Conversations at the Washington Library

Conversations at the Washington Library is the premier podcast about George Washington and his Early American world. Join host Jim Ambuske as he talks with scholars, digital humanists, librarians, and other guests about Washington's era and the way we tell stories about the past.

https://www.georgewashingtonpodcast.com

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 45m. Bisher sind 228 Folge(n) erschienen. Dies ist ein wöchentlich erscheinender Podcast.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 7 days 6 hours 20 minutes

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episode 224: 224. Unpacking the Slave Empire with Dr. Padraic Scanlan


In the early decades of the nineteenth century, the British Empire began dismantling the slave system that had helped to build it. Parliament banned the transatlantic slave trade in 1807, and in 1833 the government outlawed slavery itself, accomplishing through legislative action what the United States would later achieve in part by the horrors of civil war...


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 2022-06-25  40m
 
 

episode 223: 223. Attending a Lecture on Female Genius with Dr. Mary Sarah Bilder


In May 1787, George Washington arrived in Philadelphia to attend the Constitutional Convention. One afternoon, as he waited for the other delegates to show up so the convention could begin, Washington accompanied some ladies to a public lecture at the University of Pennsylvania by a woman named Eliza Harriot Barons O’Conner. Eliza Harriot, as she signed her name, had led a transatlantic life steeped in revolutionary ideas...


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 2022-05-19  42m
 
 

episode 6: Introducing Intertwined Stories: Finding Hercules Posey


We're delighted to bring you one of the bonus episodes from our other podcast, Intertwined: The Enslaved Community at George Washington’s Mount Vernon.

In Intertwined Stories, we're featuring extended interviews with some of the expert contributors to the main Intertwined show.

Today, you'll hear part of the conversation that Jim Ambuske and Jeanette Patrick had with Ramin Ganeshram about Hercules Posey...


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 2022-04-06  19m
 
 

episode 222: 222. Winning a "Compleat Victory" at Saratoga with Dr. Kevin Weddle


The Battle of Saratoga in September and October of 1777 was a decisive turning point in the American War for Independence. The American victory over the British in northern New York put a stopper to London’s dreams of a swift end to the war, and convinced the French to openly declare their support for the colonial rebels. It was, in the words of one American participant, a "Compleat Victory...


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 2022-03-25  48m
 
 

episode 221: 221. Reading the Political Poetry of Hannah Lawrence Schieffelin with Dr. Kait Tonti


Hannah Lawrence Schieffelin was an American poet who rhymed about some of the most important issues facing the early United States in the eighteenth century, including the British occupation of New York City during the American Revolution, the debate over the gradual abolition of slavery in the early days of the republic, and the legacy of George Washington...


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 2022-03-09  55m
 
 

episode 220: 220. Educating Early Americans with Drs. Mark Boonshoft and Andrew O'Shaughnessy


In eighteenth-century America,  you would’ve had little opportunity for formal schooling or an advanced education. Unless you were among the elite or at least of some means, your chances of attending a local academy or Harvard College weren’t great. But the American Revolution ushered in a new era of education in the United States that paved the way for the educational opportunities we take for granted today...


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 2022-02-18  1h4m
 
 

episode 219: 219. Negotiating Federal-State Relations with Dr. Grace Mallon


For years after the ratification of the Constitution, Americans debated how the Federal Government and the several states should relate to each other, and work together, to form a more perfect union. The success, if not the survival, of the new republic depended on these governments cooperating on any number of issues, from customs enforcement to Native American policy. But where there was collaboration there was also friction among them over matters like state sovereignty, slavery, and land...


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 2022-02-02  44m
 
 

episode 221: 218. Finding Washington at the Plow with Dr. Bruce Ragsdale


In the 1760s, tobacco was one of Virginia’s chief exports. But George Washington turned away from the noxious plant and began dreaming of wheat and a more profitable future. Washington became enamored with new ideas powering the agricultural revolution in Great Britain and set out to implement this new form of husbandry back home at Mount Vernon...


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 2022-01-20  45m
 
 

episode 217: 217. Exploring Star Territory with Dr. Gordon Fraser


In the 18th and 19th centuries, North Americans looked up at the sky in wonder at the cosmos and what lay beyond earth’s atmosphere. But astronomers like Benjamin Banneker, Georgia surveyors, Cherokee storytellers, and government officials also saw in the stars ways to master space on earth by controlling the heavens above. And print technology became a key way for Americans of all stripes to find ways to understand their own place in the universe and their relationship to each other...


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 2022-01-06  51m
 
 

episode 216: 216. Digitally Deconstructing the Constitution with Dr. Nicholas Cole


When delegates assembled in Philadelphia in the Summer of 1787 to write a new Constitution, they spent months in secret writing a document they hoped would form a more perfect Union. When we talk about the convention, we often talk of the Virginia Plan, the Connecticut Compromise, the 3/5ths clause, and other major decisions that shaped the final document...


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 2021-12-23  47m