Seriously...

A rich selection of documentaries aimed at relentlessly curious minds, introduced by Rhianna Dhillon.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02pc9qx

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      Spitting Blades


      Former gang member Simeon Moore (aka Zimbo) sets out to explore, challenge and understand the complex relationship between certain urban art forms and knife violence. The recent increase in incidents of knife crime has flooded our media, yet for Simeon such street violence is a reality that he's known for over twenty years. Among his friends, more have been injured, or even killed, through gun and knife violence than not. In his own experience, the attitudes and language depicted in...


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         30m
       
       

      The Cult of Aphex Twin


      Music writer John Doran ventures into the strange world of Richard D James. Over the course of three decades James, known to his legion of hardcore fans as Aphex Twin, has achieved the primary but evasive aim of most serious musicians - the invention, exploration and curation of a truly unique and inimitable sound. Born in Ireland and raised in Cornwall, James was radicalised by the underground acid house phenomenon that swept UK clubs in the late 1980s but, unlike many of his peers, he...


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         31m
       
       

      Out of Tredegar


      Michael Sheen explores Aneurin Bevan's roots in Tredegar. A spectre is haunting Tredegar. It feels a little like that at least. This town high in the South Wales Valleys is understandably proud of its most famous son and makes the most of his memory. Aneurin Bevan was born in Tredegar in 1897. And he was the local MP there until his death in 1960. Memories of Bevan still populate the streets. Aneurin Bevan was a coalminer at the age of 13. He was a troublemaker with a stutter. An...


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         30m
       
       

      Journeys in Afrofuturism


      In the light of the phenomenal success of the Black Panther movie, Emma Dabiri explores the resurgence of Afrofuturism in arts, and particularly in music. Afrofuturism is a term used to describe much art and music of black of origin, often when it uses ancient African imagery and mythologies and fuses it with something other-worldly and futuristic. From the cosmic sounds of jazz musician Sun Ra, who reinvented himself as an Egyptian-inspired space-traveller, to the syncopated beats of...


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         31m
       
       

      Face in the Crowd


      In 1977, Africa Liberation Day took place in Handsworth Park, Birmingham. Vanley Burke was there to document it. Now he meets four of the people he caught on camera. All children of Windrush immigrants, they were the first generation to be born in this country or, if 'sent for', to grow up here. They share memories of that day in the park. For some, it was a day of political awakening as they listened to the speakers from across Africa and the Caribbean. For others, a day out with...


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         31m
       
       

      The Fight of the Century


      Bonnie Greer tells the story of one of the most famous sporting contests of all time - a boxing match in June 1938 between the American Joe Louis and the German Max Schmeling. The fight took on massive international, social and cultural significance and millions of people around the globe listened to the contest on their radios, making it the largest radio event in history. Schmeling had shocked the world two years earlier when he defeated Louis and became the toast of Germany, with...


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         1h1m
       
       

      Pink Rabbits and Other Animals


      The writer and illustrator Judith Kerr has created some of our best-loved books for children since publishing her first, and perhaps most famous book, 'The Tiger Who Came to Tea', which celebrates its 50th birthday this year. Judith's life has always inspired her writing, from fleeing Nazi Germany as a child, a story she told in 'When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit', to the peculiar family cats whose adventures she chronicled in the Mog series. Now 94 years old, Judith is still hard at work,...


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         31m
       
       

      Echo in a Bottle


      The echo has always been a source of fascination for composer and sound designer Sarah Angliss. She reveals how writers, poets and musicians have tried to capture and bottle the thrill of the echo down the ages. Sarah travels to Maidenhead to encounter a remarkable natural echo under a bridge built by Brunel in the 1830s. Dr Rowan Boyson explains how Wordsworth used verse to convey a vivid impression of echoes, decades before the recording age, and Dr Miranda Stanyon discusses the...


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         32m
       
       

      The Sisters of the Sacred Salamander


      A convent of Mexican nuns is helping to save the one of the world's most endangered and most remarkable amphibians: the axolotl, a truly bizarre creature of serious scientific interest worldwide and an animal of deep-rooted cultural significance in Mexico. The Sisters of Immaculate Health rarely venture out of their monastery in the central Mexican town of Patzcuaro. Yet they have become the most adept and successful breeders of their local species of this aquatic salamander. Scientists...


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         30m
       
       

      The Walk: For Richer, For Poorer


      How do the rich and the poor live together, side-by-side every day? Journalist Cole Moreton walks across the London Borough of Kensington in a revealing series of real-life encounters that build and tell a story like a drama. From a food hall to a food bank, he goes into the homes, shelters and multi-million pound apartments of the men and women who are surviving - or thriving - as inequality grows. Life expectancy drops dramatically, wages are slashed and property prices fall through...


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       2018-06-12  59m