Environmental Almanac

Weekly commentaries on the environment and appreciating the natural world, by Rob Kanter from the School of Earth, Society, and Environment at the University of Illinois.

https://will.illinois.edu/environmentalalmanac/rss

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 4m. Bisher sind 156 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint wöchentlich
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A month of welcome changes


Migrating birds, breeding amphibians, and the flowering of skunk cabbage--tune in this week to enjoy thinking about the coming of spring.


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 2019-02-08  4m
 
 

A month of welcome changes


Migrating birds, breeding amphibians, and the flowering of skunk cabbage--tune in this week to enjoy thinking about the coming of spring.


share





 2019-02-08  4m
 
 

A month of welcome changes


Migrating birds, breeding amphibians, and the flowering of skunk cabbage--tune in this week to enjoy thinking about the coming of spring.


share





 2019-02-08  4m
 
 

All Welcome at Presentations on Waterway Health in Vermilion River Sysem


What do rain gardens, agriculture, and coal-burning power plants have in common? They all connect us with local waterways, which in turn connect us to the wider world. Presentations in the "All Connected" series at the University of Illinois this spring will explore how.


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 2019-01-17  4m
 
 

All Welcome at Presentations on Waterway Health in Vermilion River Sysem


What do rain gardens, agriculture, and coal-burning power plants have in common? They all connect us with local waterways, which in turn connect us to the wider world. Presentations in the "All Connected" series at the University of Illinois this spring will explore how.


share





 2019-01-17  4m
 
 

All Welcome at Presentations on Waterway Health in Vermilion River Sysem


What do rain gardens, agriculture, and coal-burning power plants have in common? They all connect us with local waterways, which in turn connect us to the wider world. Presentations in the "All Connected" series at the University of Illinois this spring will explore how.


share





 2019-01-17  4m
 
 

Dark skies benefit people and wildlife


Most people understand that various products of human activity have the potential to harm wildlife when they’re released into the world, and we routinely call these products “pollutants.” Fewer people are accustomed to thinking of carelessly spread artificial light that way, but a growing body of evidence makes it clear we should.


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 2018-12-20  4m
 
 

Dark skies benefit people and wildlife


Most people understand that various products of human activity have the potential to harm wildlife when they’re released into the world, and we routinely call these products “pollutants.” Fewer people are accustomed to thinking of carelessly spread artificial light that way, but a growing body of evidence makes it clear we should.


share





 2018-12-20  4m
 
 

Dark skies benefit people and wildlife


Most people understand that various products of human activity have the potential to harm wildlife when they’re released into the world, and we routinely call these products “pollutants.” Fewer people are accustomed to thinking of carelessly spread artificial light that way, but a growing body of evidence makes it clear we should.


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 2018-12-20  4m
 
 

Curiosity plus old-school science produce new understanding


Can science still advance through the use of a simple microscope? Tune in to learn how.


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 2018-11-01  4m