Can He Do That?

“Can He Do That?” is The Washington Post’s politics podcast, exploring the powers and limitations of the American presidency, and what happens when they're tested. Led by host Allison Michaels, each episode asks a new question about this extraordinary moment in American history and answers with insight into how our government works, how to understand ongoing events, and the implications when branches of government collide.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/podcasts/can-he-do-that/?utm_source=podcasts&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=can-he-do-that

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 24m. Bisher sind 224 Folge(n) erschienen. Dies ist ein wöchentlich erscheinender Podcast
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