Ridiculous History

History is beautiful, brutal and, often, ridiculous. Join Ben Bowlin and Noel Brown as they dive into some of the weirdest stories from across the span of human civilization in Ridiculous History, a podcast by iHeartRadio.

https://www.iheart.com/podcast/105-ridiculous-history-28588696/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 42m. Bisher sind 444 Folge(n) erschienen. Alle 2 Tage erscheint eine Folge dieses Podcasts.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 13 days 4 hours 37 minutes

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When People Thought They Were Made of Glass


In 1422, King Charles VI died after ruling France for more than 40 years. He was also remembered as Charles the Mad, in part because he was convinced that his body was made of glass and would shatter upon contact with other people. This condition, known a


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 2017-11-30  35m
 
 

Nazis, Churchill and Chocolate


When Lord Victor Rothschild first heard the news, he was incredulous -- surely Nazi Germany wasn't seriously planning to assassinate Winston Churchill with an exploding chocolate bar. However, Rothschild learned the intelligence reports were solid and was


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 2017-11-28  34m
 
 

When (and why) did the US start calling its citizens consumers?


Today, the terms "citizen" and "consumer" are often used interchangeably by authors, journalists and politicians. To some experts, this shift has disturbing implications. But how important is a word? How did this switch occur, and why?


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 2017-11-23  47m
 
 

Does the US Confederacy still exist in Americana, Brazil?


At the close the US Civil War, tens of thousands of former Confederate families fled the US for a small city in Brazil, where they sought to continue living as they had in the days before the war. Tune in to learn more about the strange history of America


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 2017-11-21  40m
 
 

Did a real-life rainmaker almost drown San Diego?


Charles Mallory Hatfield considered himself a real-life rainmaker (or, as he preferred to describe himself, a 'moisture accelerator') and, when San Diego faced one of its most damaging droughts, Hatfield cracked a deal: He'd bring the water back to San Di


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 2017-11-16  35m
 
 

X-Rays, Songs and Soviets: The Stilyagi Story


Caught between the conflicting ideologies of the Cold War, Soviet teens were banned from collecting Western music -- smuggled records could be both rare and expensive. The solution? Discarded X-rays, also known as 'bone recordings'. Join the guys as they


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 2017-11-14  38m
 
 

Who solves murders in Antarctica?


Antarctica is home to one of the most brutal climates on the planet, and the few humans living on this continent face profound isolation and cramped quarters. Often, tension rises as the months between supply runs pile up -- so what happens when something


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 2017-11-09  34m
 
 

How White America Tried to Destroy Chinese Restaurants


Today Chinese restaurants serve some of the most popular cuisine in the United States, with more than 41,000 restaurants scattered around the country. Yet in the 1900s these restaurants were so controversial that labor unions, hate groups and even politic


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 2017-11-07  42m
 
 

Butter: Protestantism's Secret Ingredient?


The Protestant Reformation remains one of the most significant cultural events in the Western world. Martin Luther's 95 Theses addressed numerous concerns with the Catholic church, including corruption and the practice of granting dispensations -- allowin


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 2017-11-02  42m
 
 

Wharram Percy Versus The Undead


Humanity has always had a fascination with -- and fear of -- the dead. And when the small medieval village of Wharram Percy felt they might become victims of the undead, they took drastic, grisly action, committing an atrocity that would not be uncovered


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 2017-10-31  35m