play with the
34:04
partners. But Kevin has this
34:07
idea of, let's have a massive
34:07
party, let's invite all of our
34:11
Buzzsprout podcasters to go. And
34:11
that was the splitsville event.
34:16
And it was it was so great. We
34:16
brought the whole team because
34:19
it was in Orlando. So the whole
34:19
team was able to go down and
34:22
walk around and talk to people
34:22
that use Buzzsprout. And it was
34:27
so encouraging. It was just,
34:27
it's an incredible experience as
34:31
a person who's I write a lot of
34:31
the code for for Buzzsprout.
34:36
You're not interacting with
34:36
customers that often and
34:39
certainly not in person. And so
34:39
that was that was just an
34:43
amazing experience. So as
34:44  Travis
we catch up to kind of
34:44
present day, it was not too long
34:48
ago, I believe, just a couple of
34:48
months ago, where Buzzsprout
34:52
crossed 100,000 active podcasts.
34:52
So 100,000 people were using
34:59
Buzzsprout To create and produce
34:59
podcast content and sharing it
35:03
with the world. And that is a
35:03
huge milestone, like it is a
35:07
huge, it is a big deal. But I
35:07
know that we don't internally
35:12
look at that number, as a
35:12
measure of success, at least the
35:16
way that we talk about
35:16
Buzzsprout. Internally, we don't
35:19
really communicate or talk about
35:19
numbers, like, you know,
35:22
revenue, or how many podcasters
35:22
are using our service. But it
35:26
is, at the same time a really
35:26
incredible and special
35:29
opportunity that we've been able
35:29
to grow Buzzsprout to this
35:32
point. So I just love to hear
35:32
from both of you. How you think
35:36
about this milestone, like what
35:36
does it mean to you to reflect
35:39
on 100,000 active podcasts, what
35:39
that means for Buzzsprout as a
35:42
company, and then also for you
35:42
individually, and how you think
35:46
about the opportunity that we
35:46
now have to make or break so
35:51
many people's podcasts?
35:53  Kevin
You know, I mean, I don't
35:53
really know what to make of it.
35:58
I mean, exactly what you said is
35:58
true. We don't we don't measure
36:02
our success by the number of
36:02
active podcasts we have. We
36:05
don't set goals, saying we want
36:05
this many new active podcasts
36:09
and this many weeks or months or
36:09
years. You know, people look at
36:13
me very get very strange look
36:13
from people when they say like,
36:16
what's what's on the horizon for
36:16
Buzzsprout, what six months,
36:19
what's a year out what's what's
36:19
the five year goal we don't,
36:22
that's just not how we operate.
36:22
We operate no more than six
36:27
weeks at a time. Now, it doesn't
36:27
mean that we don't have some
36:30
dreams are big ideas that take a
36:30
little bit more time to
36:32
formulate before they fit into
36:32
one of these six week work
36:35
cycles. But we really genuinely
36:35
work six weeks at a time and we
36:40
try to stay disciplined to that.
36:40
It's It's a weird thing to say
36:44
about yourself. But I don't
36:44
think it's because we're not
36:45
capable of it. Or because we're
36:45
simple minded people, we just
36:48
generally believe it's a waste
36:48
of time to think too far ahead.
36:52
Like when you plan six months or
36:52
a year in advance, all you're
36:56
doing is you're you're putting
36:56
chips on the betting table, and
37:01
there's no reason to put them
37:01
down yet. Like you can you can
37:04
wait a while before you put
37:04
those chips down. And the longer
37:06
you wait, the more information
37:06
you'll have. And so when we put
37:10
when we place a bet six weeks at
37:10
a time, those are very low risk
37:13
bets, right? If we miss on
37:13
everything we do in a six week
37:16
cycle, we've only we only lost
37:16
six weeks. If we put a plan that
37:20
we put a five year plan
37:20
together, and we stick to that
37:23
plan, then we get it wrong. like
37:23
think about how much you've
37:27
lost. That's a massive bet. And
37:27
so I'm super proud and excited
37:32
that we have 100,000 active
37:32
podcasts. But I'm not thinking,
37:38
Oh, well how long until we hit
37:38
200. Or how long until we hit
37:41
300. That's that's not how we
37:41
operate. how we operate is, is
37:46
the product that we're building
37:46
six weeks at a time the best
37:49
product that we can build our
37:49
customers happy. Our
37:53
interactions with our customers
37:53
good and positive? are we
37:57
helping to define and move the
37:57
podcasting space and the healthy
38:01
direction? Are we continuing to
38:01
support independent podcasters
38:05
and their success in their
38:05
passion projects in their
38:08
hobbies and their businesses.
38:08
That's what's important to us.
38:12
And I think as long as we do
38:12
that, then whatever other
38:15
opportunities appear in the
38:15
space, we're well positioned to
38:18
react to quickly. And maybe we
38:18
make some decisions that cause
38:22
others to react quickly. But
38:22
we're under no illusions that
38:26
we're the biggest in the space.
38:26
Regardless of how successful we
38:30
were. We're in a space that has
38:30
the biggest titans of industry
38:33
doing similar things to what
38:33
we're doing. I mean, there's
38:36
there we're playing with Apple,
38:36
we're playing with Spotify,
38:38
we're playing with Google, and
38:38
Amazon, like the biggest
38:41
companies in tech have some
38:41
interest in podcasting. And so I
38:46
want to stay humble, and I want
38:46
to stay hungry, and I want to
38:49
stay aggressive. But I want to
38:49
always remember who it is that
38:53
we're serving, and how can we
38:53
help them be successful. And I
38:56
think as long as we continue to
38:56
do that and make the best
38:58
decisions, we can six weeks at a
38:58
time. It doesn't matter if we
39:01
have 100,000 or 100 million
39:01
podcasts, I think I'm going to
39:05
be satisfied and fulfilled
39:05
regardless of where that number
39:07
is.
39:08  Tom
What had an impact on me
39:08
was when we got together and
39:12
said, Could we be the number one
39:12
paid hosts? Could we be can we
39:16
be the biggest host out there
39:16
that does what we do. And that
39:21
was it wasn't ever anything that
39:21
we were motivated by. But Kevin
39:26
kind of threw the gauntlet down
39:26
and said, hey, let's try it just
39:28
for fun. Like, let's just, let's
39:28
just go for it. And we hunkered
39:32
down and we focused and that's
39:32
what we did. And so I feel like
39:36
it was kind of crossing a finish
39:36
finish line to a certain extent
39:39
of can we do it? Yeah, we can.
39:39
That doesn't mean that that
39:43
needs to be our focus forever.
39:43
That doesn't mean that that's
39:45
the way that we need to operate
39:45
the company. Because we always
39:48
say things like, you know, the
39:48
numbers aren't what matters and
39:50
it's the people and the product
39:50
and the customers. That's what
39:53
really matters doesn't really
39:53
matter. You know, the numbers
39:56
outside of the fact that we need
39:56
to pay our bills. And this was
40:00
Testing well, but could we do
40:00
it? Could we could we make our
40:05
product that you know,
40:05
attractive. And anyways, so the
40:08
long story short, I feel like
40:08
for me, there was a great
40:11
accomplishment of crossing that
40:11
milestone. And that is not the
40:16
end all be all, it was just a
40:16
goal that we had, that was fun
40:19
for us to do. But I am humbled
40:19
and excited at the place that
40:25
we've reached, because what it
40:25
allows us to do is to focus on
40:28
our team to focus on building an
40:28
environment that is a great
40:33
place to work where the best
40:33
talent in the industry wants to
40:37
be a part of what you're doing.
40:37
And being the best product for a
40:42
specific demographic of people,
40:42
people that are looking for an
40:46
easy way for them to get their
40:46
message out there to the world.
40:49
I've always been excited about
40:49
that message. That's enough to
40:52
motivate me. And so it's, it's,
40:52
it's humbling to see the message
40:57
resonate, and to have people on
40:57
the team that are willing to
41:01
commit to being a part of of
41:01
what we're doing. I'm much more
41:04
excited about that than I am
41:04
about the number of podcasts
41:06
that are hosted on Buzzsprout.
41:06
Well, thank
41:09  Travis
you so much, Tom, and
41:09
Kevin for sitting down with me
41:10
and, and sharing the story of
41:10
Buzzsprout, where we came from
41:13
where we are, and I'm just
41:13
excited about the future. I
41:16
think the future is bright for
41:16
podcasting. And we're just
41:20
really excited to partner with
41:20
you listening to this episode,
41:23
to help you share a message that
41:23
you're passionate about with the
41:26
world and give you all the tools
41:26
that you need to do that
41:29
successfully. Now, if you're
41:29
listening to this episode, and
41:32
you really enjoyed it, you
41:32
really enjoyed a different
41:34
flair, different format than we
41:34
normally do. Then let us know
41:38
jump into the Buzzsprout podcast
41:38
community over in Facebook on
41:42
our Facebook group. And let us
41:42
know what you thought about this
41:44
episode. If you have other ideas
41:44
for special episodes we can
41:48
create in the future we'd love
41:48
to hear those ideas as well. And
41:51
and hopefully this gave you a
41:51
better understanding of how the
41:55
company that you use probably
41:55
for your podcast came to be and
41:59
why it's designed the way that
41:59
it is hopefully by hearing from
42:03
Kevin and Tom and their stories
42:03
and and the things that they
42:05
shared. You just got to know
42:05
Buzzsprout a little bit better.
42:09
Well thank you for tuning into
42:09
this very special episode of
42:11
Buzzcast. We hope you enjoyed
42:11
it. And we'll catch you in the
42:14
next one. Keep podcasting