Walter Edgar's Journal

From books to barbecue, and current events to Colonial history, historian and author Walter Edgar delves into the arts, culture, and history of South Carolina and the American South. Produced by South Carolina Public Radio.

http://southcarolinapublicradio.org/programs/walter-edgars-journal

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 51m. Bisher sind 297 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint wöchentlich
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South Carolina Between World Wars: Politics


This week on Walter Edgar's Journal , our third program on South Carolina Between the World Wars , features Dr. Vernon Burton of Clemson University, in conversation with Walter Edgar about the politics of the period. During this time, State politics


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   51m
 
 

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Impact of the New Deal


When the stock market crashed in 1929, ushering in the Great Depression, South Carolina was already in dire financial straits. Cotton prices had plummeted, even before the boll weevil had decimated the crop. Years of non-sustainable practices in cotton


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   51m
 
 

South Carolina Between World Wars: The Great Depression


Following World War I, South Carolina’s economy collapsed. The post-World-War-I drop in demand for textiles, the subsequent collapse in cotton prices, the exhaustion of farmland through poor farming practices, and the decimation of cotton crops by the


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   51m
 
 

South Carolina State University: A Black Land-Grant College in Jim Crow America


Since its founding in 1896, South Carolina State University has provided vocational, undergraduate, and graduate education for generations of African Americans. Now the state’s flagship historically black university, it achieved this recognition after


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   51m
 
 

Judge J. Waties Waring and the Secret Plan that Sparked a Civil Rights Movement


Four years before the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education, a federal judge in Charleston hatched his secret plan to end segregation in America. Julius Waties Waring was perhaps the most unlikely civil rights hero in history.


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 2019-12-16  51m
 
 

The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War in the South


As the newly appointed commander of the Southern Continental Army in December 1780, Nathanael Greene quickly realized victory would not only require defeating the British Army, but also subduing the region's brutal civil war. "The division among the


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 2019-12-09  51m
 
 

War Stuff: The Struggle Between Armies and Civilians During the American Civil War


In War Stuff: The Struggle for Human and Environmental Resources in the American Civil War , her path-breaking work on the American Civil War, Joan E. Cashin explores the struggle between armies and civilians over the resources necessary to wage war. This


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 2019-12-02  51m
 
 

Dawson's Fall


In Dawson’s Fall (2019, MacMillan), a novel based on the lives of Roxana Robinson’s great-grandparents, the author tells a story of America at its most fragile, fraught, and malleable. Set in 1889, in Charleston, South Carolina, Robinson’s tale weaves her


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 2019-11-25  51m
 
 

Andrew Jackson: Symbol for an Age?


Andrew Jackson returned to the Oval Office, so to speak, in 2017, when President Donald Trump hung the 7 th President’s portrait there. And, Jackson will return, so to speak, to Upstate South Carolina in June at Greenville Chautauqua’s History Alive


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 2019-11-18  51m
 
 

Daniel Morgan: a Revolutionary Life


On January 17, 1781, at Cowpens, South Carolina, the notorious British cavalry officer Banastre Tarleton and his legion were destroyed along with the cream of Lord Cornwallis’s troops. The man who planned and executed this stunning American victory was


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 2019-11-11  51m