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    Learning To Program By Building Tiny Python Projects
    2020-07-28 (duration 54m)
    [transcript]
    41:25 And as you have worked on writing the book, and going through the review process and getting it edited, what are some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process?
    44:24 technical book. And for somebody who has made it to the end of your book, what are your thoughts on some of the useful resources or next steps for people who are interested in progressing in their use of Python or getting into programming as a career or at least using it heavily for a tool in whatever endeavor they are engaged with?
    48:33 we'll see. Are there any other aspects of your work on the book or your experience teaching newcomers to Python or your career as a software engineer that we didn't discuss that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
     
    The Past, Present, And Future Of The FLUFL: Barry Warsaw Shares His History With Python
    2020-07-13 (duration 51m)
    [transcript]
    47:10 Fair enough. So are there any other aspects of your work in Python or in technology as a whole or your engagement with the Python community or its impact on your life and career that we didn't discuss the you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    17:22 And so looking back at the past 25 years of your involvement with Python, what are some of the things that in retrospect, have been the most interesting or surprising or exciting and some of the turning points in both the success of the language and in your own career and involvement with it?
    43:49 is all important things for software. It's not just about making the bits fly about, it's making sure that the humans who read it are able to figure out why they're being lazy. Right. Exactly. Outside of Python, what are some of the other languages or communities that you look to for inspiration in your own work and for potential future directions for the language or new capabilities?
     
    Pure Python Configuration Management With PyInfra
    2020-07-06 (duration 43m)
    [transcript]
    30:48 to see that what are some of the other interesting or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process of building pi infra or some of the complexities that you've had to deal with in its develop?
    37:46 for the future of the project. You mentioned a few different goals that you have, but what is your overall vision for where it's going to end up or anything that you are looking for help with contributions or feedback Or anything as you continue to grow and build on the project?
    39:35 Are there any other aspects of your work on pi infra or the ways that you're using it for infrastructure management or just the overall space of configuration and infrastructure that we didn't discuss that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
     
    Build Your Own Domain Specific Language in Python With textX
    2020-06-30 (duration 54m)
    [transcript]
    37:38 And as far as projects that you have seen built with tech stacks or that you've built yourself what are some of the most interesting or innovative or unexpected ways that you've seen it used?
    48:21 And as you continue working with text x and using it for your own purposes and for your teaching, what are some of the new capabilities or features or just overall improvements that you have planned for it or associated projects that you have in mind to build?
    39:36 Yeah, that's really cool. And as far as your experience of building tech stacks and maintaining it, and continuing to use it as a teaching tool, what have you found to be some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process?
     
    Adding Observability To Your Python Applications With OpenTelemetry
    2020-06-23 (duration 53m)
    [transcript]
    34:25 And then for being able to gain compatibility and visibility into the broader ecosystem, I know that there are specific libraries for things like Django or flask to auto instrument, the peculiarities of those frameworks. But what is the overall strategy or approach for being able to gain broader adoption within the overall ecosystem of web or data or, you know, just network systems, things like that?
    42:28 And then in terms of your experience of working with the open telemetry community and working on the specification and some of the SDK implementations, what are some of most interesting or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process?
    31:30 and digging more into the specifics of Python and the SDK implementation of it. Can you discuss a bit about how that is actually implemented and some of the initial design decisions or assumptions that were made early on that had to be revised or reconsidered as you get further along in the implementation of it and the overall adoption of its use?
     
     
    Build A Personal Knowledge Store With Topic Modeling In Contextualize
    2020-06-15 (duration 58m)
    [transcript]
    43:42 in terms of the experiences that you've had building, contextualize? And some of the other topic modeling platforms that you've worked on? What have you found to be some of the most interesting or complex or complicated aspects of that and some of the most interesting or unexpected lessons that you've learned in the process?
    49:57 there is a certain amount of formality to Using an application like contextualized. And again, you should have a basic understanding of Topic Maps Topic Maps are seemingly quite simple and conceptually I suppose they are. But there are some darker aspects or some nooks and crannies with regards to Topic Maps that if you don't really understand that there's some things that just won't make sense. Topic Maps, for example, have this concept of scope and scope you could think of as a synonym for context or as a synonym synonym for perspective or point of view. So it's very easy to it or it's possible in something like contextualized to to create different perspectives of what is basically the same underlying data. But you need to understand that you need to understand that and you need to be able to to set up your topics but specifically the associations and the resources that you're connecting to those topics. You need to understand the concept of scope, otherwise, you won't get this benefit out of something or contraction, right? So again, there's some formality and some pre required or basic knowledge that you need to have to use something or conceptualize, to get value from it. So if you are not willing, or if it's not your need, it's not about just willingness or lack of willingness. If it's not something that you need, if it's if you are just putting a couple of notes together on a specific topic, and you want to, yeah, and if your needs don't go beyond that, then then don't use something like contextualized absolutely don't. It's overkill. So yeah, probably something along those lines.
    40:56 And so one of the other use cases for knowledge management system stims is in the context of a team, whether that's a group of people who are collaborating on a creative endeavor or a team of engineers or just a group of people who work in the same company. And I'm wondering what your thoughts are on the utility and potential benefits of contextualize in that context and being used in a group setting.
     
    Open Source Product Analytics With PostHog
    2020-06-08 (duration 49m)
    [transcript]
    43:53 then as far as your experience of building post hog, what have you found to be the most interesting or Unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process.
    46:16 And are there any other aspects of your work on post hog or the process of building out a product analytics platform or its utility or just anything else about the topic at hand that we didn't discuss the you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    45:29 And when is post hug the wrong choice, and somebody would be better served using the Google Analytics of the world or some of the other open source offerings that are maybe more limited in scope.
     
    Extending The Life Of Python 2 Projects With Tauthon
    2020-06-02 (duration 33m)
    [transcript]
    17:59 our there Any cases where you have either been tempted to or actually gone through with implementing new functionality that's unique to tau THON because of its usage of a continued support for the Python two ecosystem? Or is that something that you have consciously decided to not accept as either new feature set or as requests from other people?
    03:58 and so In terms of the use cases and the ways that you're using tough on yourself or seeing it used by others, what are some of the main environments or types of applications that it's being employed with?
    21:44 and are there any other elements of the surrounding Python ecosystem that have been challenging to make work with Taff on maybe things like IP or some of the test capabilities or ci services that rely on for being able to verify their own code?
     
    Dependency Management Improvements In Pip's Resolver
    2020-05-26 (duration 1h16m)
    [transcript]
    51:32 in terms of your own goals. Once this body of work is done, what are some of the additional changes or improvements that you would like to see or be involved with either and PIP or some of the other core elements of the Python landscape?
    1:12:39 TV series of good omens, which is a thing he did with Terry Pratchett, which I thought was absolutely fantastic. I've thoroughly enjoyed watching that I'd recommend it to anybody who enjoys either Terry Pratchett or or Neil Gaiman.
    57:00 In terms of your experiences of working on this new dependency resolution algorithm and improving some of the overall implementation of PIP and paying down its technical debt, what are some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process
     
    Easy Data Validation For Your Python Projects With Pydantic
    2020-05-18 (duration 47m)
    [transcript]
    36:05 And what are some of the other interesting or innovative or unexpected ways that you have seen, pedantic used that you have been particularly surprised or impressed by?
    38:26 but mostly, I don't know. And in terms of your own experience of building and growing the pedantic project, what are some of the most interesting or challenging or unexpected lessons that you've learned in that process?
    14:14 So because pedantic is a library, and also because it's doing this runtime type checking, as opposed to just the ahead of time validation that you might get from a linter or something like my PI, what are some of the points of overhead or the potential complications that get added by using pedantic in place of the built in capabilities or doing this ahead of time checking? Well,
     
    Managing Distributed Teams In The Age Of Remote Work
    2020-05-11 (duration 48m)
    [transcript]
    39:29 And so what are some of the other useful pieces of advice or useful references that you have looked to as you continue on this journey or any other advice or topics that you think we should cover before we start to close out the show,
    44:03 And one other common practice for remote teams is the idea of having an annual or a quarterly gathering where everybody goes usually to the central office headquarters for people who are partially remote or to some location for places that are all remote. And I'm wondering what your thoughts are on the benefits of that, or cases where that might be suboptimal?
    45:22 Are there any other aspects of your experience of managing a remote team or working remotely yourself or the overall topic of distributed workforces that we didn't discuss the you'd like to cover before we close out the show,
     
    Maintainable Infrastructure As Code In Pure Python With Pulumi
    2020-05-04
    [transcript]
    51:56 and what are some of the most interesting or innovative or Unexpected design patterns or integrations into the broader Python ecosystem that you have seen your users use with plumie. In their infrastructure projects.
    56:38 Are there any other aspects of paluma itself, or infrastructure as code in general, or the benefits and integrations of using full programming languages with this space that we didn't discuss that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    21:35 And yet, in cloud infrastructure, we haven't gotten to that point yet where we kind of have any meaningful standardization of cross platform or lowest common denominator API's surface area that's broad to us, folks are still heavily specializing for individual individual services and individual cloud platforms. And so offering these kind of higher level abstractions is still meaningfully harder than it is I'd say for typical you know, Python machine learning frameworks. Or filesystem API's or what have you where it is, it's become pretty easy to to offer nice cross platform higher level generalized API's. And so that's a that's a key problem that we're working on is on kind of what are the tools that you need and infrastructure world to empower you to have these these generalized things, but still let folks take advantage of smaller level details when they need to why they want to really get a specific benefit out of AWS or out of a particular service. And so we have a few tools we've built to kind of help with that.
     
    Build The Next Generation Of Python Web Applications With FastAPI
    2020-04-20 (duration 58m)
    [transcript]
    50:42 and any new or improved capabilities?
    43:42 And what are some of the most interesting or unexpected or innovative ways that you've seen fast API used by either yourself in your projects or other people who have been leveraging it?
    41:11 what are some of the other interesting or unique or underutilized features of fast API that users might not be aware that you think they should use more frequently?
     
    Distributed Computing In Python Made Easy With Ray
    2020-04-14 (duration 40m)
    [transcript]
    36:27 Are there any other aspects of the ray project itself, or the associated libraries or the overall space of distributed computation that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show, or the work that you're doing with any scale?
    13:45 for the types of workloads that somebody might think of for Ray, what are some of the limitations that they should be aware of or edge cases that they might run into as they're developing the application or any of the specific design considerations that you have found to be beneficial for successful implementations,
    32:41 What are some of the most interesting or unexpected ways that you have seen Ray used and some of the types of applications that people have built with it?
     
    Building The Seq Language For Bioinformatics
    2020-04-07 (duration 36m)
    [transcript]
    33:58 yeah, are there any other elements of the Sikh project itself or bioinformatics or language design that we didn't discuss that you'd like to cover. Before we close out the show,
    24:42 in terms of the data sets, do you find that there are a large volume of information that's available in the public domain for people to be able to do their own experimentation and test out seek with those data sets? Or is it something where a lot of the information is held in practice? Data Sets by different companies working in the biotech industries or the pharmaceutical industries and any challenge that you've seen in terms of being able to make seek available and get it in the hands of people who are doing this types of research or any collaborations that you are either currently engaged with or seeking to be able to get that feedback to help evolve the language.
    26:21 as you have been building the seek language and working on improvements and experimentation with it, and working with some of the end users, what have you found to be some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging aspects of building a language for this problem domain and just some of the overall elements of language and compiler design?
     
    An Open Source Toolchain For Natural Language Processing From Explosion AI
    2020-03-31 (duration 51m)
    [transcript]
    44:48 and as a contributor and maintainer of all these projects, and as somebody who is running a business that relies on the What have been some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned over the past few years.
    47:25 aspects of your work at explosion or the spacey and prodigy and think tools that we didn't discuss yet or anything else in the space of natural language processing and deep learning that we didn't discuss the like to cover before we close out the show?
    42:45 And then as far as the most interesting or impressive projects that you see, and I'm curious what you have found to be notable and worth calling out either things that your team has created. With the tools that you're building or things that you have seen built with those tools that you're releasing.
     
    A Flexible Open Source ERP Framework To Run Your Business
    2020-03-23 (duration 1h7m)
    [transcript]
    53:21 This is far away from our usual cases, which are more web shops and sales related or purchase related implementation.
    50:13 And then as far as the usage of Triton, I'm sure that it's been used in a pretty wide array of businesses. And I'm curious what you have seen to be some of the most interesting or innovative or unexpected ways that it's been used and deployed.
    57:49 which you can put or pull data from. And thanks to this entry point, you can enter directly into Triton we Of course, your credentials and so on, and F some specific actions. So for example, for the timesheets, you can fetch the timesheets of specific days. But you can also push a new, a new a new line in your timesheet and or, or you can edit existing right. And we would like to have more application like that, for example to do the shipping in the warehouses.
     
    Getting A Handle On Portable C Extensions With hpy
    2020-03-17 (duration 35m)
    [transcript]
    30:56 in terms of any help or contributions or support. weren't for the project, what are some of the most useful skill sets or ways that people can help to move the project forward?
    32:49 And are there any other aspects of the work that you're doing on h pi or the goals that you have for it or some of the potential impacts and benefits that we didn't discuss that You'd like to cover before we close out the show. So we're just wondering if there's anything else that you think we should talk about in terms of the work you're doing on h pi, or any of the potential benefits or impacts that it might have or any of the related projects that will be a benefit from it?
    05:23 API. And in terms of the people who are involved in this project, I understand that pi pi being one of the main intended consumers there obviously people working from it there. Are there any other projects or people within the C Python core contributors or the steering council who are either contributing to it or who you have had conversations with about determining and appropriate direction for it?
     
    The Advanced Python Task Scheduler
    2020-03-02 (duration 33m)
    [transcript]
    20:10 And as you have grown and maintain the project, and as people have used it for their own particular projects, what are some of the features or capabilities that have been requested, which you've consciously left out or pushed into other projects that rap or take advantage of AP scheduler or integrate with it?
    30:58 and in terms of contributions or engagement with the project? Is there any particular help that you're looking for or any particular skill sets that would be useful to?
    21:04 That's fine verb such a long running project, it's entirely expected that different details will fade into the background. And it's impressive that you've kept it going as long as you have. And in terms of some of the design strategies or features that might often be overlooked or underappreciated, what are some of the things that you think users should be more aware of or would be able to benefit from digging deeper into,
     
    Reducing The Friction Of Embedded Software Development With PlatformIO
    2020-02-25 (duration 46m)
    [transcript]
    35:27 and so in terms of the projects that you've seen people build using platform i o What have been some of the most interesting or unexpected or innovative uses of the platform.
    36:49 And in terms of your own experience of building platform i o and working in this embedded hardware space What have been some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process, I think is it
    26:52 And you mentioned that scans is the sort of core reason that platform IO is built around Python but if you were To start the entire project over today, are there any things that you do differently in terms of the overall design or project focus or the implementation language?
     
    APIs, Sustainable Open Source and The Async Web With Tom Christie
    2020-02-18 (duration 43m)
    [transcript]
    35:57 And are there any other aspects You're work with the ENCODE organization, or your work in the web space and async in general, or any of the other aspects of the Python language or community or your career that you're focusing on that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    05:29 you know, people will say, Well, what is it that you build? Or what do you do? Well, I build software for people who build software. Yeah, that's about as close as I can.
    10:57 From your work on Django rest framework. I know that that is still an ongoing project and one that's still supported. But with the introduction of asynchronous capabilities in the core Python runtime, I know that you also decided to revisit what API's mean in that landscape. And that took the form of starlet so I'm wondering if you can talk a bit about what the starlet project is and how your work Django rest framework influenced your thinking with this new project and how the two sort of play off of each other or relate to each other or not?
     
    Learning To Program Python By Building Video Games With Arcade
    2020-02-11
    [transcript]
    37:55 and in terms of any help or community support. For the project, are there any particular skill sets or projects or tasks that you are looking for assistance on,
    39:12 Well, are there any other aspects of the arcade library itself, or teaching programming or using video games as an educational tool that we didn't discuss that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    30:52 And as far as the work that you've done with your students or any examples that you've seen from the community, what are some of the most interesting Innovative or unexpected ways that you've seen arcade used? Yeah, I've had one
     
    Build Your Own Personal Data Repository With Nostalgia
    2020-02-04 (duration 32m)
    [transcript]
    25:28 And so what are some of the future directions that you have planned for the project either in terms of new data sources or new applications to consume the data or just overall updates to the system infrastructure and system design?
    29:40 come to mind. All right, well, are there any other aspects of the nostalgia project or the ways that you're using it or some of your thoughts on personal data management that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    06:06 And so I know that there are a number of other platforms or systems that you can use for being able to track some of those types of information. And I'm wondering if you can just give a bit of an overview about some of the other tools or systems that you've tried out before building the style just as a way to be able to collect and manage your data and be able to get some of that same types of insights as what you're using nostalgia for?
     
    Simplifying Social Login For Your Web Applications
    2020-01-27 (duration 34m)
    [transcript]
    07:53 for a number of projects, they'll actually have both options where you can create an account using An email or a username and password, but then also have the option of using different social providers whether that's Google or Facebook or Twitter or GitHub or what have you. And I'm wondering what you have found to be some of the other best practice or common trends among people using Python social author as to whether they prefer to have that option of maintaining identity on their platform or if they tend to prefer just relying on these social providers as the primary or only authentication mechanisms. Frankly, I
    33:18 Thank you very much. Thank you for for having me or
    26:01 And in terms of your experience of using Python, social author or your conversations with people who have been using it for their own purposes, what are some of the most interesting or unexpected or innovative ways that you've seen it used?
     
    Building A Business On Building Data Driven Businesses
    2020-01-20 (duration 41m)
    [transcript]
    38:50 All right. Well, are there any other aspects of the reed ash product or the business you've built around it or the overall business intelligence market that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover with close out the show.
    20:35 And because of the fact that read ash was born out of a hackathon, it seems somewhat obvious that Python would be the language that you chose for implementing it as a way of just being able to get something done quickly. But I'm curious if you were to start over today, if there were any design elements or foundational pieces of the code that you would do differently, either choosing different languages or different frameworks or just overall different system architecture.
    02:23 Sure. So Redash is basically like, you can call it a BI tool. But in simple terms, it's a web interface that you can use to connect to your databases or actually data sources because we support more than just databases like Google spreadsheets, JIRA, Salesforce, or any JSON API. Then once you connected you can query those sources. and visualize the results in different forums like charts, maps, whatever or just a plain table is fine as well. group that in a dashboard and share within your team or company organization. So redish was born actually as a hackathon project the beat over Six years ago at the, at the the previous company, I was working at everything me, we we were just starting to use redshift. And we needed a tool to share the data for merchants. And we didn't find anything at the time that would work well with with redshift. And we had hackathon. So at that hackathon, I created the first iteration of freedom. And that's how it started.
     
    Using Deliberate Practice To Level Up Your Python
    2020-01-13 (duration 48m)
    [transcript]
    43:41 So are there any other aspects of teaching learning or deliberate practice that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    44:57 Well for anybody who wants to Get in touch with you or follow along with the work that you're doing or try out any of your courses or exercises I'll have you add your preferred contact information to the show notes. And with that, I'll move this into the pics and this week I'm going to choose a book that I've been listening to called the managers path by Camille fornia. Talking about the different stages of management with a particular focus on technical management and references to the path that she went on going from tech lead to a manager to all the way up through a CTO. So it's definitely been a useful learning resource for me to gain a better understanding of the different aspects of management at different levels. And even if you're not a manager, it's a useful book to listen to, to understand some of the ways that you can engage more effectively with your managers. So definitely recommend that one. And so with that, I'll pass it to you, Reuben, what do you have for pics this week?
    16:41 So first of all, the way that I structure the exercise, typically, I'll like lead up to it and depending on the course I'll give anywhere between or depending on the topic I'll give anywhere between five and 30 minutes, let's say an introduction in live coding and talking about it. They'll say okay, now you've got some background in it. Here's the problem. Solve it with it. tools that you have. And some of these will be more obviously, sometimes less. And they'll go and solve it. And it can take anywhere between 10 and 40 minutes depending on the problem. And then I go over it with him, I solve it. And because the the solution is not what they're looking for is not what they should be aiming for. It's the practice, it's the sort of path that you get, there's a technique, so they can see the process that I go through in solving the problem. From my perspective, the solution is not as important as that process, they should see how do I structure it? How do I start with a little bit, and then I check it, and I go a little bit more. And I sort of build out and out and out and doing my coding. I mean, sometimes people say, well, Kim, I wasn't able to make it to class can just get the solutions. They'll say I'll give them to you. But really, it's that process. That was the most important thing. I will also I'll show them when I'm solving a problem. I'll also show them a few different techniques. I'll say we could do it this way or this way or this way. Here is why I prefer it this way rather than that way, either because it's easy to read or maintain or it's easier to test or it's sort of less comfort. Sex for people to understand, or it's faster right there also the different considerations we need to have there. Now, I wish I had the time and one of these days, I will actually do it in my courses to have people get up and show their own solutions, because I think that's a really important part of it. Also, I do that with my online courses with weekly pilot exercise, where we have a forum and I encourage people to show what they've done. And everyone sort of learns for everyone else in that way. And I sometimes Of course, it's like I would have called the Python practice workshop, which was like an in person version of weekly Python exercise, where in a day, we go through between six and eight exercises. And there I actually don't show them the solution. Rather, I will have them present it. And if we have like two or three different groups present what they've done, I find that very useful, pedagogically also. And another thing that I do especially with my non programmers course, is because I'll give an exercise and I know that half the people won't be able to do it and they won't be able to because they're new, it's hard. It's a lot of stuff to do, but you know what they were probably 80% 90% there and something just got them stuck with They couldn't finish off. And if I'm physically located in the classroom, they can come over and take a look at their computer. But often I teach online as well with like WebEx or with zoom. And so then it's a little harder or they're just embarrassed or they don't even know how stuck they are. And so what I'll do is, before I go through the final solution to the problem, ask people who did not get it to work to show me their code, and I love going through two or three people's code that does not work, because it's typically so incredibly close. Or it points to misconceptions that they had misconceptions that it's not only theirs, but many people's. And if everyone's willing to sort of be embarrassed a little bit and not knowing because I mean, they're in the class because they don't know then going through these problematic pieces of code can really I think, helped to emphasize some of the some of the issues but I'll just say one more thing here, which is I might can't remember when I started, but for about five years now, so it might have been just before just after I was last on the show. My hobby slash obsession is studying Chinese and the teacher I've been with for most the time. She's an active An excellent teacher. And part of the reason is when she says, Do you understand this? And I say, Yes, she basically doesn't believe me. She says, Okay, give me an example. Give me two examples. Give me three examples. And it's only when you're forced to actually come up with a solution yourself, even though you 30 seconds ago, we're saying, haha, I understand it. Having to actually act on that and use it and create something based on it is a whole different story. And so especially on the topics that are sort of hard for people to grasp, I don't really believe it. When they say no questions, we get it, I'll force them to actually do something with it. And I think that's, that's sort of other called controlled frustration is an important part of the learning as well.
     
    Checking Up On Python's Role in DevOps
    2020-01-06 (duration 33m)
    [transcript]
    30:03 And are there any other aspects of DevOps or the ways that Python is being used in that context or your experience writing the book, or anything along those lines that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    08:57 And for people who are just getting started, particularly And Linux and Unix based environments the first experience that they'll usually have is using something like bash or seashell or z shell for doing some of these automation routines and usually as you continue along that path or it gets to be a point where trying to use that as the automation language just becomes very difficult and clunky and I'm wondering what your experience and perspective is on sort of when the right time is to stop trying to use some of the built in Terminal languages or terminal environments and move to Python instead.
    05:41 And so for people who have been using Python for developing web applications or writing simple scripts or for doing data science, there are a lot of different ways that they use the language. So I'm curious in terms of your experience, what you have seen as being the unique aspects of how DevOps engineers and Cisco Administrators use software and the aspects of the language that they find particularly useful.
     
    Python's Built In IDE Isn't Just Sitting IDLE
    2019-12-24 (duration 36m)
    [transcript]
    30:23 Are there any other aspects of your work on the idol project or your experience as a core contributor or the idol module specifically that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    24:33 And I believe that there have actually been a few projects that have tried to build more full featured editors on top of idol and using that as a base. I'm curious what you have seen as far as any projects along those lines or other interesting or innovative use cases that it's been leveraged for.
    11:54 And so I'm wondering if you can go through a bit more of the feature set that is built into idol so that people can maybe compare and contrast between the initial implementation that they might have from just typing idle at the command line and seeing a window pop up and then wonder what am I supposed to do with this versus people who are coming to Python from the experience of using some of these more full featured or heavyweight IDs or even something like Emacs or VI, where it's just a native text environment, and all the integrations are set up manually.
     
    Riding The Rising Tides Of Python
    2019-12-16 (duration 44m)
    [transcript]
    29:34 And going back to Python itself. What are some of the aspects of the language or its overall ecosystem or the community which you feel are either lacking or they don't receive enough attention and that we should be spending more focus on and more energy on either improving or filling any technical gaps or anything along those lines?
    02:19 point. And my understanding is that you have used Python exclusively in your professional life. And I'm curious if there are any other programming languages that you have been exposed to or experimented with and taken any inspiration from as along your journey of working in Python or just some of your views on the rest of the programming community as somebody who has been using Python professionally for so long?
    05:33 And along that journey, what are some of the projects that you have been involved with what you're particularly proud of or that you think were sort of milestones along your career?
     
    Debugging Python Projects With PySnooper
    2019-12-09 (duration 45m)
    [transcript]
    39:04 And overall, what have been some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging aspects of creating and maintaining and promoting pi Snooper and maybe some of the opportunities that you've gained as a result of its popularity?
    25:39 And then in terms of the actual implementation, what are some of the edge cases or technical challenges that you encountered while working on it either in how Python itself operates or in how pi Snooper interacts with the program that you're debugging?
    40:27 Are there any other aspects of your work on pi, Snooper or the state of the art in debugging within the Python ecosystem or anything else related to your work that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
     
    Making Complex Software Fun And Flexible With Plugin Oriented Programming
    2019-12-03 (duration 1h2m)
    [transcript]
    1:00:18 of the pop implementation itself or the overall paradigm or some of the ways that you using it that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
    23:42 aspect. And so in terms of the pop library or framework itself, however, you want to refer to it as I'm wondering if you can dig into some of the ways that it's implemented and some of the other languages or libraries or ecosystems that you've looked at for inspiration as you have it. graded on the design and philosophy around the development pattern and the specifics of pop itself.
    52:57 Yeah, this whole approach definitely seems Like it does a good job of tackling some of the friction that occurs when we try to reuse software where that's generally the ultimate goal of right once reuse many times. But then as you said, particularly with libraries or, you know, particular applications that are intended to be incorporated into a larger hole or work alongside them, there's always some amount of rework or custom updates or glue code that needs to happen in order for things to actually be reused. And it seems that by having the entirety of the context encapsulated in this plugin subsystem, it makes it much easier and more likely that you can actually implement these aspects of your domain logic in this subsystem, and then be able to reuse it across multiple code bases that need to be able to handle some of those same problem domains. So I'm definitely excited to start experimenting with that on my own but for anybody else who has started drinking the Kool Aid at this point, I'm wondering, the other side of things, what are some of the limit Patients of pop Yeah, they're in the implementation or the broader paradigm, or cases where you would recommend against following this paradigm. And you would recommend for something more traditional or something that people are already familiar with,
     
    Faster And Safer Software Development With Feature Flags
    2019-11-26 (duration 1h1m)
    [transcript]
    58:52 correlate, or not even correlate, that drive, that kind of success,
    38:38 Yeah, and that definitely gets into some of the more advanced use cases, like you're saying, a B testing and being able to dynamically route traffic through a certain code path based on whether it's a cookie or a header or a user ID and I'm wondering what you have found to be some of the challenges that organizations or teams face as far as As how to implement some of those types of dynamic feature toggles and be able to track the appropriate metrics and getting a useful and effective feedback loop for when those feature toggles are causing problems or, or how to measure some of the user facing metrics or user interactions based on the feature path that they're going down and how that factors back into their overall development workflow.
    31:44 Another thing to consider when dealing with some sort of dynamic system that can toggle your feature flags or feature branches is the question of auditability where if it all lives alongside your code base, and all you're doing is maybe changing a value in a settings.pi file or in a YAML configuration, then you can go back in time and see, okay, this is what the value was at this time, this is what it is now. Whereas if you're just toggling something in a web UI or sending an API request, I'm wondering what you have seen as far as some of the auditability, or some of the strategies for auditing those changes over time in that type of content? Yeah,
     
    From Simple Script To Beautiful Web Application With Streamlit
    2019-11-18 (duration 49m)
    [transcript]
    36:34 And in your own experience of building and evolving streamline, what have you found to be some of the most challenging or unexpected aspects of the technical implementation or lessons that you've learned in the process?
    31:37 For people who are first coming to stream live. I'm curious, what are some of the types of feedback that you've seen as far as the types of tools or processes that they had been using previously that they've been able to replace with stream live and some of the other types of systems or frameworks that you consider to be in the same type of space that you can either use collaborative Or that stream that might replace or supplant?
    32:10 Sure. Just curious what you have seen in terms of feedback of people who are coming new to stream let who had existing workflows or processes, what types of technologies or workflows they are replacing with stream look?
     
    Automate Your Server Security With GrapheneX
    2019-11-11 (duration 35m)
    [transcript]
    24:36 And as far as your experience of building graphene x and working with your friends on improving it, what have you found to be some of the most interesting or unexpected or challenging aspects of the project and any particularly useful lessons that you've learned as a result? The interesting part of the
    06:38 So I face elevation of privilege attacks or attack vectors most of the time, but there is also some network issues like the like some vulnerabilities that will let users to spoof network packages or send malicious requests. So these are the two coming Things that I face and causing those type of threats. howling should be an important term to developers and the operators
    23:50 and for the different modules as Do you have any built in testing for verifying when they run effectively or to prevent a duplicate run. If a particular setting has already been configured.
     
    Accelerating The Adoption Of Python At Wayfair
    2019-11-03 (duration 42m)
    [transcript]
    34:15 for any other organizations or companies or groups who are interested in building a similar type of team or organization to encourage the use of Python and educate other engineers. What are some of the lessons that you have learned in the process or tactics that you found to be particularly useful or helpful or any other advice that you might give?
    09:59 and Are there any analogous groups throughout wayfarer that are serving to support other technology stacks or languages? Or is this something that's unique to Python?
    16:25 And then within your team, I'm wondering if you have found that there are some other useful training materials or sort of product scaffolds that you can use to hit the ground running when you're working with other groups or useful tools or libraries that you've been able to leverage either within projects that are helpful for you internally to have sort of reusable patterns or tools, again, particularly helpful for some of the other teams that you've worked with.
     
    Building Quantum Computing Algorithms In Python
    2019-10-29 (duration 36m)
    [transcript]
    19:39 And I'm wondering what you found to be some of the most interesting or challenging or unexpected aspects of your work on the ocean software stack as well as your experience of working with these quantum algorithms.
    27:24 And then I'm also curious about some of the most interesting or innovative or unexpected ways that you've seen developers use the ocean SDK and the quantum processes that you're exposing. And also, if you can talk a bit about the leap platform that you've mentioned a couple of times and how that fits in with your overall product offerings.
    30:08 And I'm wondering how you approach metering of the usage for people who are submitting their problems to be able to count up those 15 millisecond intervals up to whatever they're either free or purchased. allocation happens to be
     
    Illustrating The Landscape And Applications Of Deep Learning
    2019-10-22 (duration 56m)
    [transcript]
    22:19 And for the target audience of the book, I'm curious how much background understanding of programming or statistics or machine learning is necessary and to what level of facility you expect them to get to by the end of the book.
    27:54 and now that it has been published, I'm curious if there are any elements of The topics that you covered or the specifics of the code examples that you think you would have done differently or that you think might need updating in the near future.
    53:07 Are there any other aspects of the field of deep learning or your work on the book that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show or any other parting words that you'd like to give to the listeners and potential readers?
     
    Andrew's Adventures In Coderland
    2019-10-15 (duration 1h0m)
    [transcript]
    52:23 Because the, you know, the word the the world outside of a laptop
    33:30 Yeah, I think one of the ways that you can tell if you're talking to somebody who has been working as a career software developer is if you ask them a yes or no question, and they say it depends.
    55:57 And are there any other aspects of your Work on the book or your own experiences, getting engaged with software engineering and the overall subculture of it that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show.
     
    Exploratory Data Analysis Made Easy At The Command Line
    2019-09-23 (duration 52m)
    [transcript]
    42:51 So what are some of the most interesting or unexpected or innovative ways that you've seen visited a used,
    46:09 And looking forward, what are some of the features or improvements that you have planned for the future of visit data?
    48:09 Are there any other aspects of visit data or data exploration or any of the other accompanying projects that we didn't discuss it that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to close out, that we didn't discuss yet that you'd like to cover before we close out the show?
     
    Cultivating The Python Community In Argentina
    2019-09-18 (duration 41m)
    [transcript]
    09:49 I think that in that in that regard, is no different from other countries or areas, we have a a lot of people working in other languages like commercial languages with a good basis in universities like shower or pay PHP or c++. And at the same time, we have like, a lot of languages that are are not widely used by Do they have a good community here, especially especially in universities, like Lisp, or Haskell. But again, in the same in the mean, similar with will happen in a lot of other places. Python has a steady, growing, but not really quite growing a lot until 10 or seven years ago, which, at some point, a lot of people are starting to use Python, like five years ago or something like literally exploded loaded with a quantity of people trying to learn Python from the science world. So I don't have a particularly specific data for Argentina and other countries. But what I've heard and in my experience is similar to what happened in the US or Europe,
    15:19 know somebody in the group that that specialist is in that so he every every every become he covers some sort of teach a little, but we have we normally do also a sports like playing football or basketball, or actually, or, for example, the last PE camp, we had a talk from an specialist about astronomy, we were in the mountains in a really dark place. So he talked about stars to ask for an hour. And it was very, very good.
    29:45 And I'm curious what it is about the Python language and community that has caused you to spend so much of your time and attention on it as opposed to other endeavors that you might go, that you might spend your time on or other languages that you might be using perfect rationally or personally,
     
    Python Powered Journalistic Freedom With SecureDrop
    2019-09-10 (duration 38m)
    [transcript]
    23:21 this further development or like use cases or things we found interesting.
    33:52 of the future of the project, what are some of the new features or improvements or just overall work and effort that you you have in store in the near to medium term and any help that you are looking for from the community to improve it or add new capabilities?
    31:29 As far as your overall experience for each of you individually. In on the project what have been some of the most interesting or unexpected or useful lessons that you've learned in the process?
     
    Combining Python And SQL To Build A PyData Warehouse
    2019-09-02 (duration 43m)
    [transcript]
    20:56 And on the other end, once the data is already been loaded. And you're looking to do some sort of analysis, or maybe even trained some machine learning models based on the data that's there. What are some of the ways that an analyst or a data scientist might use for interacting with the data warehouse?
    28:43 And another case where the data scientist or the analyst might be leaning on Python is for being able to interact with tools such as TensorFlow, or pytorch, for building machine learning models, which generally require a fairly substantial amount of training data. And I'm wondering how the data warehouse fits into that flow versus some of the other ways that they might be consuming the training information for building the models either in these deep learning neural networks or in some of the more traditional machine learning algorithms that they might be leaning on psychic learn for I
    09:14 And on the other side of what we're talking about today, there's the PI Data ecosystem, which encompasses a large number of packages, but at the core of which most people will consider things such as non pie pandas, maybe the Jupiter notebooks format, and probably things such as psychic learn, or maybe some of the machine learning libraries. And I'm wondering, what are some of the cases where those libraries on their own aren't necessarily sufficient for being able to process data either efficiently? Or where you might need to lean on something such as a data warehouse in conjunction with the PI Data stack for being able to achieve a particular project?
     
    AI Driven Automated Code Review With DeepCode
    2019-08-26 (duration 33m)
    [transcript]
    20:27 And in terms of the overall challenges or anything that was particularly interesting or unexpected that you've come across in the process of building and growing the deep code project and the business around it. What have been something that was sort of notable in your experience?
    03:10 And was there any particular reason for focusing specifically on security defects in code and how to automatically resolve or detect them?
    26:08 And looking forward, what are some of the features or improvements that you have planned for the platform and for the business.
     
    Security, UX, and Sustainability For The Python Package Index
    2019-08-19 (duration 51m)
    [transcript]
    35:40 So in terms of your overall experience of working on and with the Pi Pi platform, and the community of users who rely on it, what have been some of the most interesting or challenging or unexpected aspects of that work,
    34:47 Yeah. So imagine scanning for, like common indicators of compromise, or common indicators that have packages is malicious. For some for some, you know, fuzzy definition of malicious? Because you can imagine, like a recent package that contains malware samples, or what have you.
    35:05 And particularly given the flexibility of Python and the ability to obfuscate the actual intent of the code, it's definitely a non trivial and potentially NP complete problem to be able to actually definitively to determine whether or not a package is malicious or has nefarious intent.
     
    Learning To Program In Python With CodeGrades
    2019-08-12 (duration 1h4m)
    [transcript]
    43:36 Tobias Macey: Yes. And then, in terms of your experiences so far, and your efforts and your work that you've done with some of these study groups, I'm wondering what you have found to be particularly interesting or exciting or unexpected outcomes that you've observed and lessons that you've learned in the process.
    39:38 Nicholas Tollervey: So that's a really great question. Because it allows me to say that co grades is just one, sort of a technique that I've borrowed from music. So I guess by the time you've got grade eight on your instrument, you've got your kind of core skills sorted out, you've overcome the little bit of knowledge, a dangerous thing sort of thing. And you understand that you've got a lot more to learn. And perhaps you have some notion of what it is that you want to specialize in or get into. As a software developer, you might say, I'm going to do data science or machine learning or games development or, or web programming or something like that, in music, we have a similar sort of thing is that you get good at your instrument. And then you might want to specialize as a cellist in Baroque music or as a brass player in brass bands, or, as a wind player as a soloist, or playing in chamber music that, you know, the music world is, is a is a complicated, diverse, huge sort of world to exist. And, and so the notion of grades kind of stops there. So I guess my answer to you would be, if you would like to acquire a new base language, then if using the way code grades works with Python, and that is shown to be a success. If we use that as a template, I can't see there being any reason why you couldn't do that with, for example, JavaScript or Ruby or something like that. However, I would say that Python is particularly suitable for working with beginners, because of its relatively simple and uncluttered syntax. And the fact that you use white space to to find code blocks and things like that means that it's easy to read. So accessibility, when it comes to Python is and the beginner program is is is is a win there, although other programming languages could be used. And it'll be interesting to see if that is in fact, the case. So that I guess is like saying, I've made a grading system for brass players. But now the wind players and the string players and the keyboard players and the electric guitar players and the drummers all want to get involved and have their own great system. But then the other things in the wider community, the system administration, the statistics, the graphical design, the machine learning sort of stuff that feels like stuff that you do after you've got your grade eight. And the way musicians do that is they want they have master classes for a start, where you will have an acknowledged expert will come along and students will prepare at the particular level they are at the concerto or something or other in the discipline that this person is an expert on. And they do it in public as well. So I remember when I was at music college, going along to master classes that terrifying because you're sat in front of your peers,
    42:38 and you're playing to usually a world famous musician at that sort of a level, and they take you apart. And and I don't mean that in a nasty way. I mean, they are finding ways in which they can help you support you, and so on so forth, as well as giving you constructive criticism. The important things is that because everybody's sat in the room, on then everybody gets to benefit from these pearls of wisdom. Now this reminds me a little bit like PI Data meetups, where folks have perhaps that baseline of Python knowledge, they want to get into Python data science, and what will you get, you'll get people giving talks or maybe workshops on, on on data analysis, data science statistics, or machine learning or something in a pie data meetup. And that feels to me very much similar to the sort of master class type thing that that that musicians do. I hope that answers your question.
     
    Algorithmic Trading In Python Using Open Tools And Open Data
    2019-06-17 (duration 50m)
    [transcript]
    34:36 Tobias Macey: And what has been some of the most interesting or innovative or unexpected ways that you have seen people interacting with quad connect and using it and just sort of building in terms of the types of strategies or tactics that they're leveraging.
    33:50 Jared Broad: to give you and to give you more background, the continent community is just so diverse, it's so hard to put them into one bucket, so that we have all the course them graduates, so science, technology, mathematics, chemistry, physics, anybody who's gone through that sort of programming and rigorous training. But then on this is about a third who are financial professionals, they might be working in the fund industry, and doing this on the side or dreaming about starting their own fund, or this academics and traders and just thousands of people from all over the world, there's about half of the community are in the US. But the other half are just spread out in UK, Russia, China, India, is fascinating.
    40:53 Tobias Macey: And are there any other aspects of connect any of its various aspects, or the overall space of quantitative finance that we didn't discuss yet, but that you'd like to cover before we close out the show? Yeah,
     
    Web Application Development Entirely In Python With Anvil
    2019-06-10 (duration 57m)
    [transcript]
    20:46 Tobias Macey: And is there a particular category or set of categories of users that tend to gravitate toward Anvil either in terms of their background or their needs or use cases? So
    53:02 Tobias Macey: domain name is free. And so are there any other aspects of Anvil or the work that you're trying to do to address some of the pain points and shortcomings of web development or anything else about the business or the technology that we didn't discuss that you'd like to cover? Before we close out the show?
    47:46 Tobias Macey: And as far as just the overall features and capabilities of anvil. I'm wondering what are some of the ones that are often either overlooked or underused or misunderstood that you think users would benefit from knowing more about?
     
    Building A Business On Serverless Technology
    2019-06-04 (duration 47m)
    [transcript]
    13:07 Tobias Macey: be able to. And so for developers, they're typically used to thinking about their application design in the context of deploying to a server, or even something like a container where there is some sort of resource where they're able to gain access to different operating system primitives, or that you can have maybe multiple services running, you know, adjacent to each other. And I'm curious how you have found your experience of building on server lyst technologies to influence your overall approach to application architecture and system design.
    29:37 Tobias Macey: And so when building for cloud specific technologies for so things like lambda, or if you're relying on other services that Amazon might provide, or that are not something that you can easily replicate in a local environment, it can be difficult to figure out how to set up your little local development to make sure that what you are running locally for iterating. And testing for your code is actually going to function as expected once you actually deploy it to the destination service. And so I'm wondering how you approach things like local development, when you're building on the server less technologies, and how you manage to ensure that you have sort of a close enough approximation of what the functionality is going to be rather than having to push to lambda or wherever every time you want to verify that functionality?
    43:55 Tobias Macey: and are there any other aspects of your experience, instead of building with surveillance technologies, or any of the other work that you're doing with data coral that we didn't discuss yet, they'd like to cover before we close out the show. I know, I mean, just
     
    A Data Catalog For Your PyData Projects
    2019-05-27 (duration 50m)
    [transcript]
    40:11 Tobias Macey: within that. And in terms of the overall work of building and maintaining the intake project, what have you found to be some of the most challenging or complex or sort of unexpected aspects of building and maintaining it?
    42:31 Tobias Macey: And as far as your experience of using intake on your own and helping some of your customers and community members leverage intake, what have you found to be some of the most interesting or unexpected or innovative ways that you've seen it leveraged?
    05:08 Tobias Macey: And as you mentioned, there are a number of other libraries, both in the Python ecosystem and elsewhere that handle some of this data loading challenge. But as you said, intake is more for providing an abstraction and sort of unifying layer among them. But I'm wondering if you can talk a bit about some of the other projects that overlap some of the functionality of intake in terms of things like the data loading or the data, cataloging something, your projects like quote, data, or the arrow project or data retriever,
     
    The Past, Present, and Future of Deep Learning In PyTorch
    2019-03-10 (duration 42m)
    [transcript]
    15:44 in terms of being able to make effective use of pytorch, how much advanced knowledge of things like machine learning, or artificial intelligence, or neural network topology should users know in order to be able to build these different models or experiment with pytorch.
    35:19 And in terms of your own experience of building and maintaining pytorch, and helping to establish and grow the community, what have you found to be some of the most interesting or useful or unexpected or challenging lessons that you've learned in the process,
    39:08 And are there any other aspects of the pie towards project or deep learning or your overall experience of building and working on this library that we didn't discuss? Yeah, you'd like to cover before we close out the show.
     
    Brian Granger and Fernando Perez of the IPython Project
    2015-06-13 (duration 1h21m)
    [transcript]
    1:19:25 Twitter or email in my case?
    06:54 So for anyone who may not have heard of or used I Python, can you describe what it is?
    1:05:00 Is there anything that we didn't ask you about or didn't talk about that you would like to bring up?
     
    Reuven Lerner
    2015-04-23
    [transcript]
    1:06:13 So my website learn.co.il. From there, you can get to my blog long.larry.co.al. Strangely enough, I'm on Twitter as at Reuven m learner. And so basically everything I do sort of publicly whether it's webinars, books, announcements, blog posts, either my blog or my Twitter feed, or both will have them and I'd be delighted to hear from people email, Twitter, you name it. I'm always delighted to hear from people who have questions or comments, or just want to get in touch and say hi.
    44:15 So I was just wondering if you've seen a change in the demand for iPhone skills, and the time between when you first started using it or using it professionally, at least, and most recently, within the top down or
    1:05:58 Alright, so ruin, we want to thank you very much for taking the time to join us and speak with us today. And for anybody who would like to follow you or find out more about what you're up to what would be the best way to find you or contact you.
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    06:57 In der Welt drin, in der Welt oder um der Welt, um die Welt herum. Mhm. Um mir Glasgow angucke und das, was rausgekommen ist bei Glasgow,
    24:11 Ähm ähm zu erfahren, was gibt es denn in der Welt,
    06:50 Wann ist Zeit für Visionen? Und wenn wenn ich jetzt mir die aktuelle Lage in der Welt angucke mit,
     
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    2021-11-06 (duration 49m)
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    19:26 Teilen der Welt nicht gemacht haben. Ähm und eben auch Firmen, die jetzt nicht unbedingt dafür bekannt waren ähm ach so quer zu sein,
    13:13 Das habe ich gehört. Das hat Floh gesagt. Floh gesagt. Man merkt, äh wenn er denkt, dann kann er nichts mehr zuordnen. In seiner Welt. Menschen nicht mehr wahr? Nein. Nein.
     
    Queerbaiting, Sex und sinnliche Fische
    2021-11-06 (duration 49m)
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    19:26 Teilen der Welt nicht gemacht haben. Ähm und eben auch Firmen, die jetzt nicht unbedingt dafür bekannt waren ähm ach so quer zu sein,
    13:13 Das habe ich gehört. Das hat Floh gesagt. Floh gesagt. Man merkt, äh wenn er denkt, dann kann er nichts mehr zuordnen. Dann ist in seiner Welt. Menschen nicht mehr wahr? Nein, nein.
     
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    2021-10-16 (duration 55m)
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    46:49 Dir auf der ganzen Welt verteilt sind, die sozusagen losschlagen wollen zum Ausmerzen,
    50:34 Und deswegen haben die Corona in die Welt gebracht. Der Die haben Covid-19 in die Welt gebracht und vor allem die der Coronaleugner damit auf jeden Fall ganz viel Infiziertes Blut für diesen Opferstein noch nicht bleibt.
    30:58 Jetzt ist es Lied wie eine Welt. Mhm. Ne, also es gibt ja jetzt dieses Lied. So. Ähm.
     
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    2021-06-26 (duration 1h2m)
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    13:03 äh dass äh dass dass die praktisch die Welt verändert hat äh so in so einem.
    42:04 Und von da aus äh hat er einen perfiden Plan, nämlich die Ermordung aller Regierungschefs der Welt,
    36:01 Ähm es war nicht also an an sich bin ich auf eine neue Verschwörung in der Welt gestoßen.
     
     
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    2021-06-05 (duration 1h4m)
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    30:27 Und laut diesem Demokratieindex gibt es auf der Welt fünfunddreißig äh Staaten, die man als funktionierende Demokratie. Ähm,
    51:38 Also ich habe ein Lied, in dem es darum geht, dass dass diejenigen, die die Macht haben in dieser Welt, ja und äh also,
    58:07 Du kannst alles auf der Welt besitzen und trotzdem der einsamste Mensch sein. Und das ist die bitterste Art von Einsamkeit. Der Erfolg hat mir weltweite Verehrung und Millionen Pfund gebracht.
     
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    2021-05-15 (duration 53m)
    [transcript]
    19:58 dieses nicht gönnen können, ja. Auch dieses Abgehobene, ne, also dieses in ihrer Welt lebende, ja,
    10:10 Bisschen da rein spielt, so irgendwie Showbiss und und äh irgendwie das so reich für diese Welt. Und alle sehr elegante Freunde und die sind doch ziemlich schrille,
     
    Ein Jahr Weltherrschaft | Das Making of des Trailers
    2021-04-24 (duration 1h15m)
    [transcript]
    1:13:21 Hinweis darauf, dass wir die Kategorien, die das nächste Mal vorbesprechen müssten, genauso wie so ein Lieblingsgericht oder aus aller Welt, also was vielleicht besprechen sollst, das nächste Mal lieber vor, damit jeder weiß, was er zu,
     
    Wir Dancing Queens – Das Abba-Universum
    2021-04-03 (duration 1h1m)
    [transcript]
    46:06 auch mental Zeit nehmen muss, der einen aber wenn man sich da in die Welt reinbegibt, wirklich sehr pakt finde ich. Ähm ein echter Klassiker von Tom äh
    48:02 Wie gesagt, nur der Tipp, man sollte sich Zeit dafür nehmen und mentale Kapazität auch dafür haben äh und dann kann das wirklich in eine andere Welt entführen.
     
    Coming Out - ein Leben lang
    2021-03-13 (duration 57m)
    [transcript]
    49:28 die halbe Welt zu beherrschen und ähm,
    08:16 ähm praktisch in die Welt trägt, dass man immer wieder ähm auch vermitteln muss, wer bin ich überhaupt und äh und was bin ich? Und ähm.
    44:37 hat eben ähm sehr stark in der Friedensbewegung quasi äh Ende der achtzehnhundertachtziger dann aktiv, hat die äh weltweiten Friedensbewegungen mitgegründet. Friedenskonferenz auf der Welt äh organisiert.
     
    Der Adel und wir Ofenkartoffeln
    2021-02-20 (duration 1h3m)
    [transcript]
    43:19 Die ganze Welt verschwöre da draußen, um zu polen, dass sie keine Weltverschwörer verschwörerinnen mehr sind. Und ihr wollte das mit.
    45:30 Ja, dann kandidiere mal schön. So, auf jeden Fall, es geht natürlich wie bei allem, was Yannick Schümann anpackt, um die große Verschwulung der Welt,
    46:15 Und ähm was natürlich eine besondere Sensation ist, äh zumal das ja noch gar nicht öffentlich bekannt ist. So und ähm es gibt eine Gruppierung, die für die Verschwulung der Welt arbeitet, nämlich die Schwuliminati
     
    Im Podcast Ihrer Majestät
    2021-01-30 (duration 1h16m)
    [transcript]
    23:39 tatsächlich aus diesem Wunsch äh ähm we have all the time in the world.
    21:25 Ähm und da sind dann aus verschiedensten Ecken der Welt äh allergische Frauen ähm.
    32:14 Und ähm eigentlich ist das, was ähm Stromberger möchte, ist ja eine bessere Welt zu erschaffen.
     
    Der ultimative Jahresrückblick und -Ausblick - ohne Lanz
    2020-12-19 (duration 1h21m)
    [transcript]
    1:18:54 Ich freue mich auf unsere Zuhörer. In der ganzen Welt. Wir sind ja überall vertreten und in zwei Nationen. Ähm,
    07:39 auch in Deutschland aber auch auf der ganzen Welt und wie gehen wir eigentlich mit Rassismus Rassismen um, wie gehen wir mit Unterdrückung um, wie gehen wir mit Gewalt gegen Menschen um.
     
    Wie fragil sind Bürger*innenrechte?
    2020-11-28 (duration 1h5m)
    [transcript]
    36:16 die westliche Welt, ich sage mal, sozusagen Deutschland, Frankreich, Griechenland.
    13:32 Das macht mich eigentlich immer noch ratlos. Andererseits sieht man das auf der ganzen Welt, dass eigentlich diese ähm diese ähm,
    33:21 Die Welt teilweise, ja, also gerade was China angeht, ähm China hat jetzt ähm ähm Freihandelsabkommen mit sehr, sehr vielen Ländern geschlossen, unter anderem ähm.
     
    US Wahlen & ERROR
    2020-11-07 (duration 1h21m)
    [transcript]
    1:13:52 Äh dieses Kammergericht äh in die Welt hat er immer dieses Kammergericht, wow, äh, in die Welt gesetzt haben, deren äh Nachkommen agieren noch heute unter der Decke,
    40:35 Teil der westlichen Welt und ähm durchaus ähm ähm vorne mit dabei,
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