New Books Network

Podcasts with Authors about their New Books

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Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 54m. Bisher sind 7500 Folge(n) erschienen.
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Joe Maiolo, “Cry Havoc: How the Arms Race Drove the World to War, 1931-1941” (Basic Books, 2010)


In Cry Havoc: How the Arms Race Drove the World to War, 1931-1941 (Basic Books, 2010), Joe Maiolo proposes (I want to write “demonstrates,” but please read the book and judge for yourself) two remarkably insightful theses.


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 2010-11-12  1h0m
 
 

David Farber, “The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism” (Princeton UP, 2010)


I think that many smart people, particularly on the Left, make a really ill-considered assumption, to wit, that “Republican” means “Conservative.” I don’t mean lower case “c” conservative, as in wanting to maintain the status quo.


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 2010-11-05  1h6m
 
 

Abbott Gleason, “A Liberal Education” (TidePool Press, 2010)


I fear that most people think that “history” is “the past” and that the one and the other live in books. But it just ain’t so. History is a story we tell about the past, or rather some small portion of it. The past itself is gone and cannot, outside...


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 2010-10-28  1h21m
 
 

James Fleming, “Fixing the Sky: The Checkered History of Weather and Climate Control” (Columbia UP, 2010)


In the summer of 2008 the Chinese were worried about rain. They were set to host the Summer Olympics that year, and they wanted clear skies. Surely clear skies, they must have thought, would show the world that China had arrived.


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 2010-10-20  1h1m
 
 

Aram Goudsouzian, “King of the Court: Bill Russell and the Basketball Revolution” (University of California, 2010)


I imagine the guys who first faced Bill Russell felt like I did when I had to guard Antoine Carr in high school. I “held” Carr to 32 points. But no dunks! Russell’s opponents in college and the NBA rarely fared any better.


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 2010-10-12  1h3m
 
 

David Schimmelpenninck van der Oye, “Russian Orientalism” (Yale UP, 2010)


There’s a saying, sometimes attributed to Napoleon, “Scratch a Russian and you find a Tatar.” I’ve scratched a Russian (I won’t say anything more about that) and I can tell you that the saying is false: all I found was more Russian. It’s true,


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 2010-10-08  1h0m
 
 

Fred Spier, “Big History and the Future of Humanity” (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)


My son Isaiah likes to play the “why” game. Isaiah: “Why is my ice cream gone?” Me: “Because you ate it.” Isaiah: “Why did I eat it?” Me: “Because you need food.” Isaiah: “Why do I need food?” And so on. Isaiah naturally wants to know why things are th...


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 2010-10-01  1h1m
 
 

Norman Naimark, “Stalin’s Genocides” (Princeton UP, 2010)


Absolutely no one doubts that Stalin murdered millions of people in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. His ruthless campaign of “dekulakization,” his pitiless deportation of “unreliable” ethnic groups, his senseless starvation of Ukrainian peasants,


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 2010-09-24  1h12m
 
 

Thomas Kessner, “The Flight of the Century: Charles Lindbergh & the Rise of American Aviation” (Oxford UP, 2010)


Try to imagine having never seen an airplane. It’s hard. Aircraft are an ordinary part of our daily experience. Just look up and you’ll probably see one, or at least its vapor trails. Go to your local airport and you can fly in one pretty inexpensively...


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 2010-09-15  1h5m
 
 

Kip Kosek, “Acts of Conscience: Christian Nonviolence and Modern American Democracy” (Columbia UP, 2010)


There’s a quip that goes “Christianity is probably a great religion. Someone should really try it.” The implication, of course, is that most people who call themselves Christians aren’t very Christian at all. And, in truth,


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 2010-09-10  1h5m