The Inquiry

One pressing question. Four expert witnesses. Challenging answers. Best Current Affairs Podcast 2017 - British Podcast Awards.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p029399x

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      China is currently developing the biggest infrastructure initiative of all time. Called the Belt and Road initiative, the trillion dollar plans involve working with other Asian countries to build hundreds of new roads, high speed trains, ports and pipelines across continent to mimic the ancient Silk Road trading routes. The project offers a clear economic opportunity, but the diplomatic ties that form as a result could have the potential to change the current world order. Presenter:...


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      Is the Greatest Threat to Putin Really Alexei Navalny?


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      How Do You Report Terrorism?


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      Is Work Too Easy?


      Many of us find our jobs stressful, underpaid and the hours too long. But few would complain about work being less physically strenuous than in the past. And yet, new research shows that the decline in physical activity at work is key to explaining the obesity epidemic. So - is work now too easy? And if it is, can this be reversed? Producers: Estelle Doyle and Phoebe Keane Presenter: Michael Blastland (Photo: Office workers at desks using computers in an office. Credit: Getty...


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      Does Poverty Change The Way We Think?


      Does the experience of poverty actually take a physical toll on your brain? The Inquiry investigates the scientific claims that being poor affects how our brains work. It's well known that children from poorer backgrounds do worse at school. And adults who are poor are often criticised for making bad life decisions - ones that don't help them in the long-term. Some say the problems are rooted in the unfair way our society functions. Others argue it's simple genetics. But a growing body...


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      How Did Immigration Stop Being a Political Taboo in the UK?


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      How Did Venezuela Go From So Rich To So Poor?


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      Is Inequality About to Get Unimaginably Worse?


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      23m
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