Composers Datebook

Composers Datebook™ is a daily two-minute program designed to inform, engage, and entertain listeners with timely information about composers of the past and present. Each program notes significant or intriguing musical events involving composers of the past and present, with appropriate and accessible music related to each.

http://www.yourclassical.org/programs/composers-datebook/episodes

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 1m. Bisher sind 1679 Folge(n) erschienen. Dies ist ein täglich erscheinender Podcast.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 2 days 7 hours 40 minutes

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A fanfare for Women's History Month


For most of the 20th century, women's history was almost totally ignored in American schools. To address this situation, an Education Task Force in Sonoma County, California, initiated a "Women's History" celebration in March of 1978. What began as an annual “Women’s History Week” grew over the years into a national celebration, and in 1987, Congress declared the whole of March to be Women's History Month...


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Pizzetti in New York


For most music lovers, the phrase “Italian composers of the 19th and 20th centuries” means first and foremost OPERA composers. But during the 1920s and 1930s, when the great Italian opera conductor Arturo Toscanini was music director of the New York Philharmonic, American audiences heard many non-operatic, symphonic works by modern Italian composers...


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Viktor Kalabis


Today’s date marks the birthday of a 20th century Czech composer you perhaps have never heard of. Viktor Kalabis was born in 1923 and by age 6, was giving public piano performances. All the signs pointed to a brilliant career. But first Kalabis had to face – and surmount–two major political hurdles...


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Chopin debuts in Paris


On today’s date in 1832, the Polish pianist and composer Frederic Chopin made his concert debut in Paris at the Salle Pleyel. Among the enthusiastic audience members was another composer-pianist by the name of Franz Liszt, who would rapidly become Chopin’s close friend and advocate. Chopin dedicated his recently completed Piano Etudes, Op...


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Michael Daugherty's "Brooklyn Bridge"


“Pssst… Hey buddy–wanna buy a bridge?… No? Well, how about a Clarinet Concerto, then?” As most of us know, the Brooklyn Bridge is not for sale, but this New York icon has reputedly been sold to many unsuspecting visitors. After its opening in 1883, Harper's Monthly wrote, "The wise man will not cross the bridge in five minutes, nor in twenty, [but] will linger to get the good of the splendid view about him...


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Rorem's "Our Town"


It’s a play that both Aaron Copland and Leonard Bernstein wanted to make into an opera, but the playwright always said, “No.” We’re talking about “Our Town” by Thornton Wilder, a nostalgic but bitter-sweet look at life and love and death in Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire, set in the early 1900, complete with white picket fences, boy meets girl, and a drugstore soda counter...


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Danny Elfman at Carnegie Hall


The American composer Daniel Robert "Danny" Elfman is best known for writing the opening theme of The Simpsons and for scoring movies directed by his friend Tim Burton. But on today’s date in 2005, Elfman had, for him, a rather unusual experience—namely, hearing some of his music played live at Carnegie Hall when the American Composers Orchestra gave the premiere of “Serenada Schizophrana,” his first-ever foray into composing a symphonic concert work...


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Lowell Liebermann


In recounting the life story of many composers, it’s a familiar and perhaps Romantic cliché that their work will be—as a matter of course—NOT appreciated by their contemporaries, and that the composer in question will have to toil for years in obscurity before his or her music is appreciated by performers and audiences. In reality, we’re happy to report, that isn’t always the case. Consider, for example, the American composer Lowell Liebermann, who was born in New York on today’s date in 1961...


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Cowell for winds


Henry Cowell was one of the most prolific of all 20th century American composers. Some of his works are aggressively experimental in nature, while others tap into folk traditions and world music. The range and variety are quite remarkable. Cowell wrote so many works, in fact, that even the composer himself often had trouble keeping track of all he had written. Take this genial little Woodwind Quintet, for example...


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Bach and Handel on a date?


In 1724, February 20th fell on a Sunday, and at St. Thomas Church in Leipzig “Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe,” or, in English: “Jesus gathered the twelve to Himself,” a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach was performed as part of the Sunday service. Meanwhile, on February 20th in London that same year, audiences at the King’s Theater in the Haymarket heard the premiere of “Giulio Cesare in Egitto” or, “Julius Caesar in Egypt,” a new Italian opera by George Frideric Handel...


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