70 Million

This award-winning and Peabody-nominated podcast documents how locals are addressing the role of jails in their backyards. Reporters travel around the country and hear from people directly impacted by their encounter with jails and to chronicle the progress ground-up efforts have made in diversion, bail reform, recidivism, adoption of technology and other crucial aspects of the move toward decarceration at local levels.

http://www.70millionpod.com

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 29m. Bisher sind 52 Folge(n) erschienen. Jede Woche gibt es eine neue Folge dieses Podcasts.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 23 hours 37 minutes

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episode 10: When a State Treats Drug Addiction Like a Health Issue, Not a Crime


A year ago, Oregon became the first state to decriminalize drug possession. The goal is to reverse some of the negative impacts of the War on Drugs by approaching drug use from a health-centered basis. We visit an addiction and recovery center in Portland that’s gearing up for what they hope will be an influx of people seeking treatment. Reported by Cecilia Brown.

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript at our website here.


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 2021-11-15  35m
 
 

episode 9: When “Bail Reform” Isn't


Texas conservative lawmakers and bail reform advocates have long debated what bail reform can look like for those who cannot afford to bail themselves out of jail. Journalist Andrea Henderson looks closely at a new bail law some activists consider a setback. 

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript at our website here.


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 2021-11-08  27m
 
 

episode 8: Taking Mental Health Crises Out of Police Hands


Police encounters during a mental health crisis have a greater chance of turning deadly if you're Black. New response mechanisms bypass law enforcement and result in helpful interventions. Reporter Jeneé Darden looks at how folks in Northern California are trying to reimagine crisis response services. 

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript on our website here.


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 2021-11-01  34m
 
 

episode 7: Forget Reform, They Want Abolition


Many organizers in St. Louis have given up on reforming the criminal legal system. Now, they’re working to abolish it. And they’re starting with the closure of one notorious jail. To reach their goal, they’ve decided to get involved in electoral politics. Reporter Chad Davis takes a look at what happens when you go from agitating from the outside to working with those in power. Co-reported with Carolina Hidalgo.

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript at our website here.


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 2021-10-25  27m
 
 

episode 6: An Effort to Hold Prosecutors Accountable


A legal matrix that incentivizes criminal convictions can motivate unethical prosecutors to bend or break the rules. In New York, a group of law professors is trying to curb that by pushing the system to discipline its own. Reported by Nina Sparling.

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript at our website here.


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 2021-10-18  32m
 
 

episode 5: We Went Back to See How These Reforms Worked


We wanted to see what has happened since we first reported on mental health interventions for arrestees in Miami, how the "bond angels" save lives in New Orleans, and what the digital police surveillance network called Project Greenlight has meant for Detroit. Reported by Danny Rivero, Eve Abrams and Sonia Paul. 

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript at our website here.


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 2021-10-11  38m
 
 

episode 4: Why COVID-19 Goes from Jails to Communities


This special roundtable of experts looks at how policing and incarceration practices are impacting COVID-19 rates in BIPOC communities around the country. 

Because being jailed means an increased risk of getting COVID-19, those released might unknowingly bring the virus home, putting their loved ones and communities at risk...


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 2021-10-04  36m
 
 

episode 3: How Black Women Are Rightfully “Taking Seats at the Table”


Nearly one in two Black women in the US have a loved one who has been impacted by our carceral system. Many become de facto civilian experts as a result. Some rise to lead as outside catalysts for change. And now, scores of Black women are joining the ranks—as officers of the court, police, judges—to manage and advance a system that has had such an outsized impact on their lives. Reported by Pamela Kirkland.

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript at our website here.


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 2021-09-27  29m
 
 

episode 2: Curing “Petty, Everyday Injustice” in Cook County


The saying goes that “justice delayed is justice denied.” One part of Illinois’ judicial system has had an outsized role in delaying justice for decades: the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Home to Chicago, Cook County’s court system is massive, with more than a dozen courthouses generating millions of records. And in the records disarray, residents were mired in years-long delays that cost them time and opportunities. Reported by Mark Betancourt...


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 2021-09-20  36m
 
 

episode 1: Where Juvenile Detention Looks More Like Teens Hanging Out


There’s a place in rural St. Johns, Arizona, where teens who have encounters with officers of the law can play pool, make music, and get mentored instead of going to jail. It’s called The Loft, and it’s the brainchild of a judge who wanted to save the county hundreds of millions of dollars and divert young people towards the support many were not getting at home. Reported by Ruxandra Guidi.

Find a resource guide and annotated transcript at our website here.

 


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 2021-09-13  28m