Stoic Meditations

Occasional reflections on the wisdom of Ancient Greek and Roman philosophers with Prof. Massimo Pigliucci. Complete index by author and source at https://figsinwinter.blog/stoic-podcast/. (cover art by Marek Škrabák; original music by Ian Jolin-Rasmussen).

https://massimopigliucci.wordpress.com

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 2m. Bisher sind 886 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint täglich.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 1 day 14 hours 5 minutes

subscribe
share





On exile and cosmopolitanism


Cicero explains why being sent out of one's country is not a hardship worth worrying about, and tells us that Socrates regarded the whole world as his country.


share







   3m
 
 

884. The time Plato almost lost his life


Cicero tells us about a letter written by Plato during his stint in Syracuse, explaining why temperance is the most fundamental of the four cardinal virtues.


share







   2m
 
 

883. On walking before dinner


They relate, too, of Socrates, that, once when he was walking very fast till the evening, on his being asked why he did so, his reply was that he was purchasing an appetite by walking, that he might sup the better.


share







   2m
 
 

882. Socrates the non-consumerist


Socrates, when on one occasion he saw a great quantity of gold and silver carried in a procession, cried out, “How many things are there which I do not want!”


share







   2m
 
 

881. Three kinds of goods


There are three kinds of goods: the greatest being those of the mind; the next best those of the body; the third are external goods, as the Peripatetics call them, and the Old Academics differ very little from them.


share







   2m
 
 

880. Many schools, many takes


Cicero gives us a rundown of the major Hellenistic schools, which differed in the way they understood eudaimonia, the life worth living.


share







   3m
 
 

879. The philosophical problem with pain


Shall virtue, then, yield to pain? Shall the happy life of a wise person succumb to it? Good Gods! How base would this be! Spartan boys will bear to have their bodies torn by rods without uttering a groan.


share







   2m
 
 

878. Damocles' sword and the nature of happiness


Cicero tells the famous story of Dionysius, the tyrant of Syracuse, and one of his flatterers, Damocles, who learns the hard way that what may look like a happy life is actually nothing of the sort.


share







   3m
 
 

877. An argument in favor of virtue as guarantor of a happy life


Cicero makes one of a number of arguments for why virtue is the only guarantor of a happy life. Let's examine the validity of the argument's structure and the soundness of its premises.


share







   3m
 
 

876. How to evaluate philosophical systems


We are not, therefore, to form our judgment of philosophers from detached sentences, but from their consistency with themselves, and their ordinary manner of talking.


share







   2m