American History Tellers

The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life - the words you speak, the ideas you share - can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind American Scandal, Tides of History, American Innovations and more.New episodes come out every Wednesday for free, with 1-week early access for Wondery+ subscribers.

https://wondery.com/shows/american-history-tellers/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 39m. Bisher sind 246 Folge(n) erschienen. Jede Woche gibt es eine neue Folge dieses Podcasts.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 6 days 16 hours 30 minutes

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episode 1: Civil Rights - New World A’Comin


President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, freeing the slaves in much of the South. But the road to freedom—true freedom—would take generations longer for most black Americans. In this new six-part series, we investigate their struggle, beginning in the heady post-war years of the Forties. Segregation was endemic; it was the law of the South, and the custom of the North and West. No black American escaped its demeaning and often violent grip...


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 2018-10-03  38m
 
 

episode 2: Civil Rights - Strides Towards Freedom


In 1896, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that segregation was legal, on a “separate but equal” basis. But for more than five decades, life for black and white Americans was seldom equal, but always separate. To fight segregation, the NAACP and others exposed the dismal and debasing conditions in black schools. They won a monumental victory in Brown v. Board of Education—but then a young boy from Chicago named Emmett Till was dredged from the swamps of Mississippi...


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 2018-10-10  36m
 
 

episode 3: Civil Rights - Jim Crow Fights Back


After the Brown V. Board of Education ruling, civil rights activists had legal standing to desegregate schools. But doing so proved dangerous. The first black students to step into newly integrated schools faced extreme hostility from whites who felt Jim Crow society was under attack. The segregationists defied federal court orders...


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 2018-10-17  39m
 
 

episode 4: Civil Rights - Prairie Fire


As the Civil Rights movement entered the Sixties, a new generation of activists took the fore. Frustrated by the pace of progress but emboldened by strides made in the previous decade, students embraced “nonviolent direct action,” protest techniques that were provocative but peaceful. Soon, a wave of sit-ins hit lunch counters across the South...


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 2018-10-24  38m
 
 

episode 5: Civil Rights - On The March


As the Civil Rights movement entered the landmark years of 1963 and 1964, activists had faced many challenges - but had also won many victories. Now, they sought to launch new campaigns in Alabama and Mississippi and mass demonstrations in Washington D.C. and New York City. In the span of sixteen remarkable months, the movement and the nation itself would be transformed, walking the razor’s edge between triumph and tragedy...


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 2018-10-31  46m
 
 

episode 6: Civil Rights - The Unfinished Journey


Seeking to build upon the gains of the early 1960s, Civil Rights activists pushed forward on a series of ambitious efforts. Voting rights activists returned to Alabama and again faced violent reprisal—this time televised for the country to witness. A shocked nation watched the violence in Selma in horror; Congress took action, passing the Voting Rights Act. Off of this success, Martin Luther King Jr...


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 2018-11-07  43m
 
 

episode 7: Civil Rights - Interview with Peggy Trotter Dammond Preacely


We conclude our series on the American Civil Right Movement with an interview with a woman who was there, on the front lines of the fight. Peggy Trotter Dammond Preacely is longtime civil rights activist and artist. She was a Freedom Rider, boarding busses to travel the south in a fight for desegregation, and member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, participating in sit-ins, marches, and voter registration campaigns...


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 2018-11-14  39m
 
 
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