ARRL The Doctor is In

ARRL The Doctor is In is a podcast based on the popular QST magazine column "The Doctor is In." Hosted by QST Editor in Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and columnist Joel Hallas, W1ZR, the podcast is a lively 20-minute discussion of a wide range of technical topics. Sponsored by DX Engineering.

http://www.blubrry.com/arrl_the_doctor_is_in/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 21m. Bisher sind 102 Folge(n) erschienen. Dies ist ein zweiwöchentlich erscheinender Podcast
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Antenna Polarization


Your antenna's polarization can make a big difference in how well you can hear, and be heard -- especially on VHF and up.


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Selecting Coaxial Cable


There are many types of cable for many applications. Which type do you need?


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ARRL's The Doctor is In - Listener Mailbag


The Doctor answers questions from listeners!


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ARRL's The Doctor Is In - Stringing Up Antennas


Trees make handy supports for wire antennas, but getting an antenna into a tree -- and keeping it there -- can be a challenge.


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 2019-06-06  n/a
 
 

Do Dipoles Have to be Straight?


The answer to the question is an emphatic "no," and the Doctor explains why.


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 2019-05-23  n/a
 
 

It's About Time!


A discussion of UTC as well as the importance of accurate time for a number of digital modes.


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 2019-05-09  n/a
 
 

Handheld Transceivers


These little radios are packed with features, but which one is best for you?


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 2019-04-25  n/a
 
 

Listening Outside the Ham Bands


Whether you own an HF transceiver, or a VHF/UHF handheld radio, there is much to hear beyond Amateur Radio frequencies.


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 2019-04-11  22m
 
 

The WSPR Heard 'Round the World


Are you curious about the mysteries of signal propagation, or maybe wondering how well your antenna is working? The answer may be just a "WSPR" away.


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 2019-03-28  n/a
 
 

SWR Simplified


A discussion of SWR -- Standing Wave Ratio -- can be complicated, but it really doesn't need to be.


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 2019-03-14  n/a