The United States of Anxiety

The United States of Anxiety is a show about the unfinished business of our history, and its grip on our future. Each week, host Kai Wright invites listeners to gather for intimate conversations and deeply reported stories about the choices we’ve made as a society -- and the new choices we can imagine now. We’re learning from our past, meeting our neighbors, and sharing the joy (and the work!) of living in a plural society. Our inbox is also open for your voice memos—send them to anxiety@wnyc.org. And you can keep up with Kai on Twitter @kai_wright. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other great podcasts including Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, and On the Media.

https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/anxiety

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 36m. Bisher sind 111 Folge(n) erschienen. Dies ist ein wöchentlich erscheinender Podcast.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 2 days 18 hours 20 minutes

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episode 28: Blackness (Un)interrupted


Our Future of Black History series concludes with conversations about self-expression. Because when you carry a collective history in your identity, it can be hard to find yourself.  We reflect on the life, language and legacy of renowned writer Zora Nea


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   51m
 
 

The Case Against Those ‘Tubman $20s’


People are excited to replace Andrew Jackson’s face with an abolitionist hero. But Dr. Brittney Cooper argues not all honorifics are the same. The Biden Treasury Department has announced that efforts to put abolitionist Harriet Tubman’s portrait -- in pl


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   15m
 
 

episode 27: Impeachment: Catharsis and Impunity


The Senate’s trial and acquittal of Donald Trump left many with mixed emotions. But did it move us any closer to a reckoning with the worst of America’s political culture?  Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David Blight returns to the show to help Kai put


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   49m
 
 

episode 26: The ‘Beautiful Experiments’ Left Out of Black History


Cultural historian Saidiya Hartman introduces Kai to the young women whose radical lives were obscured by respectability politics, in the second installment of our Future of Black History series.  The MacArthur fellow is the author of “Wayward Lives, Bea


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   49m
 
 

episode 25: The Origin Story of Black History Month


We’ve got complicated relationships with this annual celebration -- from joy to frustration. So to launch our Future of Black History series, we ask how it began and what it can be. Producer Veralyn Williams invites us into a lively conversation about he


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   48m
 
 

episode 24: New Hopes, Old Fears


Kai checks in with poet Jericho Brown, historian Kidada Williams, and listeners as we all try to transition out of the Trump presidency.  Jericho Brown, recipient of the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for poetry, reads his new work ‘Inaugural,’ and reflects upon th


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   49m
 
 

Life After Fascism: A Brief History


Historian Timothy Snyder offers lessons on what could happen if those who enabled the attack on our democracy don’t face consequences.  President Biden was just inaugurated and many Americans are eager to turn the page into a new era. But many are still


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 2021-01-21  15m
 
 

episode 23: How Martin Luther King, Jr., Changed American Christianity


And what MLK’s uniquely Black theology can teach us about the relationship between faith and politics in 2021. Rev. Dr. Yolanda Pierce, dean of the Howard University School of Divinity and author of the forthcoming book “In My Grandmother's House: Black


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 2021-01-18  50m
 
 

episode 22: The American Story, in a Single Day


January 6, 2021, offered a hyper-condensed version of our country’s entire political history--with all of its complexity, inspiration, and terror. In a special national radio broadcast of our show, we walk through a day that began with the historic elect


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 2021-01-11  50m
 
 

episode 21: The (Un)Making of a ‘Model Minority’


An odd racial pecking order puts Indian Americans in a curious place -- outside of whiteness, but distinct from other people of color. How’d that come to be? And is it changing? We explore these questions by revisiting a story from Arun Venugopal, senior


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 2021-01-04  51m