New Books in Economics

Interviews with Economists about their New Books

http://newbooksnetwork.com/category/politics-society/economics/

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      Malcolm Harris, “Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials” (Little, Brown and Co, 2017)


      Every young generation inspires a host of comparisons—usually negative ones—with older generations. Whether preceding a criticism or punctuating one, “kids these days” is a common utterance. Perhaps because of the ubiquity of the internet and their heavy presence on it, Millennials have been the most parsed and monitored generation as its members are still in the process of coming of age in history. Stereotypes abound in the media and popular culture: Millennials are...


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      42m
       

      Alice Echols, “Shortfall: Family Secrets, Financial Collapse and a Hidden History of American Banking” (New Press, 2017)


      Alice Echols is a professor of history and the Barbra Streisand Chair of Contemporary Gender Studies at the University of Southern California. In her book Shortfall: Family Secrets, Financial Collapse and a Hidden History of American Banking (New Press, 2017) Echols offers a narrative and social history of American capitalism in the years of and preceding the Great Depression by focusing not on Wall Street but on Main Street and the men who ran hundreds of small-town building and loan...


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      1h0m
       

      Malcom McKinnon, “The Broken Decade: Prosperity, Depression and Recovery in New Zealand, 1929-39” (Otago UP, 2016)


      In his new book, The Broken Decade: Prosperity, Depression and Recovery in New Zealand, 1928-39 (Otago University Press, 2016), historian Malcolm McKinnon, adjunct associate professor at Victoria University, explores the critical decade of the 1930s in New Zealand’s history and national memory. Utilizing archival records, statistics, and artistic representations, McKinnon details the efforts of New Zealand’s government and people to cope with the unprecedented conditions.


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      14m
       2017-12-15

      Eli Cook, “The Pricing of Progress: Economic Indicators and the Capitalization of American Life” (Harvard UP, 2017)


      I was joined by Eli Cook from Israel to talk about his amazing new book The Pricing of Progress: Economic Indicators and the Capitalization of American Life (Harvard University Press, 2017). While economists and politicians are busy discussing alternative measures of progress, Eli Cook traces the long history that brought us to use the GDP as a measure of growth, success, power, wellbeing. This is not only the history of technical metrics, this is the history of ideas and of a dominant...


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      46m
       2017-12-06

      Pasquale Tridico, “Inequality in Financial Capitalism” (Routledge, 2017)


      I was joined by Pasquale Tridico, Professor of Political Economy at Roma Tre University in Italy. His latest book, Inequality in Financial Capitalism, was published by Routledge in 2017. The issue of inequality has regained attention in the economic and political debate. This is due to both an increase in income inequality, in particular among rich countries but not only, and an increasing interest in this topic by researchers, policy makers and political movements. In this book, the author...


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      42m
       2017-11-29

      Michelle Murphy, “The Economization of Life” (Duke University Press, 2017)


      In The Economization of Life (Duke University Press, 2017), Michelle Murphy pulls apart the late modern concept of “population” to show the lives this concept has produced and continues to produce, and, importantly, the lives it has failed to allow under the banner of postwar development projects. In the post-WWII period of decolonization, experts and state planners in the Global North tested in the real-world the hypotheses of Demographic Transition Theory (industrialization...


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      40m
       2017-11-27

      Mike Wallace, “Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898-1919” (Oxford UP, 2017)


      In 1898, a new metropolis emerged from the consolidation of New York City with East Bronx, Brooklyn, Staten Island and the western part of Queens County. In Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898 to 1919 (Oxford University Press, 2017), Mike Wallace describes the first two decades of this city’s expanded history, a period in which it led and embodied the developments that were taking place nationally. As he explains, consolidation was a trend throughout America during...


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      48m
       2017-11-22

      Marc Lavoie, “Post-Keynesian Economics: New Foundations” (Edward Elgar, 2014)


      This interview is a conversation with the author, Marc Lavoie, and his colleague Dany Lang. We discuss Post-Keynesian Economics: New Foundations (Edward Elgar, 2014) and Marc’s contribution to the heterodox-mainstream debate in economics. The book provides an exhaustive account of post-Keynesian economics and of the developments that have occurred in post-Keynesian theory and in the world economy over the last twenty years. Topics covered include open-economy issues, the methodological...


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      37m
       2017-11-22

      Jonathan Morduch and Rachel Schneider, “The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope in a World of Uncertainty” (Princeton UP, 2017)


      Volatility. Instability. Insecurity. Precarity. There’s a burgeoning lexicon seeking to capture the grim economic state of more and more Americans. Join us as Jonathan Morduch describes what he and Rachel Schneider discovered when they got 253 households to track their every bit of income and their every expense over the course of a year. The results—showcased in The Financial Diaries: How American Families Cope in a World of Uncertainty (Princeton University Press,...


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      39m
       2017-11-21

      Jeremy Milloy, “Blood, Sweat, and Fear: Violence at Work in the North American Auto Industry, 1960-1980” (U. of Illinois Press, 2017)


      In the twenty first century, violence at work is often described in the context of a lone employee “snapping” and harming coworkers or management. In his new book, Blood, Sweat, and Fear: Violence at Work in the North American Auto Industry, 1960-1980 (University of Illinois Press/UBC Press, 2017), Jeremy Milloy argues that violence in the workplace has a much deeper and more complicated history, and that the stereotype of the quiet loner suddenly deciding to commit violence...


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      50m
       2017-11-20