Freakonomics Radio

Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. The entire archive, going back to 2010, is available on the Stitcher podcast app and at freakonomics.com.

http://freakonomics.com/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 38m. Bisher sind 558 Folge(n) erschienen. Dies ist ein wöchentlich erscheinender Podcast
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