New Books in Genocide Studies

Interviews with Scholars of Genocide about their New Books

https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/politics-society/genocide-studies/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 1h0m. Bisher sind 178 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint jede zweite Woche
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Richard Rashke, “Useful Enemies: John Demjanjuk and America’s Open-Door Policy for Nazi War Criminals” (Delphinium, 2013)


You may have heard of a fellow named Ivan or John Demjanuik. He made the news–repeatedly over a 30 year period– because he was, as many people probably remember, a Nazi war criminal nick-named “Ivan the Terrible” for his brutal…


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 2013-04-19  1h18m
 
 

Donald Bloxham, “The Final Solution: A Genocide” (Oxford UP, 2009)


The end of the Cold War dramatically changed research into the Holocaust. The gradual opening up of archives across Eastern Europe allowed a flood of local and regional studies that transformed our understanding of the Final Solution. We now know…


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 2013-02-12  1h10m
 
 

John K. Roth and Carol Rittner, “Rape: Weapon of War and Genocide” (Paragon House, 2012)


While reading about genocide and mass violence should always be be disturbing, a certain numbness sets in over time. Every once in a while, however, a book breaks through that numbness to remind the reader of the horror inherent in…


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 2013-01-10  1h7m
 
 

Lee Ann Fujii, “Killing Neighbors: Webs of Violence in Rwanda” (Cornell UP, 2009)


The question Lee Ann Fujii asks in her new book Killing Neighbors: Webs of Violence in Rwanda (Cornell University Press, 2009) is a traditional one in genocide studies. Her research builds on earlier scholars such as Christopher Browning, James Waller…


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 2012-12-21  1h9m
 
 

Mary Fulbrook, “A Small Near Town Auschwitz: Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust” (Oxford UP, 2012)


The question of how “ordinary Germans” managed to commit genocide is a classic (and troubling) one in modern historiography. It’s been well studied and so it’s hard to say anything new about it. But Mary Fulbrook has done precisely that…


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 2012-12-19  1h0m
 
 

Marek Jan Chodakiewicz, “The Massacre in Jedwabne, July 10, 1941: Before, During, After” (Columbia UP, 2005)


On July 10, 1941, Poles in the town of Jedwabne together with some number of German functionaries herded nearly 500 Jews into a barn and burnt them alive. In 2000, the sociologist Jan Gross published a book about the subject…


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 2012-11-08  1h8m
 
 

Christian Gerlach, “Extremely Violent Societies in the Twentieth Century” (Cambridge UP, 2010)


What if genocide scholars have been approaching the field the wrong way? When I first opened Extremely Violent Societies in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2010), I was immediately struck by the immense depth of research and learnin...


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 2012-10-13  1h9m
 
 

Brendan C. Lindsay, “Murder State: California’s Native American Genocide, 1846-1873” (University of Nebraska Press, 2012)


Brendan C. Lindsay‘s impressive if deeply troubling new book centers on two concepts long considered anathema: democracy and genocide. One is an ideal of self-government, the other history’s most unspeakable crime. Yet as Lindsay deftly describes,


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 2012-09-09  57m
 
 

Gina Chon and Sambeth Thet, “Behind the Killing Fields: A Khmer Rouge Leader and One of his Victims” (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010)


I’m not sure what it would feel like to interview a leader of a genocidal regime. Asking why people decide it is right and necessary to kill many thousands is one of the standard questions in genocide studies. But it…


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 2012-08-25  58m
 
 

Timothy Snyder, “Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin” (Basic Books, 2011)


Neville Chamberlain described Czechoslovakia as a far away land we know little about. He could have said it about any of the countries of east-central Europe. Yet, for the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany east-central Europe, was of prime importance…


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 2011-10-25  1h1m