The Audio Long Read

The Audio Long Read podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more

https://www.theguardian.com/news/series/the-audio-long-read

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 35m. Bisher sind 623 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint alle 3 Tage.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 15 days 6 hours 35 minutes

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From the archive: Liquid assets: how the business of bottled water went mad


We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2016: How did a substance that falls from the air, springs from the earth and comes out of your tap become a hyperactive multibillion-dollar business? By Sophie Elmhirst


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The troubled times we live in, and the rise of social media, have created an age of endless conflict. Rather than fearing or avoiding disagreement, we need to learn to do it well. By Ian Leslie


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Consent has been portrayed as the cure for all the ills of our sexual culture. But what if the injunction to ‘know what you want’ is another form of coercion? By Katherine Angel


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From the archives: Why Silicon Valley billionaires are prepping for the apocalypse in New Zealand


We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2018: How an extreme libertarian tract predicting the collapse of liberal democracies – written by Jacob Rees-Mogg’s father – inspired the likes of Peter Thiel to buy up property across the Pacific. By Mark O’Connell


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The student and the algorithm: how the exam results fiasco threatened one pupil’s future


Josiah Elleston-Burrell had done everything to make his dream of studying architecture a reality. But, suddenly, in the summer of 2020, he found his fate was no longer in his hand. By Tom Lamont


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The most insidious kinds of violence are those that cannot be seen, because those with the power to inflict harm are blind to the consequences of their actions. By Jacqueline Rose


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From the archives: The fall of Saigon: witnessing the end of the Vietnam war


We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week: In a special tribute to Martin Woollacott, the Guardian’s former foreign correspondent and foreign editor, who has died at the age of 81, Alan Rusbridger reflects on his fondest memories of Martin and how this ‘giant of journalism’ should be remembered. From 2015: North Vietnamese troops who marched into the capital on 30 April 1975...


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'My body is unserviceable and well past its sell-by date': the last days of Avril Henry – podcast


Avril Henry lived a fulfilling life, but as age took hold and her body failed, it was one she no longer believed was worth living. Why did the law stand in her way? By Katie Engelhart


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Hunting the men who kill women: Mexico’s femicide detective – podcast


Although femicide is a recognised crime in Mexico, when a woman disappears, the authorities are notoriously slow to act. But there is someone who will take on their case. By Meaghan Beatley


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From the archive: The real story behind the fake 'Islamic plot' to take over schools


We are raiding the Audio Long Reads archives and bringing you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: In 2014, documents alleging a conspiracy to Islamise Birmingham schools were leaked to the media, sparking a national scandal. The papers were debunked – but the story remains as divisive as ever. What really happened? By Samira Shackle


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