New Books Network

Podcasts with Authors about their New Books

https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/new-books-network/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 54m. Bisher sind 6529 Folge(n) erschienen.
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George Hunka, “Word Made Flesh: Philosophy, Eros, and Contemporary Tragic Drama” (Eyecorner Press, 2011)


George Hunka’s book Word Made Flesh: Philosophy, Eros, and Contemporary Tragic Drama (Eyecorner Press, 2011) offers a series of challenges, provocations and meditations on Theatre (with a capital “T”). It’s a valuable piece of work to wrestle with,


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 2011-05-01  1h7m
 
 

Bhanu Athaiya, “The Art of Costume Design” (HarperCollins, 2010)


Bollywood, the Hindustani film genre based in Mumbai (formerly Bombay), has long been known for its lavish costumes and sets. Now comes a sumptuous book from a master costume designer, and the first ever Indian to win an Oscar,


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 2011-05-01  1h7m
 
 

David Shneer, “Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust” (Rutgers UP, 2010)


We should be skeptical of what is sometimes called “Jew counting” and all it implies. Yet it cannot be denied that Jews played a pivotal and (dare we say) disproportionate role in moving the West from a pre-modern to a modern condition.


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 2011-04-29  1h9m
 
 

Laurie Manchester, “Holy Fathers, Secular Sons: Clergy, Intelligentsia, and the Modern Self in Revolutionary Russia” (NI UP, 2008)


The lives, let alone the fates, of Imperial Russia’s priesthood have garnered little attention among historians. I think the reason is partially because the research of most Russian historians has been focused on explaining the country’s torturous mode...


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 2011-04-24  54m
 
 

Elizabeth Pisani, “The Wisdom of Whores: Bureaucrats, Brothels, and the Business of AIDS” (Norton, 2008)


When in medical school, I found myself drawn to the study of infectious diseases in large part because of the mixture of science and anthropology – infectious diseases are always about the way we interact with the world around us,


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 2011-04-24  59m
 
 

Stewart A. Baker, “Skating on Stilts: Why We Aren’t Stopping Tomorrow’s Terrorism” (Hoover Institution, 2010)


How do government officials decide key homeland security questions? How do those decisions affect our day to day lives? In Skating on Stilts: Why We Aren’t Stopping Tomorrow’s Terrorism (Hoover Institution, 2010), Stewart Baker,


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 2011-04-22  51m
 
 

Robert Citino, “Death of the Wehrmacht: The German Campaigns of 1942” (UP of Kansas, 2007)


Robert Citino is one of a handful of scholars working in German military history whose books I would describe as reliably rewarding. Even when one quibbles with some of the details of his argument, one is sure to profit from reading his work.


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 2011-04-22  1h3m
 
 

Michael A. Reynolds, “Shattering Empires: The Clash and Collapse of the Ottoman and Russian Empires, 1908-1918” (Cambridge UP, 2011)


Most of us live in a world of nations. If you were born and live in the Republic of X, then you probably speak X-ian, are a citizen of X, and would gladly fight and die for your X-ian brothers and sisters. If, however, you were born and live in...


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 2011-04-22  1h7m
 
 

Martin Denton, “Plays and Playwrights 2011” (NYTE, 2011)


The world of “Off-Off Broadway” has been fertile soil for new American plays for decades. Since the late 1990s, one of its most fervent boosters and chroniclers has been Martin Denton, the founder of nytheatre.


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 2011-04-20  1h7m
 
 

Francesco Duina, “Winning: Reflections on an American Obsession” (Princeton University Press, 2010)


“Winning is everything” is such a common phrase that we rarely question where it comes from and why we apply it to everyday experiences.  One can win a little league game, an election, the lottery, a friendly competition at work or an unfriendly one.


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 2011-04-17  55m