Criminal

Criminal is the first of its kind. A show about people who’ve done wrong, been wronged, or gotten caught somewhere in the middle. Hosted by Phoebe Judge. Named a Best Podcast of 2023 by the New York Times. Part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.

http://thisiscriminal.com/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 33m. Bisher sind 292 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint jede zweite Woche.

Gesamtlänge aller Episoden: 6 days 16 hours 28 minutes

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episode 12: Break The Internet


In 1999, most of America's tech hysteria centered around Y2K. But at that same time, a teenager in Canada named Mike Calce was messing around in chat rooms, meeting hackers, and learning tricks. At 15, he decided to put his knowledge to the test. To push up against the Internet's limits, and in some places, break them. In the end, he managed to pull off something no one had ever seen before. Today, we talk to the self-proclaimed “MafiaBoy.”


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 November 26, 2014  16m
 
 

episode 11: I'm About To Save Your Life


In 1977, a mild-mannered aeronautical engineer sideswiped a parked car in Compton, CA. When he stopped his car to survey the damage, a man named Leon Moore opened the driver-side door, shoved him over, and started driving. He said, "I'm about to save your life."


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 October 30, 2014  20m
 
 

episode 10: Dear Sheila


Working as a reporter for a TV station in New Hampshire, Kevin Flynn was covering the capture and arrest of a female serial killer named Sheila LaBarre. As he grew more and more obsessed with LaBarre’s story, Flynn decided to write her a letter. She wrote back. Their correspondence became flirtatious, and eventually he went to visit her in person. We talk with Kevin Flynn and Rebecca Lavoie.


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 September 26, 2014  17m
 
 

episode 9: That Crime Of The Month


What does it mean when a woman commits a crime and attributes her actions to PMS? We revisit the first use of the "PMS defense" in this country, back in 1981. What have we learned about the science of PMS since then? Last year, the American Psychiatric Association classified a form of PMS (Premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD) as a mental disorder in the DSM-V...


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 August 29, 2014  12m
 
 

episode 8: Can't Rock This Boat


In March 1964, a 35-year-old African-American woman named Johnnie Mae Chappell was walking along the side of the road in Jacksonville, Florida. Four white men were driving around listening to the local race riots on the radio. They had a gun on the dashboard. As they passed Chappell, one of the men leaned out the car window and shot her to death. As the police investigated, evidence began to mysteriously disappear, making it impossible to punish the men who admitted to committing the crime.


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 July 29, 2014  18m
 
 

episode 7: J.R.R. Ziemba


Crime victims are often put under the same scrutiny as the accused. Not only for their version of events, but sometimes for how they look and talk, too. We meet a man whose trial hurt worse than his assault.


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 June 30, 2014  18m
 
 

episode 6: We Lost Them


On April 13, 2014, former KKK member Frazier Glenn Cross pulled into a Jewish Community Center and ambushed William Corporon and his grandson Reat Griffin Underwood, killing both. He then killed another woman named Terri LaManno a short distance away. What does the family left behind do when they are thrust into a national spotlight? How do they figure out what to disclose and what should be private?


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 May 23, 2014  15m
 
 

episode 5: Dropping Like Flies


Every year for the past few years, tens of thousand of flytraps have gone missing – from the wild, from gardens, from nurseries. And, really, nobody knows where they go. What’s cropped up in rural North Carolina is essentially a Venus Flytrap crime ring — with lackies, middle men, and a mysterious end buyer who’s perpetuating the market.


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 April 24, 2014  24m
 
 

episode 4: Call Your Mom


There are plenty of things we don't share with our mothers. Dark, sad things. Unless of course, you're both in the business of death.


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 March 28, 2014  15m
 
 

episode 3: The Buck Stops Here


With the advent of the Inkjet printer, counterfeiting money became as simple as a trip to Staples. By the year 2000, there were 72 million of these homemade dollars in circulation. The real question is… who was behind them all?


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 February 28, 2014  20m