Walter Edgar's Journal

From books to barbecue, and current events to Colonial history, historian and author Walter Edgar delves into the arts, culture, and history of South Carolina and the American South. Produced by South Carolina Public Radio.

http://southcarolinapublicradio.org/programs/walter-edgars-journal

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 51m. Bisher sind 352 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint wöchentlich.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 12 days 10 hours 50 minutes

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In Her Shoes: A History of the League of Women Voters of South Carolina


The League of Women Voters of South Carolina has a long and colorful history. Born out of the women's suffrage movement, the South Carolina League was organized in 1920, the year of the ratification of the 19th Amendment that ended a 72-year struggle for


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   51m
 
 

The Beginnings of Black Activism in South Carolina


After World War I, Black South Carolinians, despite poverty and discrimination, began to organize and lay the basis for the civil rights movement that would occur after World War II. Dr. Bobby Donaldson of the University of South Carolina talks about the


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   51m
 
 

Judge J. Waties Waring and the Secret Plan that Sparked a Civil Rights Movement


Four years before the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education, a federal judge in Charleston hatched his secret plan to end segregation in America. Julius Waties Waring was perhaps the most unlikely civil rights hero in history.


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   51m
 
 

Stories of Struggle: The Clash over Civil Rights in South Carolina


In her new book, Stories of Struggle: The Clash over Civil Rights in South Carolina (2020, USC Press), journalist Claudia Smith Brinson details the lynchings, beatings, cross burnings, and venomous hatred that black South Carolinians endured—as well as


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   51m
 
 

Charleston Patriots in Exile During the Revolution


In the months following the May 1780 capture of Charleston, South Carolina, by combined British and loyalist forces, British soldiers arrested sixty-three paroled American prisoners and transported them to the borderland town of St. Augustine, East


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 2021-02-01  51m
 
 

The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature


“In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. I am, in the deepest sense, colored.” From these fertile soils—of love, land, identity, family, and race—emerges The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's


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 2021-01-25  51m
 
 

Newspaper Wars: Civil Rights and White Resistance in South Carolina, 1935-1965


In spite of a growing movement for journalistic neutrality in reporting the news of the 20th century, journalists enlisted on both sides of the mid-century struggle for civil rights. Indeed, against all odds, the seeds of social change found purchase in


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 2021-01-18  51m
 
 

Uncompromising Activist: Richard Greener, First Black Professor at USC


Richard Theodore Greener (1844–1922) was a renowned black activist and scholar. The first black graduate of Harvard College, he became the first black faculty member at the University of South Carolina, during Reconstruction. He was even the first black


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 2021-01-14  51m
 
 

Pat Conroy: My Exaggerated Life


Pat Conroy’s memoirs and autobiographical novels contain a great deal about his life, but there is much he hasn’t revealed with readers until now. My Exaggerated Life (2018, University of South Carolina Press) is the product of a special collaboration


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 2021-01-04  51m
 
 

Liberia, South Carolina: An African American Appalachian Community


In 2007, while researching mountain culture in upstate South Carolina, anthropologist John M. Coggeshall stumbled upon the small community of Liberia in the Blue Ridge foothills. There he met Mable Owens Clarke and her family, the remaining members of a


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 2020-12-28  51m