Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry is the Center for Inquiry's flagship podcast, where the brightest minds of our time sound off on all the things you're not supposed to talk about at the dinner table: science, religion, and politics. Guests have included Brian Greene, Susan Jacoby, Richard Dawkins, Ann Druyan, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Eugenie Scott, Adam Savage, Bill Nye, and Francis Collins. Point of Inquiry is produced at the Center for Inquiry in Amherst, N.Y.

http://www.pointofinquiry.org

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    Every significant turn towards progress has had its trailblazers, and history can easily forget these pioneering individuals who have helped get us to where we are today. One of the most important figures at the height of the civil rights movement was activist and journalist Ethel Payne, who played a pivotal role as a trailblazer for both women’s rights and civil rights in general, rising to become the first black female commentator employed by a national television network.    James...


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    Gary Taubes: The Bittersweet Truth about the Dangers of Sugar


    Diabetes and obesity are on the rise in America in epidemic proportions, but we don’t respond to it with the urgency of an epidemic. Sugar industry lobbyists work hard to keep regulations at bay, and today sugar can be found in everything from baby formula to cigarettes. There is no customer too young or too old for the sugar industry, and the earlier in a person's life a dependency is developed, the better. Renowned journalist and author Gary Taubes doesn’t sugarcoat how bad our...


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    Science, Stopped at the Border: Jen Golbeck on Science in Trump’s America


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    Murder, Chaos, and Cover-Ups After Hurricane Katrina, with Ronnie Greene


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    Extended Mileage in Someone Else’s Shoes: Ted Conover on Immersive Journalism


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    Daniel Dennett: The Magic of Consciousness…Without the Magic


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    Embargo for America: Andrew W. Cohen on Smuggling and the Rise of a Superpower


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