Science for the People

Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

http://www.scienceforthepeople.ca/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 1h0m. Bisher sind 532 Folge(n) erschienen. Dies ist ein wöchentlich erscheinender Podcast
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#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?


We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from t...


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#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?


At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away?...


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#528 A Shock Machine and The Lost Boys


This week, we take a look at 2 notable post world war 2 social psychology experiments and their creators: Stanley Milgram and his "shock machine", and Muzafer Sherif's boys camp study on group conflict. How did these scientists approach their work? How...


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#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids


This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featu...


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 2019-06-14  1h0m
 
 

#526 Let Me See You Sweat


Summer is coming, and summer means sweat. Why do we sweat so much, and how do we do it? We hear from Yana Kamberov about the evolutionary origins of our sweat glands, and why it's one of the things that makes us mammals. Then we talk about why some (bu...


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 2019-06-07  1h0m
 
 

#525 Chernobyl


This week we're looking back at a man-made disaster that changed the world: the Chernobyl meltdown. We take a closer look at all the contributing factors that lead the No 4 reactor at Chernobyl to explode and how the Soviet Union's political, scientifi...


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 2019-05-31  1h0m
 
 

#524 The Human Network


What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with ...


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 2019-05-17  1h0m
 
 

#523 Happy As A Clam (Garden)


This week we’re discussing clam gardens on the west coast of Canada and the US, and how indigenous people have been actively managing food resources in the area for thousands of years. Clam garden rock walls are thousands of years old, and people...


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 2019-05-10  1h0m
 
 

#522 Home Alone?


Do you keep your house clean? Do you think that, maybe with the exception of the dog, you're alone in your home? Well, we hate to tell you this, but you're wrong. Your house is filled with microbes, fungi, bugs and much more. This week, we talk about t...


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 2019-05-03  1h0m
 
 

#521 The Curious Life of Krill


Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult t...


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 2019-04-19  1h0m