The MindShift Podcast with Darrell Evans

Have you ever felt stuck on your entrepreneurial journey? Want to avoid the critical mistakes most entrepreneurs make in growing their business? Do you wish you could pick the brain of other successful entrepreneurs about how they succeed on their road from inspiration to realization and when life knocked them down, from breakdown to breakthrough? Welcome to The MindShift Podcast hosted by Darrell Evans, a serial entrepreneur, investor, and business growth strategist. That's what does each week with his expert guests. Darrell is the founder of the MindShift Business Academy and co-founder of Yokel Local, a successful digital marketing agency. To learn more follow Darrell @mrdarrellevans on Instagram or visit www.darrellevans.net

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60: Attorney Asha Wilkerson on Building a Business and Leaving a Legacy [transcript]


Today Asha Wilkerson and I dive into building a business and leaving a legacy. Asha is an attorney by training and teacher by heart. She shares how after almost 10 years of running her law practice, she decided to shift her focus and build a membership community focusing on the needs of BIPOC entrepreneurs.

Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full Episode:

  • Get insight into why Asha Wilkerson decided to shift her focus and build a membership community focus on the needs of BIPOC entrepreneurs.
  • The shift in the hustle mentality of today's entrepreneurs; why the traditional law practice didn't work, the role of mentorship in her life, and that of her students.
  • How the pandemic shifted her thinking as a business owner.

Resources

Join the Transcend Membership Community 
Connect with Asha Wilkerson: Instagram | LinkedIn

Books mentioned:
4-Hour Work Week
Hustle Harder, Hustle Smarter

Enjoying The MindShift Podcast?

Click here to subscribe to Apple Podcasts? While there, please leave a 5-star rating, and review. 

Also, if you haven't done so already, join the free MindShift Community to connect with other like-minded people. 

Don't forget to tag me @mrdarrellevans on Instagram and Facebook. 

Thanks for listening, 

Darrell

15 minute audio of 5 mistakes entrepreneurs must avoid + 5 part email series.


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 2021-06-08  50m
 
 
01:15  Asha Wilkerson
So for example,
01:15
in my own life, starting my own
01:18
law practice, it wasn't
01:18
necessarily something I thought
01:20
I wanted, I kind of started out
01:20
of necessity. I was working for
01:23
a law firm, and they had layoffs
01:23
and I was one of the last people
01:27
to get hired. So I was one of
01:27
the first people get let go in
01:29
the layoffs. And I was taking
01:29
contract work and applying for
01:33
other jobs. And one of my
01:33
friends said to me, she asked,
01:35
you're already doing the work.
01:35
Why don't you just open your
01:38
practice? I was like, Why don't
01:38
what didn't even cross my mind.
01:43
I had no desire to be an
01:43
entrepreneur to do my own thing,
01:47
right. And then I realized that
01:47
by going to law school, I had
01:50
become the asset right? I was
01:50
the skill I didn't need somebody
01:54
else to empower me to do the
01:54
work. So I started doing the
01:58
work and started and opened up
01:58
my own practice.
02:02  The MindShift Podcast
This is
02:02
the mind shift podcast where we
02:04
share real stories, real
02:04
strategies that will help you
02:07
find real success. This is the
02:07
place to hear from people just
02:11
like you who've taken their
02:11
ideas, goals and dreams from a
02:14
point of inspiration to
02:14
realization or when life knock
02:17
them down from a point of
02:17
breakdown to breakthrough. I'm
02:21
your host, Darrell Evans. Let's
02:21
get started with today's
02:24
episode.
02:27  Darrell Evans
Hey, what's going
02:27
on? It's Darrell. Welcome to
02:29
another episode of the mind
02:29
shift podcast. I've got a great
02:32
show for you today. My guest is
02:32
Asha Wilkerson. She's an
02:37
attorney by training teacher by
02:37
heart. After almost 10 years of
02:41
running her own law practice,
02:41
she decided to shift her focus
02:45
and build a membership community
02:45
focus on the needs of bipoc
02:49
entrepreneurs. She calls it the
02:49
place where entrepreneurs who
02:53
are ready to break the financial
02:53
ceiling, go to get educated,
02:57
become inspired, and create
02:57
generational wealth. During the
03:01
show, she talks about the book
03:01
that she probably read too early
03:06
in her career. The shift in the
03:06
hustle mentality of today's
03:10
entrepreneurs, why the
03:10
traditional law practice just
03:14
didn't work for her the role of
03:14
mentorship in her life and that
03:18
of her students. She also talks
03:18
about how the pandemic shifted
03:22
her thinking as a business
03:22
owner, and much, much more. Now,
03:26
before we jump in, let me ask
03:26
you something. Are you
03:28
subscribed to the mind shift
03:28
podcast, you can do that right
03:32
now by hitting the little
03:32
subscribe or follow button
03:35
wherever you're listening to the
03:35
show. If you enjoyed today's
03:38
show, consider leaving us a five
03:38
star rating and review. If
03:42
you're listening on Apple
03:42
podcasts, it does help us reach
03:45
more people. Lastly, if you want
03:45
more support on your journey,
03:49
after the show, join us inside
03:49
the free mind shift community.
03:54
It's the place where our
03:54
listeners continue the
03:56
conversation. get additional
03:56
support, mentorship and
04:00
networking on their journey from
04:00
inspiration to realization or
04:05
when life knocks them down from
04:05
breakdown to breakthrough. After
04:10
the show is over, head over to
04:10
mind shift community.com can
04:14
join for free. That's mind shift
04:14
community.com. But don't do that
04:20
now. Here's Asha.
04:22
Well, Asha, welcome to the
04:22
MindScape podcast. How you
04:24
doing?
04:25  Asha Wilkerson
Thank you. I am
04:25
great. How are you today?
04:28  Darrell Evans
I'm Wonderful.
04:28
Wonderful. Where are you joining
04:30
us from?
04:31  Asha Wilkerson
I am in the
04:31
wonderful city of Oakland,
04:33
California or the town as we
04:33
call it across the bay from San
04:36
Francisco.
04:37  Darrell Evans
Okay. All right.
04:37
All right. And you've your law
04:39
practices there, right? It is.
04:39
Yep, that's correct. Very good.
04:43
Well, I'm excited to talk to you
04:43
today about all things business
04:47
legal. It is an interesting
04:47
concept and topic. And I love
04:50
reading about your background.
04:50
And the focus that you have on
04:54
helping the younger newer
04:54
entrepreneur who's in business,
04:58
maybe still handling it as a
04:58
side hustle. But really drawing
05:01
the distinctions between side
05:01
hustle and really Stanford
05:06
building a business that'll
05:06
leave a legacy. So why don't we
05:08
start there. I know that that's
05:08
where we are today. And we'll go
05:11
back into the past in just a
05:11
moment. But talk to me a little
05:14
bit about why it's so important
05:14
to you about building the
05:16
business that leaves a legacy.
05:18  Asha Wilkerson
Yeah,
05:18
absolutely. Well, I think in our
05:20
communities, but black and brown
05:20
communities, immigrant
05:22
communities, we do things that
05:22
are side, hustle asked, we bring
05:26
in a little bit of extra cash
05:26
because we need it. But there's
05:28
so many folks who end up working
05:28
in their business until the day
05:31
that they die. They give
05:31
themselves to the business but
05:34
they don't understand how to
05:34
craft the business to give back
05:38
to the person. We're all
05:38
starting businesses because we
05:40
want a little bit more money,
05:40
one little bit more freedom,
05:43
some control over our destiny,
05:43
but we don't always know how to
05:46
make that happen. So that's the
05:46
idea. Do your thing. Do your
05:50
passion, you know, make your
05:50
mixtapes or whatever, right,
05:54
whatever it is that you want to
05:54
do. But do it in a way like make
05:57
your passion work for you. Not
05:57
just a labor of love, but
06:00
something that's going to
06:00
reciprocate so that you don't
06:03
have to work until you're 67 or
06:03
70 or 85. Right. You get to
06:07
enjoy life a little bit along
06:07
the way. But the benefit of
06:10
pursuing a passion but also
06:10
making it work for you.
06:13  Darrell Evans
Yeah, I love it.
06:13
I love it. I saw a video I don't
06:16
know if it was a video or
06:16
somewhere I saw in text and you
06:18
said you can't sell a sole
06:18
proprietorship?
06:20  Asha Wilkerson
You sure can
06:20
legally you can't, right?
06:22
Because by definition, a sole
06:22
proprietorship, it's an
06:25
extension of the person of the
06:25
individual. So you know, when
06:29
you have an LLC, or a
06:29
corporation that is legal to
06:31
sell, and also just getting
06:31
ourselves to think about maybe I
06:34
do want to sell it one day,
06:34
right? People in tech, the
06:38
objective of starting a tech
06:38
company is to have it bought out
06:41
by somebody, take all the money
06:41
and go do something else, maybe
06:44
retire, maybe not maybe start a
06:44
new project. But that is a way
06:47
to generate revenue and change
06:47
the future. But I don't know
06:50
that we normally think of that
06:50
as an option. I think we think
06:53
of things is what we need to do
06:53
for the rest of our lives.
06:56  Darrell Evans
Yeah, you know, a
06:56
good piece of advice I received
06:58
almost a decade ago, even though
06:58
I've been seasoned in my
07:01
journey, but I'd never heard it
07:01
this way. And that is a business
07:04
that is built to sell is good
07:04
for the owner, whether you sell
07:08
it or not. Mm hmm, absolutely.
07:08
Yeah. It goes to say, and a lot
07:12
of times, you're right, we build
07:12
these businesses, and we are the
07:14
sole person in the business. And
07:14
someone else I mentor from, they
07:18
say you're dancing there. And
07:18
it's an analogy that there's a
07:21
YouTube video of a dancing bear
07:21
somehow came up with the
07:24
analogy. But that is that when
07:24
you're not there, the business
07:26
doesn't run when you're not
07:26
there visitors and make money,
07:29
and then doesn't break a bit,
07:29
right?
07:31  Asha Wilkerson
Yeah, I agree.
07:31
It feels more restricted, right?
07:34
I don't think any of us start a
07:34
business thinking we want to be
07:37
working more, quote unquote,
07:37
nine to five, if that really
07:39
even exists anymore. But you do
07:39
work in your business all the
07:42
time. But again, you want to be
07:42
working in a way that gives you
07:46
more freedom, right? So my, for
07:46
me, my wheels are always turning
07:50
in terms of thinking about how
07:50
to innovate my business, reach
07:52
more people change things, new
07:52
offerings, but I'm not always
07:55
stuck to my desk. So I can be
07:55
thinking about my business and
07:58
Puerto Rico somewhere, right.
07:58
And that's like, that's freedom.
08:01
And I can have money coming in
08:01
while I'm in Croatia. And that,
08:04
to me is freedom. But it's just
08:04
training our minds to think
08:07
about that to another point that
08:07
you talked about about being the
08:10
sole person in the business is
08:10
that we need to switch our
08:14
mindset and start looking at our
08:14
businesses like we would some
08:17
other corporation or LLC that we
08:17
were going to get a job from it
08:21
is your labor of love, but
08:21
remove yourself from it. And how
08:24
would you evaluate this company?
08:24
How would you run this company?
08:28
What suggestions would you have
08:28
for the owner if you were an
08:30
employee, and then implement
08:30
those, you know, grow it, build
08:34
it in a way that is life giving.
08:34
And then the other part of that
08:38
too, is years ago, I probably
08:38
read it too early in my career,
08:41
I read the four hour workweek by
08:41
Tim Ferriss. And this was like
08:44
when I was just starting out.
08:44
And I was like, ooh, four hours.
08:47
That's great. And I probably
08:47
shouldn't have read it. So soon
08:50
in the business. I didn't have
08:50
this foundation text. Exactly.
08:54
But one of the principles that
08:54
he talks about is that you are
08:57
the sticking point in your
08:57
business. So if you can bring
09:00
people around you and empower
09:00
them, you get out of your own
09:04
way, right? I don't see any more
09:04
value in me sitting at my desk
09:08
doing the work from 8am to 6pm,
09:08
then in hiring other people to
09:13
help me do the work. So we can
09:13
all work shorter days, I don't
09:16
think that there's any more self
09:16
worth, if I'm the one who's
09:19
doing all the work versus hiring
09:19
somebody else. I think it makes
09:22
me a smarter business owner, it
09:22
gives me more time helps me to
09:25
empower other people, right, we
09:25
get to grow more. So there's I
09:28
don't have to hold on to being
09:28
the one. And if you know if I'm
09:32
not there, my business crumbles.
09:32
It's not a way to run a
09:34
business. That's not a way to
09:34
run your life. Right. But it's
09:36
that mindset shift and just
09:36
thinking about what are the
09:38
opportunities and the
09:38
possibilities?
09:40  Darrell Evans
Yeah, great
09:40
point, you talk to hundreds if
09:43
not 1000s of businesses, I do
09:43
the same in my work. Let's spend
09:46
some time there for a second.
09:46
Why do you think that is,
09:49
especially in bipoc communities
09:49
that we seem to be celebrating?
09:54
This is my words, love to hear
09:54
your intake? Why is it that we
09:58
seem to celebrate the idea that
09:58
we're an entrepreneur, or the
10:03
realization of the fact that
10:03
Okay, now I do have my business,
10:06
and maybe I did leave the
10:06
corporate job. But yet when I
10:08
get into the world, I'm still
10:08
working 60 hours a week, 80
10:11
hours a week? And I actually say
10:11
yeah, but I work for myself. In
10:15
my opinion, it's not enough to
10:15
just say you work for yourself,
10:18
and it goes back, right? You're
10:18
saying, Why do you think in your
10:21
experience? We seem to stop at
10:21
the hustle mentality? The
10:26
hustle? Yeah.
10:28  Asha Wilkerson
Yeah. So I think
10:28
there's two parts to that
10:29
question. Why do we celebrate
10:29
entrepreneurship so much? I
10:32
think it's psychological. I
10:32
think it comes from our history
10:35
in the United States of being
10:35
over determined and told where
10:39
we can go when we have to go,
10:39
you know, having a boss, there's
10:43
something about like, black
10:43
folks that want freedom. And it
10:46
makes sense, right, given the
10:46
history of how black people
10:49
arrived in this country. So I
10:49
think being able to say that you
10:52
don't have someone to answer to
10:52
which you do, right. It's just a
10:56
different you don't identify it
10:56
in the same way you have all
10:58
your customers to answer to and
10:58
your family to answer to. But I
11:02
think that's the I think that's
11:02
the big catalyst behind people
11:05
wanting to leave corporate
11:05
America. I think it is also
11:07
uncomfortable, both selves
11:07
aren't celebrated. So we have to
11:11
fit into a particular kind of
11:11
mold, right with a particular
11:14
kind of attitude. That's not too
11:14
scary and is helpful and you
11:18
know, totally of service. So
11:18
there's a lot of freedom and
11:21
entrepreneurship because you get
11:21
to decide how you want to do it.
11:25
On the flip side, though, I
11:25
think we don't have enough
11:29
mentors or enough people who
11:29
have come before us to show us
11:32
how to run the business, right
11:32
how to make it successful in a
11:38
way that doesn't depend on just
11:38
hustle. But now there's a shift
11:41
in entrepreneurship, talking
11:41
about resting and recuperating
11:44
and taking time off and self
11:44
care. But when I first started,
11:47
it was like, if you're not
11:47
working seven days a week, you
11:50
know, if you're not up at 10pm,
11:50
and you know, in 3am, like what
11:53
are you really doing, right?
11:53
That was the narrative. And even
11:56
for me, it started to sink in,
11:56
like, Oh, I'm just I have a hard
11:59
time resting because I'm, you
11:59
know, I got those messages early
12:02
on, but felt like I was being
12:02
lazy. If I was doing something.
12:06
That's so true, there is still
12:06
some hustle to it, it just looks
12:10
different. You do have to be the
12:10
one to go and get the business.
12:14
You do have to put in the work,
12:14
there is still that hard work
12:18
component to entrepreneurship,
12:18
but it's hustle smart. Don't
12:22
just hustle for the sake of
12:22
being busy and saying you're
12:25
doing all of these things,
12:25
hustle smart, so that your
12:28
hustle become systematize. And
12:28
you don't have to keep you know,
12:32
quote unquote hustling anymore.
12:34  Darrell Evans
Without question,
12:34
the hustle is required at the
12:35
beginning. And I think like you
12:35
just finished off with hustling
12:38
smart. And I think what the work
12:38
you're doing is you're working
12:41
on helping people hustle
12:41
smarter, which is funny, because
12:44
now we're talking about 50 cents
12:44
book, I actually recommend if
12:47
you haven't read it, and for
12:47
those listening, if you haven't
12:49
read, I think it's hustle
12:49
harder, hustle smarter, I may
12:52
have the title flip flop one
12:52
way, I was really impressed by
12:56
just learning the journey, you
12:56
know, from 50 cent to Curtis
13:00
Jackson. And there were some
13:00
very interesting insights, none
13:04
that probably you would notice
13:04
or recognize on the outside. But
13:06
there were some very interesting
13:06
distinctions about his hustle
13:10
smarter to accommodate you just
13:10
made that I think are fitting
13:13
and I think it lines up with the
13:13
work that you're doing in the
13:16
small business world, especially
13:16
in bipoc community. So let's
13:19
jump back to what got you
13:19
passionate about law and go into
13:23
law school. And by the way, I
13:23
get issue with the fact that I
13:25
saw somewhere that you said,
13:25
Yeah, I got my, my JD, I've done
13:29
that bet. 10 years, and I got an
13:29
MBA somewhere along the line.
13:33
But I was like, how dare she,
13:33
you know, how are you gonna kick
13:37
off business school like that?
13:37
I'm just messing with you.
13:43  Asha Wilkerson
That's funny. I
13:43
was not that kid who always
13:45
wanted to be an attorney. And I
13:45
didn't realize that I knew any
13:48
attorneys growing up. I did have
13:48
a couple friends whose parents
13:51
were attorneys that I didn't
13:51
realize until I think after I
13:53
got to law school. My mom was
13:53
like, Oh, yeah, so and so's dad
13:56
was an attorney was like,
13:56
really, I had no idea. But I did
13:59
love one order. But I wanted to
13:59
be the forensic psychologist,
14:02
Dr. Wong, online order. I didn't
14:02
I didn't want to be the police
14:05
officers. I enjoyed figuring out
14:05
why people did the things that
14:08
they did the psychological part
14:08
of it. But I didn't want to be
14:11
in the courtroom. I didn't, you
14:11
know, that wasn't for me. But I
14:15
ended up I was at Santa Clara
14:15
University and the Dean of
14:18
Admissions for the law school
14:18
came to our Black Student Union
14:20
and said, Hey, students, we've
14:20
got this opportunity this summer
14:24
for undergraduate students who
14:24
are possibly interested in law
14:26
will pay you for four weeks to
14:26
come and take real law school
14:30
classes with professors, you
14:30
know, meet with judges go to
14:33
nonprofits, that kind of a
14:33
thing. And I was supposed to go
14:36
work at the Boys and Girls Club
14:36
back in Portland, Oregon, where
14:38
I was born and raised and the
14:38
funding got cut. So my job got
14:41
cut. So I applied was like,
14:41
Well, what else am I gonna do?
14:44
Let me just apply and see if I
14:44
get in. And I did. And that's my
14:47
philosophy. Just try and see
14:47
what happens if the door opens.
14:50
Okay. Think about walking
14:50
through it. If it doesn't, then
14:52
that's, you know, go the other
14:52
way. Right. So I applied it was
14:56
admitted, I ended up liking the
14:56
summer program, a lot came back,
15:00
and I did it a year early. So
15:00
they were targeting juniors into
15:03
rising seniors. And I did it as
15:03
a sophomore going into my junior
15:07
year, came back the next year as
15:07
a counselor, and a year after
15:10
that as a counselor, but they
15:10
taught us how to take the L sat
15:13
gave us test prep. And I just
15:13
thought, Well, let me just try.
15:16
I really wanted to be a high
15:16
school English teacher at that
15:19
point. My mom was a principal
15:19
for most of her career, so I
15:22
thought I was gonna follow her
15:22
in her footsteps in education.
15:25
And then I ended up getting into
15:25
law school, I did the work. It's
15:28
not like it really just happened
15:28
by happenstance. But I wasn't
15:31
sure. And then when I made the
15:31
choice to I go into teaching, or
15:35
do I go into law school, I
15:35
thought that law would give me
15:37
the greatest foundation to be
15:37
able to help people in different
15:40
ways. So I could show up in
15:40
court, I could write policy, I
15:43
could, you know, help people
15:43
form businesses. I was really
15:46
into traveling and wanting to do
15:46
human rights. So I just thought
15:50
that law would be the biggest
15:50
kind of gateway to doing
15:53
whatever it was that I wanted in
15:53
this service, sort of oriented
15:58
space that I'm in. That's how I
15:58
ended up in law school.
16:01  Darrell Evans
Great story. I
16:01
love the idea of just try, you
16:03
know, you don't know until you
16:03
try and you know, if you've got
16:05
an interest in it, take the
16:05
path. There's nothing wrong with
16:08
getting the information. That's
16:08
something that I think a lot of
16:10
times we just, we talk to
16:10
ourselves and we talk ourselves
16:13
out of it before we ever get a
16:13
chance to see if it seems For
16:16
us, but I just loved what you
16:16
said, I just tried it like
16:18
nothing is going to happen if
16:18
you just decide to go a
16:21
different direction. So right.
16:21
And I think when you're young
16:23
coming up, even it doesn't
16:23
matter what age you are, if
16:26
there's something of interest,
16:26
go take a look, I've changed
16:29
careers three times, officially,
16:29
in my 30 years of work three
16:32
times three whole careers. I
16:32
mean, you know, yeah, most
16:35
people stay in the same place
16:35
for 30, or 40. I've changed
16:38
three or four times and had all
16:38
sorts of side businesses, or
16:41
side interests. So just follow
16:41
your heart's desire. So tell me
16:44
about how has your work as an
16:44
attorney in the world of
16:47
business law? What are you
16:47
seeing as the biggest mistakes
16:51
that entrepreneurs are making
16:51
that could not just cost them
16:55
their, you know, dollars, like,
16:55
we can make more dollars, but
16:58
really destroy the very essence
16:58
of what they're chasing? Like,
17:03
talk to us about so and I know
17:03
some of these may sound basic,
17:06
but talk to us about some of
17:06
these big mistakes that are just
17:09
working businesses almost out of
17:09
their business.
17:12  Asha Wilkerson
Yeah, I think
17:12
one is not having enough
17:14
information. On one hand, you
17:14
could gather all of this
17:17
information and never start. But
17:17
then on the other hand, you can
17:20
go full steam ahead without
17:20
having, you know, proper
17:23
background. And that doesn't
17:23
mean that you necessarily need
17:26
it. But you got to put the
17:26
people in place around you who
17:29
can mentor you give you the
17:29
information. So building a team
17:32
of attorneys, accountants, you
17:32
know, business coaches, that
17:35
kind of a thing, when that's too
17:35
expensive to do in the
17:38
beginning, join some groups are
17:38
all kinds of groups on Facebook,
17:41
a lot of people have free
17:41
groups, you can get information,
17:43
join those, because you want to
17:43
be in community with people who
17:48
are doing it, have done it and
17:48
also want to see you do it,
17:51
whatever that is, right. And
17:51
that goes for whether you're
17:53
trying to go to college or get
17:53
into grad school or travel,
17:57
right, there's all kinds of
17:57
interest groups. So find that. I
17:59
think another thing too, is that
17:59
once people start, a lot of
18:04
times, you get caught up in what
18:04
you think it is supposed to be.
18:08
And it's really easy to go from.
18:08
This was my dream. But people
18:12
have said it should be like
18:12
this. And now you're over here,
18:15
you know, and six lanes away
18:15
from what you really wanted. So
18:19
your business isn't really in
18:19
alignment with what you want. So
18:22
for example, in my own life,
18:22
starting my own law practice, it
18:25
wasn't necessarily something I
18:25
thought I wanted, I kind of
18:27
started it out of necessity. I
18:27
was working for a law firm, and
18:31
they had layoffs. And I was one
18:31
of the last people to get hired.
18:34
So I was one of the first people
18:34
to let go and get let go in the
18:36
layoffs. And I was taking
18:36
contract work and applying for
18:40
other jobs. And one of my
18:40
friends said to me, she asked,
18:42
you're already doing the work,
18:42
why don't you just open your
18:45
practice, I was like, Why don't
18:45
what didn't even cross my mind,
18:50
I had no desire to be an
18:50
entrepreneur or to do my own
18:54
thing, right. And then I
18:54
realized that by going to law
18:57
school, I had become the asset,
18:57
right, I was the skill, I didn't
19:00
need somebody else to empower me
19:00
to do the work. So I started
19:05
doing the work and started and
19:05
opened up my own practice. And
19:08
then after a few years, I got
19:08
burnt out, but it took me I
19:11
don't know exactly how many
19:11
years it took me. But it took me
19:13
a while to get enough courage or
19:13
audacity, maybe to say, this
19:18
traditional practice of law
19:18
doesn't work for me, and I'm
19:21
gonna find something else to do.
19:21
So I ended up teaching in
19:25
community college, and I'm still
19:25
teaching in community college
19:27
full time. But that was the
19:27
buffer that gave me the space to
19:30
step back from the law practice
19:30
for a couple years, and decide
19:33
really how I wanted it to be.
19:33
And I had already said, a couple
19:36
years before that, I love
19:36
teaching, I'm good at teaching,
19:40
I want to empower people, you
19:40
know, I don't want it to be one
19:44
on one, I want it to be one to
19:44
many, right that kind of a
19:46
thing. But I was too afraid or
19:46
maybe just didn't have the
19:50
roadmap to step out on my own
19:50
because every other law practice
19:55
was that traditional bill by the
19:55
hour kind of a thing, right?
19:58
Like this kind of thing didn't
19:58
exist. And so when I finally
20:01
said, This is what I'm good at,
20:01
and this is how I can make my
20:05
degree or my job in line with
20:05
me, instead of trying to fit
20:10
myself in line with this other
20:10
thing. then things started to
20:14
take off right now. I love
20:14
showing up for my membership
20:17
community because it's teaching,
20:17
because it's meeting with people
20:20
at seeing people face to face.
20:20
That's way better to me than
20:23
working on a contract behind the
20:23
scenes where I'm like, I know
20:26
the person but like, gosh, I
20:26
have to read another shout out,
20:29
you know, for us. That's just
20:29
not my jam. Other people really
20:35
like it. That's not for me. So
20:35
in order for me to be excited
20:39
about putting myself out there,
20:39
I have to make sure that it's in
20:42
alignment. And it's really easy
20:42
to get off track. Because you're
20:45
insecure, right? You don't know
20:45
you're trying a new thing.
20:48
You're looking for affirmation
20:48
confirmation, but you have to
20:51
really be sure about what you
20:51
want and also be willing to
20:54
pivot when it doesn't fit. You
20:54
know, when it doesn't feel good.
20:57
It doesn't feel right. Wow,
20:59  Darrell Evans
I mean, there's
20:59
so much there that I could want
21:00
to unpack but I'm gonna pick one
21:00
thing that you said that I want
21:03
to make sure the audience heard
21:03
clearly. I am the asset. I have
21:09
acquired the skill and there's
21:09
something very special in that
21:13
that is it's great to hear you
21:13
say Because I think so often in
21:18
bipoc communities, we don't
21:18
catch that sort of positive
21:22
reinforcement of our own self
21:22
awareness. Right. Right.
21:26
Sometimes we have to speak
21:26
highly of ourselves instead of
21:29
always waiting for other people
21:29
to speak highly of us. Right?
21:32
And I love the way you said
21:32
that. And I'm interested. And
21:36
your focus is just seems like
21:36
everything I've saw in your
21:40
background and your backstory.
21:40
Where do you think this this
21:43
focus comes from? Because you
21:43
seem very focus, you seem very
21:47
strong minded, strong willed.
21:47
You don't become a lawyer
21:50
easily. Let's be clear about
21:50
that. I've never done it myself.
21:53
They just don't hand them
21:53
suckers out. Maybe that'll be
21:57
your fourth career. Yeah, truth
21:57
be told, when the market crashed
22:01
in Oh, eight, my company got
22:01
sued. And we were taken on
22:05
water. I owned a mortgage
22:05
company at the time. And credit
22:08
banks were taken our credit
22:08
lines left and right, left and
22:11
right. And of course, everybody
22:11
wanted to sue every lender
22:13
possible if they didn't do what
22:13
they were supposed to do with
22:15
their own mortgage. So we had
22:15
this one big lawsuit that we
22:18
were, first of all, we know it
22:18
was frivolous, number one.
22:20
Number two, we just did the
22:20
research ourselves. And me and
22:23
my partner, I did some he did
22:23
some. And of course, we were
22:25
dropped from that they really
22:25
wanted to go after countrywide.
22:28
And they just named everybody at
22:28
the process. And it was
22:30
interesting, because in the
22:30
moment of pivot at that time for
22:33
me, although I knew what I
22:33
wanted to do next, I did
22:36
question going back to law
22:36
school, a friend of mine named
22:38
Brian told me this many, many
22:38
years ago, he went to college
22:41
got his law degree. And what he
22:41
said was, Darrell, with my law
22:44
degree, I can do anything I
22:44
want. Yep. And so from that
22:47
Brian's words, always sat back
22:47
in my mind. And when I did think
22:51
about going back to school,
22:51
there was one small chance where
22:53
I said, Go get the MBA, or go to
22:53
law school. So in Oh, eight, I
22:57
did give it that thought. But I
22:57
didn't decide to do that.
22:59
Because I guess I came a long
22:59
way without it. So I was like,
23:01
I'll be alright. Yeah. But let's
23:01
go back to the focus question. I
23:04
love your mindset. I love your,
23:04
your attention to passionate
23:08
your focus. And I know that it
23:08
just didn't come. Were you out
23:10
of the womb passionate is that,
23:14  Asha Wilkerson
you know, I
23:14
probably was right, I probably
23:17
was. I grew up as an only child.
23:17
So I didn't have siblings around
23:20
me. And I loved children. I
23:20
think I got that from my mom.
23:23
And from my auntie, they're both
23:23
career educators. And so as soon
23:26
as I was old enough, I remember
23:26
taking this babysitting class at
23:29
the local community. So the Rec
23:29
Center, so that I could babysit
23:32
this kid down the street who I
23:32
was only five years older than
23:35
him, I think, you know, 12, or
23:35
11. And he was six, and I was
23:39
able to finally babysit him. And
23:39
I think in that process, I just
23:43
have that caretaking, nurturing,
23:43
teaching kind of a spirit within
23:48
me. I've always worked with
23:48
children worked at a daycare and
23:52
college, you know, always
23:52
babysat. And then once I got to
23:56
law school, and right after I
23:56
started teaching exercise quite
23:58
like the teaching is just in me,
23:58
and I think it is our man. Yeah,
24:03
it's the empowerment of other
24:03
people. That is really in me. So
24:07
yes, being passionate from that
24:07
standpoint, sure, not being
24:10
passionate about the law,
24:10
because I didn't know anything
24:12
about that until later. But I
24:12
knew that I really enjoyed
24:16
helping people and that teacher
24:16
moment of when the light bulb
24:19
goes on for somebody else. Like
24:19
that's like, Oh, that's right,
24:24
that is absolutely the best or
24:24
the adage, or the proverb, you
24:27
know, give a man to fish and
24:27
he'll eat for a day teach a man
24:30
to fish and eat for a lifetime,
24:30
right? That's what I want to do.
24:33
I want to teach people and
24:33
empower people to do better for
24:36
themselves. Like I don't need
24:36
the power and the control, like
24:39
that's the white supremacist,
24:39
patriarchal paradigm that we
24:44
have been born into, right. But
24:44
like, there's enough for all of
24:47
us, I'm not in competition with
24:47
anybody, none of us are in
24:50
competition, there's enough for
24:50
all of us to eat and to eat
24:52
well. So it's truly my passion.
24:56  Darrell Evans
I love what you
24:56
just said that this is an
24:59
abundant place. And though the
24:59
world on the outside, looking
25:03
into TV channels, media, in
25:03
different places of the world
25:06
will try to get you to believe
25:06
that we have scarce resources.
25:10
No, that is not true. Not true.
25:10
There are regions that could use
25:14
resources. But the world this is
25:14
an abundant place. So I love
25:17
what you just said about that.
25:17
And it's interesting that I
25:20
think that we're in a season
25:20
right now where we're seeing a
25:22
rise, especially with social
25:22
media, podcast mediums like
25:26
this, YouTube, I've watched your
25:26
YouTube channel, you share
25:29
abundantly on YouTube, on
25:29
Instagram, and obviously through
25:32
your paid community and
25:32
transcend. And I think that
25:35
that's where we are in the world
25:35
today. And it's not just about
25:38
bipoc It's literally about the
25:38
world. It's right help people
25:42
get to the next level. And I you
25:42
know, one of my earliest
25:45
mentors, and of course, I grew
25:45
up in church, I could use all
25:47
the biblical references, but you
25:47
know, never forget Zig Ziglar
25:50
said it help enough other people
25:50
get what they want, and you'll
25:53
ultimately get everything you
25:53
want. And it's just true. It
25:58
just is ways
25:59  Asha Wilkerson
it is. So to add
25:59
to that if I can just add one
26:02
more thing, you know, a lot of
26:02
I've been seeing more sort of
26:05
business coaches saying more
26:05
recently, you know, what is your
26:08
service, you know, don't think
26:08
about selling to somebody think
26:11
about the service that you're
26:11
providing, you know that your
26:14
messaging comes through. When
26:14
you were talking about being of
26:17
service, it becomes easier to do
26:17
your job. When you think about
26:20
what is the service. So whether
26:20
it's you have a coffee shop, you
26:24
your service is providing really
26:24
good coffee, or maybe it's
26:27
providing a warm atmosphere that
26:27
feels like home to drink coffee
26:30
in, right? If it's earrings,
26:30
your services, providing an
26:33
accessory that helps the modern
26:33
woman or you know, modern
26:37
person, wear geometric shapes,
26:37
whatever it is. But if you come
26:41
from a place of service in your
26:41
business, even if you have
26:44
revenue goals, and you should,
26:44
starting from a place of service
26:47
will never steer you wrong,
26:47
because you'll always know who
26:49
your community is, and who your
26:49
target audience is such a great
26:52
point.
26:53  Darrell Evans
So you've been an
26:53
entrepreneur now for about 10
26:55
years, right? Somewhere in that
26:55
neighborhood. So tell me about
26:58
the most challenging thing for
26:58
you that you've had to deal with
27:01
and had to maybe shift your mind
27:01
about as an entrepreneur.
27:05  Asha Wilkerson
Oh, gosh, okay.
27:05
So first of all, challenges come
27:07
all over the place as an
27:07
entrepreneur, we see the wins on
27:10
social media, right, but we
27:10
don't talk about you know, the
27:13
low points, and you can have a
27:13
huge win and not so you know,
27:16
and a low point in the exact
27:16
same day, maybe the same hour.
27:20
So if you're feeling the ups and
27:20
downs, as an entrepreneur know
27:23
that that is perfectly normal,
27:23
there's nothing wrong with you,
27:25
you're not doing it wrong,
27:25
right? It's just that's just
27:28
what the journey is. It's like
27:28
life condense. It's like, you
27:31
know, life in HD is the journey
27:31
of an entrepreneur, right. So I
27:35
think one of the things that I
27:35
have learned is that it's okay
27:38
to pivot. When I first started
27:38
out, I thought that I had to be
27:42
this particular kind of a law
27:42
firm that build by the hour. And
27:45
then I didn't like that. And it
27:45
took me a while to realize it
27:48
was okay to switch to something
27:48
else. So then have clients on
27:51
retainer. And then I didn't
27:51
really like that, and it took me
27:54
a while or I liked it in the
27:54
moment, right. But things have a
27:57
season, it doesn't have to be
27:57
the same way all of the time.
28:00
You can change, you can grow,
28:00
you can pivot. And then I
28:02
thought, well, I really like
28:02
teaching. So let me you know,
28:05
explore this. And so one of the
28:05
challenges is continuing to
28:09
innovate and to change and to
28:09
offer something different, or
28:13
tweak it so that it fits what
28:13
you want to do, and fit
28:17
something that you were good at
28:17
doing. Right? There are models
28:20
that are out there, but
28:20
everybody is unique. And your
28:22
company can be just as unique as
28:22
you are. So don't be afraid to
28:28
pivot and to make the change.
28:28
It's not a sign of failure. It's
28:31
really a sign of growth, that
28:31
you have it and maybe you did it
28:34
only for a week, maybe you did
28:34
it for two years. But that
28:37
robbed that discomfort, don't
28:37
try and ignore it and feel like
28:40
you're failing, if you're not
28:40
comfortable anymore with what
28:43
had been working for the past
28:43
two years. That's a sign of
28:46
growth, and now you're moving on
28:46
to something else. And that's
28:49
okay. getting to that point, I
28:49
had to learn those lessons. I
28:52
don't want to just say it was a
28:52
struggle, I went through the
28:54
struggles, but the struggles
28:54
taught me that it's okay to
28:57
pivot. That's not a failure.
28:57
That's just a sign of growth.
28:59
And that's that mindset shift,
28:59
right? Yeah,
29:02  Darrell Evans
dropping gems,
29:02
dropping gems, you know, you
29:05
keep coming back to this idea of
29:05
pivot. And, you know, it's very
29:07
important to understand that
29:07
pivoting, simply, and I loved
29:10
how you tied the pivot, or the
29:10
shift into how you feel, you
29:15
know, frameworks are frameworks
29:15
for a reason is because they
29:19
work. But it doesn't mean that
29:19
you have to do it exactly the
29:22
way that framework was built,
29:22
you really have to be in tune
29:24
with who you are. And like you
29:24
said, You felt that you were a
29:27
teacher, and you had this
29:27
enabling, and you want to see
29:29
people when and it isn't just
29:29
about doing the work of the
29:32
service as a lawyer, that you
29:32
were able to align that and find
29:36
a synergy, right. And I say that
29:36
it's really important not to
29:39
evaluate, I always tell people
29:39
that everyone's has some sort of
29:43
what I call it DNA, definite
29:43
natural ability. And you learn
29:47
that through experience. Yeah,
29:47
you learn through experience.
29:50
And so the key as an
29:50
entrepreneur is to figure out
29:52
what your DNA is, and then
29:52
understand, okay, why do you
29:55
keep doing things that are not
29:55
in your natural ability, when
29:58
there are other people who are
29:58
built that way? They're wired
30:01
that way they care about a way
30:01
more than you ever will? Right?
30:04
Yeah. Yeah. And that's part of
30:04
building a team and building a
30:06
business that works for you. The
30:06
other thing you said, that was
30:09
interesting, very important to
30:09
understand is that you're when
30:12
you're making these pivots,
30:12
you're making the business serve
30:15
you in a way that it keeps you
30:15
healthy, right? in so many
30:18
words, you said that it fits me
30:18
better. To do it this way. I
30:23
started with this way, I then I
30:23
went to this way, the retainer
30:26
model, then I thought through
30:26
it, you know, but in the moment
30:28
it was good for you. So very,
30:28
very key distinctions in that.
30:32
Who have you gotten advice from
30:32
along the way in your
30:36
entrepreneurial journey, because
30:36
as much as I believe, coaches
30:40
and leaders who mentor and teach
30:40
and inspire others, I have found
30:44
a connection, that they are
30:44
usually getting poured into by
30:48
their mentors in some way,
30:48
shape, or form. And it could be
30:51
various types of things. share a
30:51
little bit about how you get
30:53
mentorship and who speaks into
30:53
you.
30:55  Asha Wilkerson
Yeah, that's
30:55
really interesting. I can't
30:58
think of like who would be the
30:58
primary mentor that I have. But
31:02
I am a part of Rachael Rogers
31:02
membership community and her
31:05
whole mission is to get empower
31:05
women entrepreneurs to create
31:09
million dollar businesses and to
31:09
scale their businesses to a
31:11
million dollars and joining that
31:11
community did for me, it was
31:15
really overwhelming at first,
31:15
because there are people who
31:18
were further along in the
31:18
journey, like, I had a $750,000
31:21
gear and oh, bah, bah, bah, you
31:21
know, and I was like, Oh my god,
31:25
what I felt so like, out of that
31:25
range, right, but it gives you
31:29
something to aspire to. And then
31:29
the community is large enough
31:32
that you have people who are
31:32
just starting out, like started
31:34
yesterday, and people who have
31:34
been in it for 10 years, and
31:37
everybody in between. And so you
31:37
can identify with somebody along
31:41
that journey. So I think, being
31:41
in a group of people who are
31:45
going the same direction, I
31:45
think it's almost easier to talk
31:48
about who not to listen to. But
31:48
actually, before I do that, let
31:52
me say, I tell people to take
31:52
advice from people who have
31:54
something to lose, right. So if
31:54
you're getting legal advice,
31:57
you're getting tax advice, get
31:57
that information from a licensed
32:01
professional, they are just as
32:01
equally invested in giving you
32:04
correct information as you are
32:04
as receiving it because if they
32:07
don't, then you can come after
32:07
their license, right. And it's
32:11
not that I'm telling people to
32:11
make a threat against somebody,
32:14
but just know who really has
32:14
skin in your game, in addition
32:18
to you so licensed attorneys in
32:18
your state who know your area,
32:23
and then also licensed tax
32:23
professionals. And I think the
32:26
other thing that I learned
32:26
quickly was that I couldn't
32:29
listen to everybody, right? So
32:29
even people who were in my legal
32:34
industry, I am doing stuff,
32:34
that's not the norm in law. And
32:38
in law, we are taught to look at
32:38
the worst case scenario, which
32:41
really sucks as an entrepreneur
32:41
because you have to dream big
32:45
and think that anything is
32:45
possible, right? But for my
32:47
three years in law school, my
32:47
you know, 11 year legal career,
32:50
I've been taught to look at what
32:50
is the worst possible scenario
32:54
and to plan for that. So I
32:54
couldn't go to other attorneys
32:58
in my industry and share my
32:58
ideas about how I wanted to
33:01
pivot because all of us ever
33:01
thought about was what could go
33:04
wrong. Nobody has done it like
33:04
this. It's not supposed to be
33:08
done. Right. It's interesting.
33:08
Very interesting. Yeah. And so I
33:12
had to say, Okay, thanks for the
33:12
conversation. But I'm not going
33:17
to get my inspiration from you,
33:17
I might learn how to protect
33:20
myself from you. But I'm not
33:20
going to get inspiration or
33:23
affirmation on this new journey
33:23
to building transcend from you.
33:27
I also love my mom dearly. Her
33:27
best interest is seeing me
33:31
protected, right? And our brains
33:31
do this to us when something is
33:35
new and uncertain. Our brains
33:35
say you can't do it, don't do
33:38
it. Because our brains want to
33:38
keep us safe. What is safe is
33:42
what we know right now, not
33:42
what's out there. So when I was
33:44
starting, and I was going
33:44
through my ups and downs, as an
33:46
entrepreneur, who did I call, I
33:46
called my mom because she's my
33:49
mom, right? And she'd be like,
33:49
Oh, are you sure you don't want
33:52
to go get a job. And you know,
33:52
she would do her best to really
33:54
try and encourage her. Like, she
33:54
wanted me to be safe and to be
33:58
financially secure. And she had
33:58
a four year career as an
34:01
educator. And that's what she
34:01
knew to be security. He wasn't
34:04
close enough to anybody on the
34:04
entrepreneurial journey that she
34:06
thought had been successful. So
34:06
she couldn't empower me in those
34:10
times when it was tough. She
34:10
always loved me, but she
34:13
couldn't give me that. So I had
34:13
to learn that I got to go
34:16
someplace else, you know,
34:16
someone who's also walking in
34:19
those shoes. And then I think
34:19
also, another really good friend
34:22
of mine always has this way of
34:22
putting things in perspective.
34:24
She's not an entrepreneur like I
34:24
am. But I can tell her
34:27
something, she knows who I
34:27
think. And she just adds that
34:30
other perspective. That's like,
34:30
I didn't think about it like
34:33
that, right. And it's not
34:33
necessarily about the business
34:35
advice. It's like the personal
34:35
encouragement when I need, you
34:38
know, some support some uplift
34:38
as a person because even though
34:41
I'm running a company, it's
34:41
still me, Asha, you know, the
34:44
person with all of my
34:44
insecurities, and flaws and
34:47
challenges and visions, and
34:47
hopes and dreams. And so I have
34:50
to also remember to empower that
34:50
person as I am growing the
34:54
company as well, because it's
34:54
still an extension of me.
34:56  Darrell Evans
Absolutely,
34:56
absolutely. Great points. And as
34:59
you're now working in your
34:59
membership community, you are
35:01
taking legal work, traditional
35:01
legal work, but you're kind of
35:05
moving more towards the coaching
35:05
and the membership community and
35:08
transcend. I've got a question
35:08
as it relates to especially the
35:11
current environment we're in
35:11
right now. How has the pandemic
35:14
and social distancing affected
35:14
your thinking as an
35:18
entrepreneur?
35:20  Asha Wilkerson
That's a really
35:20
good question. You know, it
35:22
didn't affect my business, per
35:22
se, because these ideas were
35:25
already in the works beforehand.
35:25
But it does really make you
35:29
think about how can you be not
35:29
evergreen is not the right word.
35:33
Right. But how can how can you
35:33
survive anything? what has been
35:38
happening traditionally, how
35:38
have we traditionally done
35:41
things? And now that we've had
35:41
this pandemic to shake up
35:43
things, and people have started
35:43
businesses, a lot of people's
35:45
businesses grew? What does that
35:45
tell us about what we thought?
35:49
Right? So we thought that we had
35:49
to have a brick and mortar
35:52
business, but we couldn't go to
35:52
the store for a whole year, you
35:56
know, six months, maybe right?
35:56
So what does that actually tell
35:59
you about your business and how
35:59
it needs to be run? Is what you
36:02
previously thought true? Or is
36:02
there another truth that you can
36:05
latch on to now and take and
36:05
grown? I think the other thing
36:09
too, is just it's really
36:09
exciting to see people starting
36:12
businesses there. In the
36:12
beginning, it seems like there
36:14
was an uptake of
36:14
Entrepreneurship at least
36:17
anecdotally, right, and the
36:17
folks that I'm connected to, on
36:20
social media, and I think it's
36:20
because people had more time to
36:23
think, sit and think about what
36:23
they want to do. And now people
36:26
are taking more time to do the
36:26
research, because we just have
36:29
more time in our schedule. So
36:29
you know, continue to surround
36:33
yourself with those folks that
36:33
you need to surround yourself to
36:37
be successful. Follow your
36:37
dreams, don't wait until well,
36:40
when I retire, you know, or in
36:40
10 years from now, you know, do
36:43
it now figure out a way to do
36:43
it. Because at the end, I don't
36:47
think you're going to be saying,
36:47
Oh, I should have waited longer
36:49
to start that business. Right,
36:49
right. Probably gonna be saying
36:51
like, Oh, I'm glad I did it. I
36:51
wish I would have done it a
36:53
little bit earlier. So do the
36:53
things that work for you really
36:56
make your own path and be
36:56
confident in the steps that
36:59
you're taking.
37:00  Darrell Evans
I love the way
37:00
you put that. Like, don't wait,
37:02
you're not gonna wait longer,
37:02
you're not gonna get to the end
37:04
and say, Boy, I wish I would
37:04
have waited a little longer. And
37:06
it's not gonna get any easier.
37:06
The longer you wait, right, it
37:09
just, you and I agree on this
37:09
point. And you said it videos, I
37:12
watched her. He said, Look,
37:12
entrepreneurship is hard. Let's
37:15
be clear, but so is your job.
37:15
Rational is let's be clear.
37:19
Everything is hard. You know,
37:19
right the world. But hard
37:23
doesn't mean you don't do it. If
37:23
you want to build muscle on your
37:27
body and be a better athletes.
37:27
It's hard to lift weights and
37:29
stay tight on your diet. If you
37:29
want to get through law school.
37:32
It's hard. If you want to build
37:32
a career over a certain period
37:35
of time. It's hard if you're a
37:35
teacher for 30 years and
37:38
education system is hard. There
37:38
are aspects of hard everywhere.
37:41
Don't let hard be an excuse.
37:41
It's going to be hard
37:44
regardless. I love Yeah.
37:44
familiar with Eric Thomas. Oh,
37:47
but okay. Yeah, there was
37:47
something he said some years
37:50
ago, and it was in one of his
37:50
tgim on videos, and but I loved
37:54
what he said something about
37:54
when things get hard. And we you
37:57
know, we may want to cry. He
37:57
said, don't cry to quit cry to
38:00
keep going. Mm hmm. Don't cry to
38:00
quit when it's hard to keep
38:05
going, like the tears come, I
38:05
can tell you my 30 years as a
38:09
grown man, I can't tell you how
38:09
many time tears have left my
38:11
eyes. Right. Right. Right. But
38:11
that's not what shows up on
38:14
social media. Right, but know
38:14
that we're going through that,
38:18
like you're not alone in going
38:18
but we're not sorry, the process
38:21
right now super human, we have
38:21
emotions, just like everybody
38:23
else. There are, you know, and
38:23
the other thing about
38:25
entrepreneurship and love to
38:25
hear your perspective on it. And
38:28
that is there are risks and
38:28
exposures to risk. And real. You
38:34
know, we are putting ourselves
38:34
on the line as entrepreneurs,
38:37
there are so many No, we're
38:37
signing on buildings, and we're
38:40
hiring staff and your lawyer,
38:40
which means that you already
38:43
have extra exposure, because if
38:43
anything you say could be held
38:46
again, you know, I'm saying
38:46
Right, right. You know, go your
38:49
lawyer, so I definitely can go
38:49
after you. So, right. It's very
38:54
interesting. I want to before we
38:54
wrap up, I want to talk a little
38:56
about your community, your
38:56
transcend community, tell us a
38:59
little bit about how your
38:59
coaching your community model
39:02
has been set up? And what
39:02
members are have access to when
39:07
they are working with you.
39:08  Asha Wilkerson
Absolutely,
39:08
thank you for asking. So
39:10
transcend is my vision come to
39:10
life, we're a community of
39:14
resources for black and brown
39:14
entrepreneur, centering the
39:17
stories of black and brown
39:17
entrepreneurs centering the
39:20
needs of our under resourced
39:20
community. So it's open to all
39:24
folks. But our focus is really
39:24
on reaching black and brown
39:27
entrepreneurs, because
39:27
historically, we've been left
39:29
out under resource, right don't
39:29
have the same sort of mentors
39:34
look to because we just haven't
39:34
been able to get to these
39:36
different levels in business. So
39:36
what it is, is it's a monthly
39:39
membership that has a theme each
39:39
month. So last month, we talked
39:43
about building strong business
39:43
foundations. In April, we're
39:47
talking about all things money.
39:47
So bringing in some tax experts,
39:51
bringing in someone to talk
39:51
about building business credit,
39:53
how to get your company ready
39:53
for receiving financing. Next
39:57
month, we're talking about
39:57
contracts, what are the key
39:59
terms that you need to know
39:59
like, what do they mean, right?
40:02
How do you negotiate on a
40:02
contract, and then we'll have
40:04
some templates, intellectual
40:04
properties after that hiring
40:08
employee. So all of the things,
40:08
the resources that I think you
40:12
need as an entrepreneur, so you
40:12
can get them in one place and
40:16
not have to go knock on all
40:16
these different doors or find
40:19
all these different websites to
40:19
figure out what you need to
40:21
know. Right? Even yesterday,
40:21
someone said she was like, gosh,
40:24
Asha, thank you so much for
40:24
bringing in these people.
40:27
Because she was like, it's like
40:27
up here over my head right now.
40:30
She's like, but I know it's
40:30
gonna sink in, it's gonna
40:32
trickle down. It's gonna
40:32
resonate. And this is stuff I
40:35
didn't even know that I needed
40:35
and that the pillars for
40:38
transcend are, I believe, in
40:38
order to build a business and
40:41
leave a legacy. The first thing
40:41
you got to do is have a really
40:44
strong business Foundation, you
40:44
got to have an LLC or a
40:46
corporation, you got to
40:46
understand how to do the
40:49
accounting and keep the books or
40:49
have someone do it for you. And
40:52
you need to get your contracts
40:52
together. Those are like, you
40:55
know, the strong business
40:55
foundation and then build on top
40:58
of that. So the second pillar is
40:58
growing and scaling. How do you
41:01
bring people into your business,
41:01
the revenue, how do you
41:04
streamline it, automate it, that
41:04
kind of thing so it can grow.
41:08
And then once you get to a point
41:08
where it's growing, you can do
41:10
these two things simultaneously.
41:10
The third part is planning for
41:14
the future, leaving a legacy So
41:14
whether that's for you, if
41:17
you're building retirement, you
41:17
know, savings into your
41:20
business, or wanting to pass the
41:20
business on to your children or
41:23
to sell it to somebody or to
41:23
leave it for the community, what
41:27
is it that you're going to do,
41:27
and when you start bringing in
41:30
money, and you have that legacy
41:30
plan, then you can decide where
41:34
the money is gonna go as you're
41:34
bringing it in. So those are the
41:37
three things that I think are
41:37
really important to building a
41:39
business and leaving a legacy.
41:39
And because the information is
41:43
out there, there's a lot that
41:43
you can find on the internet,
41:46
but bringing it to one
41:46
particular place where my
41:50
entrepreneurs only have to sign
41:50
in to one portal, right? And the
41:54
information is there. Like, how
41:54
great is that? I wish I would
41:56
have had this when I was coming
41:56
here.
41:58  Darrell Evans
Right? Awesome. I
41:58
love that, you know, so just a
42:01
couple of comments. And I love
42:01
that there's no shortage of
42:04
information on the worldwide
42:04
interwebs. Google is an amazing
42:07
resource. Let's be clear. But
42:07
listen, there is nothing that
42:11
you're not going to win. It's
42:11
not noble to just spend all your
42:14
hours trying to research stuff
42:14
on your own when you have a
42:16
collection of experts. And when
42:16
you use, I think there's
42:19
something to be said about
42:19
communities who bring in outside
42:21
experts outside of the scope of
42:21
just your own perspective, or
42:25
viewer experience. And there's a
42:25
value to that. And it's a very
42:28
inexpensive investment to be
42:28
associated. I personally, since
42:33
1997, have paid for mentorship
42:33
and or coaching or communities
42:39
like this. And I have paid as
42:39
much as $17,000 a year. And that
42:44
wouldn't be the only one I was
42:44
in that year in addition to
42:47
conferences. So what we're
42:47
saying is, if you're in the
42:51
stages of your business, where
42:51
you're I've never had a business
42:55
where it was run by an attorney.
42:55
So then you know that it's not
42:58
just superficial advice, or some
42:58
of their own best practices,
43:01
which are not bad. But you're
43:01
also getting legal, sir aspect
43:05
of legal advice. And it's not
43:05
just random. I know you made a
43:08
comment about people using
43:08
templates online for contracts
43:11
and whatnot. We don't have time.
43:11
Right, right. Right. But you
43:17
know, the truth of the matter is
43:17
you're putting money on the line
43:20
family online a lot at risk.
43:20
We're in a very litigious
43:23
society, people sue you for any
43:23
and everything. I can't tell you
43:26
how many times we've been either
43:26
threatened to be sued, or and
43:29
people will sue if they can try
43:29
to get out of their own
43:32
responsibility. Absolutely. I'm
43:32
not saying people don't cause
43:36
harm. But I can tell you in my
43:36
world when I've been sued, or
43:39
I've been even threatened, it's
43:39
them trying to not take
43:42
responsibility for their own
43:42
failures, right. The reality is,
43:45
lawsuits cost money.
43:47  Asha Wilkerson
They do they
43:47
absolutely do. Yeah, absolutely.
43:50
Because you got to stand up and
43:50
defend it. Right. So the idea is
43:53
to put yourself in the best
43:53
position to withstand, you know,
43:56
the trouble that's going to come
43:56
because it's gonna come because
43:58
it's like, you're dealing with
43:58
people, you've got real people
44:00
who are your customers. It's
44:00
just that's life. Right? There's
44:04
something else that you said,
44:04
that I wanted to comment on. I
44:07
think it was about, oh, there's
44:07
no nobility, right? And doing
44:11
nine and a half hours of
44:11
research to try and figure
44:13
something out. Yeah. And I think
44:13
that that is something that is
44:18
prevalent in our community where
44:18
we are, we don't trust people,
44:22
right, and we don't trust each
44:22
other. And we're afraid to ask
44:25
for help. Right? So when I
44:25
started teaching, maybe it was
44:28
in law school. One thing I
44:28
noticed is that like, Black and
44:32
Brown students, we had so much
44:32
pride and not needing help. And
44:37
historically, right, we have
44:37
been put in the special ed
44:40
classes and, you know, told we
44:40
couldn't achieve. And so once
44:43
you get to that particular
44:43
level, you don't want any of
44:46
that. But these white students,
44:46
my white classmates, they were
44:49
coming out with all kinds of
44:49
learning disabilities, because
44:51
law school was hard. And they
44:51
wanted some extra help. Not to
44:55
say that they didn't have
44:55
things, but the amount of people
44:57
like how did you get to law
44:57
school is now like now. And
45:02
yeah, now, right? I'm not
45:02
arguing the validity of needing
45:05
help, but just how different
45:05
communities look at needing help
45:10
as an opportunity versus
45:10
something that is negative,
45:14
right? I feel like a lot of
45:14
black communities look at
45:17
needing help with something
45:17
that's negative, it's not true.
45:19
You can't possibly know
45:19
everything, nobody knows
45:22
everything. And there is nothing
45:22
wrong with reaching out to
45:25
somebody who can help you get
45:25
further along. And paying for it
45:30
is a good thing. Like don't just
45:30
try to bootstrap it. And if
45:34
you're worried about paying for
45:34
it, or thinking you don't trust
45:37
people, I challenge you to
45:37
change your mindset, again, from
45:40
scarcity to abundance, there is
45:40
so much to learn. But you have
45:44
to be willing and open to the
45:44
opportunity to be able to do it
45:48
and to take advantage of it.
45:49  Darrell Evans
Well said the
45:49
first thought there's something
45:51
I believe in and that is there's
45:51
something interesting about the
45:54
admission that you don't know.
45:54
And I know that that isn't
45:58
accepted in some environments
45:58
and in some places, but if you
46:01
for example, the minute you open
46:01
yourself to say I don't know,
46:06
but I am interested in willing
46:06
to find out what that answer
46:10
resource might be to solve my
46:10
problem. interesting how the
46:13
world opens up in ways to bring
46:13
you that information. Number
46:16
two, I think that people they
46:16
get caught up without self
46:19
awareness of their own inability
46:19
to learn or progress. I asked an
46:24
interesting question when people
46:24
come to work for me, and it
46:26
always throws them off and I
46:26
say, Tell me three things you
46:29
suck at. And the reason I do
46:29
that they usually pause and I
46:34
may have to repeat the question,
46:34
I get a bewildered Look, I'm
46:37
looking for self awareness. I'm
46:37
looking for them to be honest,
46:39
because I don't like people that
46:39
tell us stuff in interviews just
46:42
so they can get the job. Because
46:42
right, you know, I've run
46:44
smaller teams, like our biggest
46:44
team is 25 people. It's not that
46:48
big of a team. But in my
46:48
companies, you can't hide We
46:51
count on you, right? corporate
46:51
America with 18,000 employees,
46:54
and you can just hide in a
46:54
corner and pretend Yeah, you
46:57
drive impacted my business.
46:57
Okay, exactly. I'm happy to get
47:02
you the resources that what
47:02
you're not good at. But don't
47:04
tell me that you're good at
47:04
everything that don't go right.
47:07
But you know, we have to be
47:07
okay, saying we don't know, we
47:09
have to understand that there's
47:09
mentorship leadership, there's
47:11
communities like yours that are
47:11
there to help. And the
47:14
investment is saving you time,
47:14
believe it or not, it's saving
47:18
you time. I'm in a group right
47:18
now. been in it for seven years.
47:22
And I can't tell you how much
47:22
trouble I have probably avoided
47:26
trouble is just a word I throw
47:26
into the sentence. Right, right.
47:30
Things I would have maybe
47:30
encountered that I would not
47:32
have been prepared for that.
47:32
When I saw it. I was prepared
47:35
because someone else in the
47:35
group had gone through it. We
47:37
get eight speakers a year that
47:37
come in from all sorts of places
47:39
to the head of QVC. I mean, just
47:39
crazy stuff. There are things
47:43
you're going to pick up that
47:43
when you pay for those things.
47:46
You think in the moment maybe I
47:46
don't need it. But then when
47:47
something crosses your path,
47:47
you're like, right, that graph
47:51
to 2016 when I heard so and so
47:51
yes. Such and such. Right.
47:55  Asha Wilkerson
Exactly. And the
47:55
in the networking, right, you're
47:58
in community with people. So if
47:58
you have a particular question,
48:01
you can reach out to them
48:01
probably for free on the end,
48:04
and they can tell you where to
48:04
go for the paid resource, right?
48:07
Yeah,
48:08  Darrell Evans
yeah, the beauty
48:08
of networking. And the beauty of
48:09
community is that when you look
48:09
around as an entrepreneur,
48:12
generally speaking, you don't
48:12
have a wide range of support
48:15
systems and support mechanisms.
48:15
People love you, but they may
48:18
not understand what you're
48:18
doing. So they can't give you
48:21
like you were saying about your
48:21
mom, your mom wants the best for
48:24
you from a safety standpoint.
48:24
And it was the same thing in my
48:27
coming up as an entrepreneur, I
48:27
look left and right to my
48:29
friends, and they're out doing
48:29
other things, what they were
48:32
doing was wrong or doing stuff
48:32
on the other side of the law, it
48:34
was just that they were doing
48:34
other things like jobs. And I
48:37
was saying, No, I'm gonna leave
48:37
a good job and go start a
48:39
business. I'd love for people to
48:39
know where to connect with you
48:43
if they have been inspired by
48:43
your thoughts today. And if they
48:46
are in place in their journey
48:46
where they want to connect with
48:50
you further, whether it's
48:50
through transcend or anywhere
48:52
else online, where shall people
48:52
connect with you.
48:55  Asha Wilkerson
So I hang out
48:55
the most on Instagram and my
48:57
name, there is Asha Wilkerson,
48:57
he s q. And then my website is
49:02
the Wilkerson Law Office calm.
49:02
So that should give you
49:04
everything you need. And if you
49:04
don't find it, then just send me
49:07
a message. And I'll, I'll hook
49:07
you up with some info.
49:10  Darrell Evans
So you have been
49:10
a pleasure to talk with, I
49:13
appreciate your energy, your
49:13
passion, the focus that you have
49:16
to really up, lift and empower
49:16
our entrepreneurial community
49:20
and really help really with this
49:20
conversation around not just
49:24
building a business, but
49:24
building one that leaves a
49:25
legacy. It's something that's
49:25
near and dear to my heart is
49:27
actually something that that
49:27
word legacy crossed my path in
49:30
2004, and five, and so I'm very
49:30
much connected to what I saw in
49:34
your, in your backstory. I
49:34
always like to ask before I let
49:37
you go, if for whatever reason
49:37
you weren't able to be here
49:40
tomorrow on this planet, what
49:40
would you want the world to
49:42
remember you by?
49:43  Asha Wilkerson
I would want the
49:43
people who have come into
49:45
contact with me or just come
49:45
across me to say she said
49:48
something did something showed
49:48
me something that changed
49:51
something else that I did. So I
49:51
hope to leave a positive impact
49:55
that inspires change in people
49:55
right now while I'm living and
49:58
then you know, beyond that, I
49:58
want that to be my legacy.
50:01  Darrell Evans
I love it. Asha,
50:01
thank you for being here.
50:02  Asha Wilkerson
Thank you so
50:02
much.
50:05  The MindShift Podcast
Hey, my
50:05
friend. Thanks again for
50:06
listening today to today's
50:06
episode of the mind shift
50:08
podcast. Listen, let's not have
50:08
the conversation in here.
50:11
connect with me on social at Mr.
50:11
Darrell Evans on almost all the
50:15
platforms. With the exception of
50:15
Facebook. My Facebook fan page
50:18
is at Darryl Evans fan. Until
50:18
next week, remember you're just
50:23
one shift away from the
50:23
breakthrough. You're looking
50:26
for.