Composers Datebook

Composers Datebook™ is a daily two-minute program designed to inform, engage, and entertain listeners with timely information about composers of the past and present. Each program notes significant or intriguing musical events involving composers of the past and present, with appropriate and accessible music related to each.

http://www.yourclassical.org/programs/composers-datebook/episodes

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 1m. Bisher sind 1581 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint täglich
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How to Pray


At Carnegie Hall on today’s date in 2002, the American Composers Orchestra presented new works inspired by the Hebrew Psalms. The program included the premiere of a new work by the American composer David Lang entitled “How to Pray.” In his program note, Lang wrote: “[The] Psalms are so central to religious experience [because] they are a comprehensive catalogue of how to talk to the Almighty... Of course, it's like reading one side of a correspondence... I am not a religious person...


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Mozart and "Amadeus"


On today’s date in 1979 a new play by Peter Schaffer titled “Amadeus” opened at the National Theatre in London. Schaffer’s play tells the story of Mozart’s final years in Vienna, including some posthumous gossip that it was the petty jealousy and back-stabbing intrigue of Mozart’s Italian contemporary Antonio Salieri that hastened Wolfgang’s untimely demise. There was even a Romantic legend that Salieri had actually poisoned Mozart, a legend Shaffer gave a psychological spin...


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Chopin gets out of town


On today’s date in 1830, the Polish composer Frederic Chopin said farewell to his native land at a bon voyage dinner thrown by his friends in Warsaw. It was all quite jolly, with singing, dancing, and drinking lasting well into the night. On a more melancholy note, Romantic legend has it that someone presented Chopin with a vessel of Polish soil, which ended up being buried with him when he died in Paris 19 years later...


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Hovhaness in "HOOS-ton"


On today’s date in 1955, Leopold Stokowski gave his first concert as the new music director of the Houston Symphony—or, as Stoki pronounced it, the “HOOSTON Symphony.” It was a major cultural event in those days. NBC even televised a bit of the famously white-maned conductor rehearsing the Texans in a brand-new work that Stokowski himself had commissioned for the occasion: the second symphony of Alan Hovhaness, subtitled “Mysterious Mountain...


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Heggie's "Great Scott"


The American opera composer Jake Heggie and his librettist Terrence McNally decided to follow their “Dead Man Walking”–a successful but harrowing opera about capital punishment–with a lighter, more comic work, entitled “Great Scott...


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Handel advertises his wares


On today’s date in 1739, Mr. George Frideric Handel took out an advertisement, announcing that he was now accepting subscriptions for his new set of 12 Grand Concertos for strings. He had, in fact, finished the first concerto one month before, on September 29th, and spent the next five weeks polishing off the other 11 at the rate of one every two or three days. Handel’s publisher was John Walsh, Jr, who had a shop in London at the sign of the harp and oboe in Catherine Street on the Strand...


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A "pathetic" symphony by Tchaikovsky


In St. Petersburg on today’s date in 1893, Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted the first performance of his latest Symphony, his Sixth. From the beginning, this symphony has been commonly known by its French subtitle, the “Pathétique,” a designation suggested by the composer’s brother, Modest...


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"Eating Greens" with Mackey


On today’s date in 1994, Dennis Russell Davies conducted the Chicago Symphony in the premiere performance of a 23-minute orchestral work by the American composer Steven Mackey. The new piece was titled “Eating Greens,” after a painting of the same name that the composer purchased at an African art store in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Mackey’s “Eating Greens” is a colorful orchestral suite of seven movements...


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Robert Ward panned and prized


For composers of new operas, all too often, after the heady champagne of opening night comes the strong black coffee of “the morning after”—sipped anxiously while reading the first reviews. Imagine yourself the American composer Robert Ward, whose opera “The Crucible” was premiered by the New York City Opera on today’s date in 1961...


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Corigliano's "Poem in October"


On today’s date in 1970, a new chamber work by the American composer John Corigliano received its premiere performance at a concert given by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the group that had commissioned it. The new piece, titled “Poem in October,” was scored for tenor voice and eight instruments and was a setting of poetry by Dylan Thomas, the great Welsh poet who died in 1953. “The thing that most appeals to me is the sound of his words,” explained Corigliano...


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