New Books in Sociology

Interviews with Sociologists about their New Books

https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/politics-society/sociology/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 49m. Bisher sind 649 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint alle 2 Tage
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   41m
 
 
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   50m
 
 

episode 85: Eliot Borenstein, "Plots Against Russia: Conspiracy and Fantasy after Socialism" (Cornell UP, 2019)


Borenstein discusses popular conspiracy theories such as the Harvard Project and the Dulles Plan, why and how conspiratorial thinking has flourished in post-Soviet Russia


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   52m
 
 
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   42m
 
 

Leta Hong Fincher, "Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China" (Verso, 2018)


Hong Fincher makes the case that the subjugation of women is a key component of the authoritarian state...


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   50m
 
 

episode 339: Sally Nuamah, "How Girls Achieve" (Harvard UP, 2019)


What does it take for all girls to achieve?


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   27m
 
 

episode 102: Mickey and Dick Flacks, "Making History/Making Blintzes: How Two Red Diaper Babies Found Each Other and Discovered America" (Rutgers UP, 2018)


As active members of the Civil Rights movement and the anti-Vietnam War movement in the 1960s, and leaders in today’s social movements, the Flacks' stories are a first-hand account of progressive American activism from the 1960s to the present.


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   1h21m
 
 

episode 101: Laurence Cox, "Why Social Movements Matter: An Introduction" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018)


Cox highlights how social movements have shaped the world we live in and their importance for today’s social struggles...


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   36m
 
 

episode 336: Racquel J. Gates, "Double Negative: The Black Image and Popular Culture" (Duke UP, 2018)


Gates interrogates understandings of African-American representations on screen...


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   45m
 
 

episode 25: John Komlos, "Foundations of Real-World Economics: What Every Economics Student Needs to Know" (Routledge, 2019)


Komlos argues that the 2008 financial crisis, the rise of Trumpism and the other populist movements which have followed in their wake ‘have grown out of the frustrations of those hurt by the economic policies advocated by conventional economists....


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   35m