Jam Logs, the Podcast of The 1937 Flood

Freebies from The 1937 Flood, West Virginia's Most Eclectic String Band! The Flood, the Original Old Boy Band, has been around since the 1970s playing their own brand of mountain music, from blues and jugband to swing and traditional folk. These podcasts feature Flood Freebies, recordings captured on the fly, as it were, at the guys' weekly jam sessions in Huntington, WV

http://jamlogs.blogspot.com/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 4m. Bisher sind 294 Folge(n) erschienen. Jede Woche gibt es eine neue Folge dieses Podcasts.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 12 hours 21 minutes

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Yellow Dog Blues


 It’s not every song that has an historical marker devoted to it beside the highway. But then it’s not every song that has the privilege of being composed by the great W.C. Handy. It’s hard to imagine what the early days of jazz would have been like


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Lorena


Often at rehearsals, between tunes we’re planning to work on, Doug Chaffin will just start playing a song that’s been on his mind, and lately that tune has been a sweet antebellum melody called “Lorena.” Now, while the song is of decidedly Northern origi


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Summertime


 George Gershwin’s 1935 composition “Summertime” is probably the most frequently covered song in all the world. Some estimate that there have been at least 25,000 recorded versions, many of them classic jazz renditions, of course, but also in every


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I Almost Lost My Mind


 Before rock ’n’ roll was a thing, it was rhythm and blues that was perking up the ears of a generation of young radio listeners, and tops among the early R&B songwriters was Ivory Joe Hunter, the original “Baron of the Boogie.” Ivory Joe — by t


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Memphis in June


 Back in the days when we would ride on — and occasionally even got to perform on — the good ol’ Delta Queen steamboat, it often meant a reunion with a dear friend, the boat’s band leader, the legendary New Orleans cornetist Connie Jones. We learned


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Dead Cat on the Line


 While we are regularly reminded that they nailed Socrates for corrupting the youth, we do sometimes feel obliged to enlighten the younger members of our audience as to the origins of some of the bluer material in our repertoire. This song, for exam


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 2021-03-17  n/a
 
 

Golden Apples of the Sun


 More than a century ago, the Irish poet William Butler Yeats wrote an amazing verse called “The Song of Wandering Aengus.” In it an old man remembers a mystical experience in his youth, in which a silver trout he’d just fished from a stream suddenl


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 2021-03-10  n/a
 
 

At Last


One of the many frustrating things about this time of COVID, of course, is that we so seldom have gotten to see some of our dearest companions. And as you can imagine, for a band, well, that’s just devastating. It’s been months, for instance, since we’ve


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 2021-03-03  n/a
 
 

Willow Weep for Me


 It’s uncommon for a songwriter to dedicate a composition to another composer, but Ann Ronell said she had to dedicate her 1932 masterpiece to her friend and mentor George Gershwin. ““George was sacred to me,” she said many years later. “He was my i


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 2021-02-24  n/a
 
 

(When She Wants Good Lovin') My Baby Comes to Me


 Many of us grew up listening to The Coasters, the iconic 1950s band that bridged the gap between doowop and R&B, that brought humor and sass to the birth of rock ’n’ roll. “Yakety Yak” and “Charlie Brown,” “Along Came Jones” and “Poison Ivy,” “


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 2021-02-17  n/a