We Have Concerns

Jeff Cannata and Anthony Carboni talk about the personal philosophical concerns they find lurking inside everyday things. It's fun?

http://wehaveconcerns.com

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 21m. Bisher sind 650 Folge(n) erschienen. Alle 2 Tage erscheint eine Folge dieses Podcasts.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 10 days 16 hours 36 minutes

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episode 651: Block the Sun and a Battery of Waste


The crisis of global climate change is causing some researchers to consider drastic measures, including the idea of sending nanoparticles into the atmosphere to reflect the sun's rays away from Earth. But the government of Sweden isn't having it. Anthony and Jeff debate the science of blotting out the sun. Then, what if you could have a battery that lasts 28,000 years? A new startup aims to have a working prototype available in 2 years. The catch? It's made out of nuclear waste...


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   52m
 
 

episode 650: Mystery's Afoot and Selfless Parrots


When fifteen different severed feet washed up in a section of the Pacific Northwest called the Salish Sea, speculation ran wild of a serial killer, or some other nefarious culprit. But when scientists started to study the are, they discovered an explanation even more incredible. Jeff and Anthony look into the Mystery of the Floating Feet. Then, can birds be selfless? New research into two species of parrot reveals a surprising capacity for generosity...


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   52m
 
 

episode 649: Creating Tears and Encouraging Truth


Scientists have created groupings of cells that can cry. Jeff and Anthony debate whether this creates incredible new frontiers, or is a nightmare from which we will never awaken. Then, a new study suggests that shifting reader attention online can help combat the spread of inaccurate information. Adding a request to rate information accuracy can actually change the quality of information they share online. Anthony and Jeff discuss how effective this approach might be on social media channels.


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   53m
 
 

episode 648: Send Sperm to the Moon and Dinosaur Gaps


Scientists have suggested that humans could build an "ark" filled with sperm samples — on the moon. The ark would involve shooting the sperm and ova samples of 6.7 million species up to the moon via multiple payloads. Anthony and Jeff discuss the plan and whether it makes any damn sense whatsoever. Then, dinosaurs were the dominant vertebrates on earth for 150 million years, yet their size range doesn't correspond with other fossil groups...


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   1h0m
 
 

episode 647: Lancelot Drink and Headless Slugs


What separates us from the primates? Opposable thumbs? Self-awareness? What if it's water efficiency? Anthony and Jeff discuss a new study just might provide an answer an age-old question in an entirely new way. Then, researchers have discovered a kind of sea slug that can cut it's own head off and regrow its body over a series of weeks. Jeff and Anthony wonder what THAT'S like.


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 2021-03-14  1h1m
 
 

episode 646: Lucid Dreaming and Alone with Your Thoughts


An international team of researchers was able to achieve real-time dialogues with people in the midst of lucid dreams, according to a study published in Current Biology. Jeff and Anthony discuss whether they have experienced lucid dreaming, and if the excitement around this study is a bit overstated. Then, how difficult is it for humans to be alone with their thoughts? A new study shows just how far people will go to stop the silence...


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 2021-03-05  54m
 
 

episode 645: How the Dinosaurs Went Extinct and Ambivalence


In a paper published in Scientific Reports, Harvard astronomers offer a new view on what may have caused dinosaurs to go extinct 66 million years ago. Jeff and Anthony look at the evidence. Then, what if the key to having an open mind is not caring? Anthony and Jeff examine a study about ambivalence and the power of "meh".


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 2021-02-26  55m
 
 

episode 644: Butterflies in the Rain and More Memories


A drop of rain hitting a butterfly is the equivalent of a bowling ball hitting a human. So how do they survive in the rain? New research reveals a fascinating answer. Jeff and Anthony discuss how the butterfly's natural defenses from rain can be applied to human beings. Then, what if the memory could be stimulated by external means? Anthony and Jeff debate the usefulness of trans-cranial stimulation, based on a new study.


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 2021-02-19  44m
 
 

episode 643: Quantum AI and Tiny Rango | #643


What if an AI could learn, not by simply doing an activity over and over, but by actually employing creativity? A new quantum computer aims to do just that, and it has Anthony and Jeff wondering what exactly makes intelligence intelligent. Then, a new record for the tiniest reptile ever discovered has been set in the island of Madagascar. Jeff sells Anthony on the idea of getting an itty bitty teeny weeny chameleon as a pet.


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 2021-02-05  1h1m
 
 

episode 642: Buying Happiness and Getting Ceres-ous


The old adage is that money can't buy happiness. But what if it can? Anthony and Jeff take a look at new studies that attempt to put that notion to the test, scientifically. The answer might surprise you. Then, a Finnish astrophysicist has written a paper detailing a plan for a human colony, not on Mars or the Moon, but in a floating satellite orbiting the dwarf planet Ceres, between Mars and Jupiter...


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 2021-01-31  59m