New Books in Environmental Studies

Interviews with Environmental Scientists about their New Books

https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/science-technology/environmental-studies/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 53m. Bisher sind 225 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint wöchentlich
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Char Miller, “Public Lands, Public Debates: A Century of Controversy” (Oregon State University Press, 2012)


From illicit marijuana farms wedged deep in the canyons of the Angeles National Forest to the fire-bombed laboratories of the University of Washington, Char Miller takes readers on a wild romp through the contests, debates,


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 2012-04-09  46m
 
 

Anthony Penna, "The Human Footprint: A Global Environmental History" (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)


One of the most disturbing insights made by practitioners of "Big History" is that the distinction between geologic time and human time has collapsed in our era. The forces that drove geologic time–plate tectonics, the orientation of the Earth’s axis…


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 2011-07-18  1h2m
 
 

Charles Emmerson, "The Future History of the Arctic: How Climate, Resources and Geopolitics are Reshaping the North, and Why it Matters to the World" (Vintage, 2010)


I don’t know how many young boys develop a fascination with the world from having a map of the world hung above their beds, but this certainly fits in with the experiences of both Charles Emmerson and myself. Charles’ interest…


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 2011-05-23  54m
 
 

James Fleming, "Fixing the Sky: The Checkered History of Weather and Climate Control" (Columbia UP, 2010)


In the summer of 2008 the Chinese were worried about rain. They were set to host the Summer Olympics that year, and they wanted clear skies. Surely clear skies, they must have thought, would show the world that China had…


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 2010-10-20  1h0m
 
 

Donald Worster, "A Passion for Nature: The Life of John Muir" (Oxford UP, 2008)


If you study pre-modern history in any depth, one of the most startling things you will discover is that "traditional" societies usually had an adversarial relationship with "nature." They fought the wild tooth and nail in a never-ending effort to…


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 2008-12-05  1h2m